This is why slower is better (even though it feels sucky)

When we make positive changes in our lives to reach a goal, it’s human nature to want results overnight or, even better, YESTERDAY. You know what I’m talking about if you’ve been on a healthy eating kick. I mean, who wants to plan their meals diligently, grocery shop and cook those meals, eat less than normal, feel hungry, drink a bunch of water, ditch the sugar and fried food, say no to the tv snacks, and get rid of the chocolate stash just for a couple of measly pounds after a entire week of faithfulness to this plan? Not many.

In life, we want a big payoff, or return on investment, when we make a decision to change. Want to make $10K a month? Who doesn’t? It takes time. Want to lose 80 pounds? It takes time. And here’s the deal – most people will get discouraged when they don’t see results fast. In fact, some may argue that diets offering quick results early on equal higher success rates because they spark high motivation. But what they don’t mention is the long term maintenance of said diets. And to me, that’s a failure. Anyone can lose weight. If you’re reading this, you’ve probably done it a dozen times yourself. That isn’t your problem. Your problem is maintaining that weight loss. So my challenge for you is to RESIST the urge to crash diet because crash dieting is no different than what you’ve done before.

In fact, losing weight quickly is a red flag that you will regain that weight quickly.

Why? Because physiologically, the body doesn’t adapt well. We are designed to be protected from starvation. Losing weight in general causes a decrease in the production of the hormone leptin, which signals the brain to say “hey you’re full, you can stop eating now.” It also causes an increase in the hormone ghrelin which tells the brain, “hey you need calories, eat!,” and that means you’re gonna be hungry. Losing weight also means a slower metabolism, because smaller people naturally burn less calories. If there is less of you, you are going to need less calories the smaller you. Make sense?

This creates a problem for the chronic dieter. You have a slower metabolism, but you’re hungrier than ever. Tack on an unrealistic diet you followed to get the weight loss you achieved (say, a low carb diet, an 800 calorie diet made up of all protein shakes, or a cabbage soup diet, you get the point) and well, you don’t stand a chance. Stay with me, there’s still hope.

If you are losing weight slower, say one half to two pounds per week, it can actually be a sign that you are likely to keep that weight off. Why? Because you are probably doing something that you can continue doing long term (i.e. you aren’t on the latest and greatest fad diet of the season). Think about it this way – if you are looking back at the last four weeks and you’ve lost two pounds, I completely understand that it may be really frustrating and you probably feel like you’re getting nowhere. But in one year that equals twenty-six pounds lost. Twenty-six pounds you will keep off for good. Isn’t that better than twenty-six pounds in say, two months that will ultimately result in thirty pounds regained over a year’s time? I know you know what I’m talking about here because you’ve probably experienced something similar.

What is an optimal rate to lose weight?

-If you weigh <250 pounds = 5-10% over six months (so a 200 pound person might lose 20 pounds by the 6 month mark)

-If you weigh >250 pounds = 10-20% over six months (so a 300 pound person might lose 60 pounds by the 6 month mark)

Bottom line, keep at it. Even if your wins don’t seem like much, they are actually a really big deal. Losing weight fast usually means it won’t stay off. I’ve seen it more times than I can count. On the flip side, when people lose weight at a slower pace consistently, I’ve almost never seen them regain it. So let that be an encouragement to you today to stay the course!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

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