4 ways to conquer binge eating

Many people struggle with this and it ruins the best of intentions to lose weight or even just maintain your weight. You could be going along happily in your life and then boom, it hits. You know, that hard to ignore urge to binge until you’ve overdone it that ultimately ends in regret, guilt, and food restriction and/or self punishment. What if you could stop yourself before it even happens? It’s possible.

But first, let’s define what a binge truly is. Technically it’s when you are eating something that elicits the feeling of loss of control until you’ve eaten more than is a desired reasonable amount. The quantity and food varies from person to person. Person A could define a personal binge as eating 3 doughnuts while person B could define their personal binge as not until they’ve consumed the whole dozen of doughnuts. Person A could define a personal binge as consuming two servings of potato chips while person B could define their binge as eating the entire family size bag. Make sense? We all have different thresholds in this. No judgement for any quantity, it’s more about when you feel like you’ve lost your sense of self control that leads to feelings of guilt and self punishment. That’s no good for anyone.

So let’s talk about some ways to combat it:

  1. Know your triggers. Understand what sets you off in the first place and then avoid it or prepare for it when necessary. Does going to a party trigger you to binge on the chip bowl? Plan ahead of time and know that you simply can’t hang out around the food table. Does having a giant tub of ice cream in your freezer trigger you to indulge in the entire thing as soon as you’re home alone? Don’t buy it! Does having an argument with your spouse trigger you to run to the pantry and dive into the chocolate chip cookies? Put a post-it note on your pantry door that reminds you to stop and take a few deep breathes before you’re so quick to start eating when food is not what you really need at that moment.
    • Understand this, every habit we have is part of a chain that has multiple links. Each link is attached to the next that produces a result. The key is for you to break the link that results in a binge. It only takes one alteration, like a post-it note, to put a kink in that chain and direct you to a different activity.
  2. Exercise regularly. When we exercise on a regular basis, it keeps a steady stream of endorphins going in our system and helps keep our mood stabilized. It also helps us sleep better and thus, make better decisions throughout the day. Ever been sleep deprived for a few days? Remember how emotional and irrational you were? This is a high risk time for binging. In general, those who exercise just feel better about their health and body and have an easier time maintaining their weight overall.
  3. Start the day with a healthy breakfast. If you are going to skip any meal of the day, don’t let it be this one! Really work hard to eat within 2 hours of waking up and strive for 25-30 grams of protein at that meal. This helps stabilize blood sugars, control hunger later in the day, and thus keeps your mood more even making it less likely for a binge later on. Also, usually when we start our day off healthy, we are more likely to keep it going than when we started our day off not so great (say, with a sugary, high calorie breakfast).
  4. Avoid going more than 3-5 hours without eating. This one just makes sense. If you let yourself get too hungry and the setting is right, a binge is inevitable. Plan for high protein snacks such as cheese sticks, yogurt, deli meat, nuts or high fiber foods such as fresh fruits and veggies to fill in the gaps when meals are spread far apart. Find some other options here.

Lastly, this will be a work in progress for you if you have struggled with binge eating for a long time. The tips I’ve given you will help the person who struggles with occasional episodes of binge eating that they relate to either unhealthy emotions or certain situations that act as triggers for them. I am not referring to someone who has a recognized binge eating disorder which is characterized by behaviors far beyond what is described in this blog post. If you find yourself preplanning binge episodes, eating large quantities of food (in the multiple thousand calorie range) in very short periods of time, purposely eating alone out of embarrassment over the quantity of food eaten, and feelings of “zoning out” and even forgetting what food was consumed during these episodes, you may have an eating disorder and I encourage you to seek professional help from a licensed counselor.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

9 foods we feel guilty about loving

I thought it might be fun to highlight some foods that you may not be eating in an attempt to stay healthy or may be eating laced with guilt. And put a positive spin on them. I know I have gone through periods of my life where I’ve avoided just about all of these foods because at one time they were deemed “bad for you” and then later as “health foods.” I think it comes down to knowing that if it’s a whole food – as in something you can visualize growing in nature or at least close to it, it’s probably okay, at least in small amounts. Remember there is never going to be a cookie or a pizza tree. But you are always going to see the potato roots and the cows out grazing.

  1. Sugar: earlier this year, I hosted a 30 day “no sugar” challenge and the results were fantastic. Because truly, sugar can be addicting and I’m convinced the only way one can overcome that is through a period of elimination. However, if you are attempting to cut the bitter in your coffee, a packet of sugar is only going to add 15 calories. So don’t sweat it. If it’s someone’s birthday and you want to help them celebrate with a slice of cake, go ahead. If you love an occasional soda with your slice of pizza (they go great together), then have one. The research is strong that consuming drinks and foods made with artificial sweeteners do not help with weight loss.
  2. Whole Milk: for the longest time, fat free or low fat was where it was at. Until recently. In past posts, I’ve discussed how full fat dairy products are linked to decreased risk of diabetes and at best, not linked to increased heart disease risk. Certainly, it is well known milk is an excellent source of calcium and vitamin D, important for bone health.
  3. Bacon: if chosen wisely, bacon can be more than a hunk of fat. It can actually be a tasty source of protein. The natural, uncured, nitrite/nitrate free, center cuts will be higher in protein, less saturated fat and without the unnecessary additives that may be linked to increased cancer risk.
  4. Salt: if you have been diagnosed with heart or kidney disease, then you may have been told to reduce or avoid salt. Have you ever wondered why? It comes down to fluid retention – eat salty foods, get thirsty, drink more water. This isn’t good for someone who is collecting fluid around their heart or lungs or for someone who’s kidneys aren’t filtering the fluids out of their body correctly. For the rest of us, we probably aren’t that salt sensitive and can handle it. For table salt, I recommend pink himalayan salt for the added minerals. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying to go out and eat all the salty processed snacks you can find – they still aren’t considered health foods and contain a ton of additives and preservatives without the nutritional benefits you get from whole foods. But for those of us with normal functioning organs, we can probably handle it for the most part.
  5. Bread: it really depends on the how and why. Are you eating a sandwich? And what is on the sandwich? Usually in this manner, the bread is in two controlled slices and serving a purpose. Unfortunately though, the favorite way to eat bread is in the form of an endless loaf or basket of rolls and tub of butter. It’s really all in context.
  6. Potatoes: no, I’m not talking about sweet potatoes. I’m talking about the good ole white potatoes we all love to demonize. Sure, if you are eating chips or french fries, go ahead and continue to hate them. But what about a baked potato? They are actually rich in folate, niacin, potassium, and and phosphorous. Much of the time, we are eating processed cereals fortified with these minerals, but potatoes are natural sources, which means our bodies can absorb them better. Try a loaded baked potato and salad for lunch or dinner – add plain greek yogurt in place of sour cream for extra protein. And eat the skin for extra insoluble fiber.
  7. Pasta: okay, it’s hard to make this a health food, but hear me out. The problem is when we pile a giant heap of pasta on a plate with an ooey gooey cream sauce and a side of buttery garlic bread. Instead think of what is called the “plate method.” This means, you are filling your plate up with about 25-30% pasta, 50% non starchy vegetables, and 25-30% meat. This could be sectioned out or mixed together in a  pasta dish. Point is, your pasta dish has more vegetables than pasta and the side is a salad not a few slices of garlic bread. Make sense?
  8. Red meat: while I don’t necessarily recommend eating red meat every day, this is a good source of iron and B vitamins if consumed once a week. Remember that cuts like sirloin, round, and flank are considered lean. If choosing a higher fat option, just be sure to cut the visible fat off before consuming. Our bodies are able to absorb minerals easier from meat than plants or fortified sources so if you do eat meat and have trouble with iron, this is a better option. For those of you that are anemic and struggle with iron, you know that taking supplements is no pleasant task because of the side effects. Last week, I talked about choosing grass fed meat, which incidentally tends to be your leanest choice.
  9. Eggs: once thought to be a cause of heart disease, that is no longer true. Eggs are an excellent source of choline, which is important for supporting healthy brain function and liver function. Also an easy, cheap source of protein for not only breakfast, but snack time and lunch or dinner.

Did I give you permission to start eating any of these foods more often? Let me know in the comments.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

9 reasons why people are following a dairy-free diet

If you aren’t avoiding dairy like the plague, you probably know someone who does. If you don’t, you may have heard that it’s best to choose the full fat versions over the fat free or low fat. And what about those hormones? Should you choose organic? A dairy alternative?

What’s what? Why are they avoiding it? And should you? Let’s start with two of the biggest, most glaring reasons why someone would want to avoid dairy:

1. Lactose intolerance. In fact, according to the National Institutes of Health, as many as 65% of adults in the U.S. suffer from this – ya know, that bloated, uncomfortable gassy feeling that sends you to the bathroom after you’ve drinking a glass of milk or just eaten a bowl of ice cream?. It’s not an allergy, but just simply the body’s inability to digest lactose, the sugar found in milk, because it lacks the necessary enzyme, lactase, to break it down. It’s actually rare before the age of two. Milk is a big no no here, but often this includes cheese, cottage cheese, ice cream, and yogurt in large quantities. Those who have Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Celiac Disease, Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, or Diverticulosis will more than likely also have lactose intolerance. Many lactose-free options have been developed over the years such as Lactaid milk and my personal favorite, Fair Life ultra filtered high protein milk which now has available options to include DHA omega-3 fatty acids.

2. Milk allergy: this is more than just an intolerance to the lactose enzyme. Understand that an allergy is very different in that it is defined as a damaging immune response by the body to a substance. There is no tolerating even a yogurt or lactose free option if they want to avoid hives, anaphylaxis, or whatever it is that their body does in response to milk protein.

If you don’t fall into the above two categories, you may want to explore some of the other reasons with me to find out why people have sworn off dairy before you decide if you are joining the bandwagon or not:

1. Dairy is an acne-trigger: TRUE. Some research does, in fact show that high intakes of dairy are linked to moderate to severe acne in teenagers and young women due to the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) found in milk. The IGF-1 is the primary mediator for the growth hormone and is present in pregnant milk-producing cows. I believe this hormone and others is to blame for why many people are so nervous about consuming cow’s milk and have made the switch to one of the many alternatives available on the market today. Read on.

2. It contains harmful hormones: FALSE. As with with above, the word hormone gets people nervous and thus, there has been lots of public concern over the synthetic hormone, recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST), that leaks (in miniscule amounts) into our dairy products from pregnant cows. What exactly is it and why is it used? Simply put, it helps the cows produce more milk, i.e. increases efficiency and productivity for their ahem, job. In fact, it’s been studied extensively in it’s twenty years in use and in this most recent review of those many studies, has been concluded totally safe. You have likely seen organic rbST-free milk and yogurt options available in your local grocery store and assumed they were better. From what I have researched, these are in response to market demand, not necessarily safety concerns. If I find out any differently, I will tell you. Promise. If you are still concerned, you have those available to choose from and certainly, if you are acne prone, go for them.

3. Dairy has been linked to certain types of cancer: FALSE except for possibly prostate, which remains inconclusive. In a 2015 analysis of 22 prospective cohort studies (1,566,940 participants), they concluded dairy was associated with a decrease in breast cancer incidence. And again, a study published last month (June 2017), they indicated after analyzing the results of 13 different studies (493,415 participants and 7453 cases) that increased calcium intake coming from diet and supplements was associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer. In another review, published at the end of last year, they concluded that cow’s milk is indeed associated with a reduced risk of colorectal, bladder, and gastric cancer as well but neutral for ovarian, pancreatic, and lung. With that many participants and cases, they make a strong argument. The jury remains out for prostate as there has been evidence that dairy raises the risk of prostate cancer, particularly because of the presence of the IGF-1 hormone. Stay clear if you’re a male and have a strong family history for now….in my opinion. It’ cancer, after all.

4. It raises diabetes risk: FALSE. In a 2016 analysis that included 22 cohort studies comprising of 579,832 individuals and 43,118 Type 2 diabetes cases, total dairy consumption, particularly from low-fat yogurt was associated with a reduced risk. Although another study found no difference using full fat yogurt, suggesting the benefits came from the fact that yogurt is rich in probiotics and the fat content is not as important. Lots of human subjects here, that’s what I like to see in results.

  • 5. It causes inflammation: TRUE, maybe. Looking at 78 studies, it really was a toss-up. This review concluded that dairy products, especially fermented ones, like yogurt, are anti-inflammatory. However, for people who have a known dairy allergy, it is definitely pro-inflammatory. Makes sense, that’s kinda what an allergic response is. As far as what it was that caused the dairy to be inflammatory, they did find more of an association with the dairy products highest in saturated fat.

6. It’s fattening and raises risk of heart disease: FALSE. In the same review, they discussed how in actuality, full fat dairy products raise HDL levels (a good thing). Although whole milk dairy products do tend to increase LDL cholesterol as well, understand that there are two types – small particle and large particle. The small, dense particle size are the ones that are more susceptible to oxidation and artery wall build-up, whereas the large are not. Dairy products have more of the large particles. That’s good. A recent meta-analysis of thirteen studies published in December of last year concluded plainly that :

Higher dairy fat exposure is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

7. It was never meant for humans, only baby calves. Personally, I find this to be a weak argument. One could argue that the only milk meant for humans is breast milk. However, many of us, myself included, enjoy soy milk, almond milk, and many of the other non-dairy novelties on a regular basis. The NHANES pubished in 2010 reported that indeed, children aged 2-4 and 5-10 did have higher BMIs when drinking higher quantities of milk (higher BMI was not necessarily equivalent to obesity). However, these results were used for the 2010 dietary guidelines for Americans to encourage milk consumption among children since a higher BMI (not necessarily obese) for a child is not necessarily a bad thing. After all, it is well known that calcium and vitamin D intake are linked to bone health and that milk is an excellent source of these vital nutrients. We also know that bone mass is developed during childhood and adolescence.

One might argue that calcium and vitamin D are also available from the many dairy alternatives such as almond, rice, soy, and coconut milk, and often in higher quantities. In this study, however, they found that our bodies absorb about 25% less of the calcium most brands of soy milk add to their product compared to cow’s milk. In other words, you need to drink about 12 ounces of soy milk to get the same amount of calcium you would get from an 8 ounce glass of cow’s milk. Another review pointed out that we simply don’t know the amount our bodies can absorb from all of the nutrient-fortified plant-based milk options to say whether or not it’s the same as drinking cow’s milk. Either way, no one can deny our children are consuming energy dense, but not necessarily nutrient dense diets and that’s a problem. Cow’s milk is the only product I know of that is consistently high in protein, potassium, calcium, and vitamin D while low in food additives including added sugars that is widely offered to children in their critical growth years.

Hear me out. If you read my blogs, I understand that some of you read holistic health sites as do I. And much of what I’ve said in this post goes against what you’ve probably read or heard. But I do not believe in living in fear, I believe in what it is evidence when it comes to this stuff. I dig as much as my time allows to avoid any potential bias and present the facts to you. If you have any personal experiences that differ and you need to remain committed to a dairy free diet, there are acceptable options to get your calcium from, including some you may haven’t even thought of yet like kale, broccoli, and canned salmon. If you need probiotics and extra supplementation, I have recommendations that I fully trust and use myself that I would feel confident in sharing with you. Feel free me to contact me if you’d like to discuss it more.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here. We have an upcoming fitness challenge that’s going to be lots of fun!

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Keto diet- is it everything and more?

Several weeks ago, I began a diet review series and I did a brief synopsis of the Keto Diet. I admit it wasn’t very thorough and because I keep seeing it pop up and another friend starting it, another friend losing weight with it, and another person swearing by it for their increased energy, I’m gonna do a more thorough review here. I especially see my friends in the holistic communities doing it- and it’s spreading faster than the Whole 30 diet once was.

Is this the newest fad that will be replaced by something better in a couple of years? Or is it here to stay and in several years we are going to see evidenced based research popping up at how it’s the best diet that we never knew existed and if we just figured out how healthy fat was for us earlier, maybe we wouldn’t be seeing the rise of heart disease, obesity, cancer, and other related diseases that we do today?

Well, let’s start with what it even is. Roughly 70-75% fats (you read right), 5-10% carbohydrate, and 20-25% protein. As you can see this is not your normal low carb diet that typically replaces the missing carbs with protein. It’s all about the fat. Why? Because the purpose of this diet is to put your body into ketosis, aka a fat burning machine. Just to give you a little science lesson here, our bodies preferred source of fuel is glucose (what carbs are converted to after we eat them). Now if you are eating a diet high in carbs, that is what you will burn first for energy. And everything requires energy in our bodies to function properly, including our brains. When the body runs out of glucose (will happen if you aren’t eating very many carbs), the liver is great at producing a back up, called ketones. Ketones come from broken down fat. Make sense?

So why do people do this? I dunno about you, but while a high fat diet sounds pretty fun to me, a diet made of mostly fat doesn’t. But there are lots of anecdotal reports of promising results when one follows this kind of diet. I’ll start with two that have evidenced-based research backing the claims up (because you know me, that’s what I’m about.)

Note: it was very difficult for me to find any studies published prior to 2017 (soooo….6 months ago) that called a ketogenic diet low carb high fat. Be aware of that because any other “ketogenic” diet before that in the research was defined as “low carb, high protein.” There is a huge difference and that’s not what we are talking about here. I worked with patients and personally participated in 2 published studies on very low calorie high protein, low carb diets for 7 years.

Weight loss: this article  published in 2013 reviewed 12 different studies and found in 1415 subjects, the average weight loss after 6 months on a high fat, low carb diet was 2 pounds vs. 1.6 pounds for those following a low fat diet. After a 6 month follow up it was difficult to assess because compliance was not so great and they consumed more carbs than allowed. Another study published in 2009 was done for a full year on 106 obese individuals and compared weight loss of those on a keto diet vs a low fat, high carb diet. They found that their average weight loss was the same between groups, both losing an average of 30 pounds. Pretty good, but neither diet was superior to the other. It just showed that following a reduced calorie diet yields weight loss.

I will add here that I’ve always said, I’ve failed at what I do if I helped you lose weight but you regained it all back. I don’t think we know enough about this diet for the purposes of weight loss to know if it’s not just another yo yo plan. Sorry.

Lipid levels: In the same 2013 review, they analyzed 1258 subjects and found their triglycerides decreased significantly, and their HDL levels increased significantly. Both good things. I like that and the amount of subjects is enough to say it’s valid.

Other indicators of Metabolic Syndrome: The 2013 review noted there was no significant difference between treatment groups in changes in systolic blood pressure (11 trials), fasting blood glucose (eight trials), insulin (six trials), HbA1c – average blood glucose over three months (four trials) and C-reactive protein (four trials).

Athletic performance: In this 2017 review, they concluded that long-term low carb, high fat diets appear to be safe and may even improve several metabolic risk factors for chronic diseases in the general population. They may even provide a promising way to help control body weight and fat mass while maintaining lean body mass in athletes who are participating in sports like tae kwan do, wrestling, lightweight rowing, cycling, and running. Additionally, there is some emerging evidence that a keto diet could improve the performance in ultra-endurance sports as well as those sports with repeated high intensity activities. If you aren’t an athlete, this could still be a good thing if you’re hitting up the gym and wanna try out that new cycling class.

Focus and Mood: this has been one result that many believers love the most. And why I believe they stick with it. Who wouldn’t when you feel great, you’re losing weight, and you’re better able to focus? Who doesn’t need that? Here’s what the available research says: in a 2009 study, they found that after 8 weeks, those following both low carb, high fat diet and a low fat diet had significant improvements in their mood and cognitive functions. However, after a year, the low carb, high fat diet returned to their baseline mood and cognitive functions while those on the low-fat diet continued with their marked improvements. You read that right. The low-fat diet group continued with the better mood, NOT the keto group. This study here in 1998 reported similar results on women eating a high carb diet. I’m just the messenger, don’t hate me! Now, I’m not recommending you go eat a bunch of carbs to feel better. Okay?

Here’s the thing, the concept of following a keto diet for weight loss is fairly new in the research world. So you’re not gonna find a whole lot out there to prove it does a whole lot for health yet. You will find a bunch out there to show the benefits of what it does for those with epilepsy unresponsive to medication. It works.

And don’t expect overnight results. It takes time for the body to adapt to ketogenesis. Some sources I’ve read say two weeks, others say up to a couple of months – assuming you don’t go off plan, not even once. So no cheat days allowed. This diet is for the type A strict meal planning types. Those who are willing to keep a food record and count their carbs, fats, and proteins will do best.

I’m a weight loss expert. And here’s what I know about long term, sustainable weight loss. It’s hard. Like, really hard. If you’re looking for a study that proves ANY diet to work and be the ending answer to our obesity epidemic, well good luck. You will surely find that one person who followed a high carb diet and lost 167 pounds and now has kept it off for 13 years. There’s gonna be that person following the Atkins diet since it’s introduction to the dieting world and it’s changed their life forever. And then there’s the rest of the dieting world still looking for what works for them. I did not find anything that said following the ketogenic diet was harmful, not even long term. In fact, quite opposite. So if you wanna try it because you know someone or more than a few someones who are following it and now they look and feel great and you think it’s something that could help you, well let me know! I’m always looking to be inspired by someone’s dieting success story.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

What should I look for in a protein supplement?

We live busy lives and this often means meals are skipped or we find ourselves in the fast food lines. I’ve said many times, if you are going more than five hours without eating, then you aren’t doing your metabolism any favors – you’ve got to put fuel in the furnace if you want it to keep it burning.

Protein supplements can be a great option to replace those skipped meals. But with the growing health trends, many people get confused about what is good and what is not. So first, let me give you some basic guidelines, whether you are looking at a protein bar or a drink:

Starting with what I like to call “the rule of 20″:

  • Aim for less than 20 grams of sugar per serving
  • Aim for more than 20 grams of protein per serving

You will avoid candy bars and milkshakes disguised as something healthy by following those two simple rules.

Some of my personal favorites include:

Core Power or Core Power Light: Not a lot of added vitamins, which makes them taste a whole lot better, ranging from 20-26 grams of protein and 10-26 grams of sugar. The Light version is definitely the winner here in nutritional content, but I like them both and they each offer different flavors.

Svelte: ready made protein drinks that are dairy free and again, not a whole lot of added junk to make them taste terrible. They are 180 calories and 11 grams of protein, so when I do choose these ones, I make sure to add a hard boiled egg, greek yogurt, or stick cheese to my meal to make sure I get enough protein. They have some good flavors beyond your typical vanilla and chocolate, so check them out.

Slim and Sassy Trim Shake: I have a personal bias because this is from my company, but it contains all natural ingredients, including stevia as it’s sweetener, and only 70 calories per scoop. I am not a fan of it’s low protein content at 8 grams per scoop, but you have the flexibility to make any kind of shake you want because it is a powder, and that’s the point with protein powders. The best part are the two patented ingredients it contains- EssentraTrim, shown in research to help manage cortisol—a stress hormone associated with fat storage in the abdomen, hips, and thighs (who couldn’t use that?!) And Solathin, a special protein extract from natural food sources that supports an increased feeling of satiety (i.e. it makes you feel full, longer, which can be a common issue for some when using liquid meal replacements). Contact me if you want to know how to get it.

Quest bars: you really can’t beat a good tasting bar with 20 grams or more of protein, 1 gram sugar, and an average of 200 calories. Also one of the highest in fiber of bars I’ve seen. They have no added sugar, which is what you will often see in bars like these. Instead, they’re sweetened with sucralose, stevia and/or erythritol and they are gluten and soy free if that’s a concern for you. One caution: if you are sensitive to sugar alcohols, this one may cause you some stomach upset. It never has for me, though.

Think Thin protein bars: another high protein, low sugar bar that comes in at an average of 200-250 calories with 20 grams protein and 0 grams sugar. They are sweetened with sugar alcohols, so again, not everyone will be able to tolerate these but I have never had an issue, personally. Also, you have to be a chocolate and/or peanut butter lover to appreciate this one as all of their flavors contain at least one of those.

How about types of protein?

When choosing a protein meal replacement, be sure you are choosing a high quality protein source that is easily digested and utilized by the body. In order, these are your top sources:

  1. whey protein
  2. soy protein (most dairy-free options on the market)
  3. pea protein (as in green peas, best soy-free vegan option)

How much do you really need?

Unless you are doing some serious body building, 20-30 grams in a single shake or bar will do. Beyond that, the normal body with healthy functioning kidneys will excrete it out because we can only use so much at a time. So save your money on the super-duper 50+ gram protein powders or, if you  really like them, use half a serving instead.

Have a product you love and it wasn’t mentioned here? Let me know in the comments and why you chose it!

P.S. If you aren’t a part of my community, Healthy on a Mission go ahead and ask to join! 

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Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

 

Disclaimer: some of these are affiliate links and I may earn a small percentage if you chose to purchase any of the items recommended above. However, I still would be telling you to give them a try without the potential earnings. Feel free to buy them anywhere you wish!

Ketogenic and the Whole 30 Diets – Yay or Nay?

I’ve recently started a series on some of the more popular diets right now to hopefully take the guess work out of whether or not you should consider them. For this week, I’m gonna focus on the Ketogenic diet and the Whole 30 diet.

Ketogenic diet: a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet – usually three to four grams of fat per gram of carbohydrate and protein combined coming from heavy whipping cream, butter, mayonnaise, and oils. Why it is used: it helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy and should be prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. This is not just a low carb diet like the Atkins.  It is supposed to produce ketones in the body (hence the name), which are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Normally our body uses carbohydrate as its primary energy source. In normal circumstances, the bare minimum I ever recommend is 100 to 130 grams of carbohydrate. This diet includes minimum carbs, often under ten grams per day, to force the body to use fat for energy.

Pros: in those with intractable seizures meaning, non responsive to medications, it can greatly reduce their frequency and severity of seizures. It can cause rapid weight loss, but a ketogenic diet in the true sense is going to do anything but. Also, prolonged ketosis is not a natural state that the human body functions well in (which I will explain below in the “cons” section.) Having said that, it can be life saving and changing for those merely surviving one seizure to the next.

Cons: since the body is designed to use carbohydrates for energy, expect to feel pretty sluggish. Our primary food sources of carbohydrate include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and dairy. So you can expect constipation as well. If you aren’t constipated, you may have diarrhea due to the high fat content or, if you’re really lucky, alternating. Other issues related to a high fat diet include reflux, nausea, vomitting, and kidney stones. In addition, it’s not very nutritionally balanced and even mineral absorption issues can occur causing hair loss, weakened bones, muscle cramps, acute pancreatitis, impaired focus and memory (the brain needs sugar), high cholesterol, increased inflammation, depressed mood, and even menstrual irregularities. Sounds fun, right?

Whole 30 diet: this diet claims that food, primarily grains, sugar, alcohol, and legumes, are the root of all your health ailments. I see this one daily in the health circles I run in. Most people that follow this are doing so because they want to feel better. Nothing wrong with that. It’s temporary and the closest thing I can compare it to is an elimination diet I put people on who are allergic to multiple foods and they aren’t sure which one(s) are the culprit. The theory is after thirty-one days, you will know right away which food is the cause of your health problems because you feel terrible once you reintroduce it back into your diet. While I agree we could all go without sugar and alcohol and be better off for it, I have never met a person who has allergies, irritable bowel syndrome, or chronic knee pain because they eat mini wheats for breakfast and legumes at dinner time. Sorry, but I’ve been a dietitian for a while now and I’ve never seen nor read any validated research backing this up. Having said that, I’m all for a diet that advocates eating more fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and advocates cooking more and eating less processed food.

Pros: it’s an overall very healthy diet that eliminates sugar and refined, processed food – all of which we eat too much of. It’s also high in fiber and protein, two things I’m a big fan of in any diet.

Cons: while I love the idea of getting people to cook more and eat more whole foods, zero eating out and zero convenience food options is going to make this difficult for many in our fast paced society. This diet is only for the motivated individual who can really dedicate themselves to focusing on their food for the month. I’m not really excited about the idea that it’s a temporary diet – going on a diet just means you plan to go off a diet. But hey, if you truly feel better, it could be the beginning of something great, right?

So there ya have it. Two more diets for you. If you are totally in love with either of these diets, I’m only offering my insight and opinions. None of this is meant to hurt feelings of any die hard fans. If you would like to learn more about a specific diet, let me know in the comments section.

Also, if you’d like more information on the diet that I do recommend and how I’ve helped others lose 30-80lbs following simple steps, contact me here.

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Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

Paleo? Vegan? Mediterr-wha? Which diet should I be following?

This has been a popular theme recently in my life so I thought I would give my take on the various diets all over the internet in the coming weeks. My hopes is the clarify some of the confusion and help you decide what is best for your situation. For this post, I’m going to start with the two that I feel are fairly popular and recommended frequently by health professionals.

  • Paleolithic – most commonly known as just, “Paleo” and also known as the “Caveman Diet.” Wildly popular and recommended by doctors, chiropractors, personal trainers, and others for those looking to get lean, gain energy, and lose weight. In summary, it eliminates grains, refined sugar, dairy, potatoes, salt, refined oils like canola oil, and wheat. It consists of nuts, seeds, eggs, olive oil, coconut oil, lean meats, fish, fresh fruits and vegetables. No processed food whatsoever if you are truly following the concept although there are lots of “paleo-friendly” packaged foods on the market that go against this idea. Everyone’s gotta maximize the marketing potential, right?

Pros: it can yield weight loss because it cuts out the calorically dense junk food and it promotes satiety because it tends to be high in fiber and good protein. It doesn’t require you to count calories if weight loss is the goal, which is a big pro for most.

Cons: you’re likely going to have to fill in nutrient gaps, specifically folate, the B vitamins, calcium, and vitamin D which are all found in dairy products and fortified grains. It’s very difficult for the average person to follow long term due to it’s elimination of convenience food and therefore, restaurant meals.

  • Plant based whole foods also known as Vegan. Numerous research has shown the health benefits of following this diet such as lower blood pressure, reduced blood lipids, reduced blood sugar levels, and weight loss to name a few. To truly follow this diet – as in “Forks Over Knives” style, you will need to eliminate all processed and highly refined foods such as added oils and sugars, meat, dairy, eggs, and seafood. It includes fruits and vegetables, whole grains such as wild rice, oats, barley, quinoa, whole grain pasta, millet, and sprouted grain breads, beans, nuts, legumes, seeds, avocados, dried fruits, potatoes, hummus, tempeh, and tofu.

Pros: Could possibly lead to weight loss due to the elimination of calorically dense, highly processed junk food. This diet is also rich in fiber, antioxidants and vitamins/minerals from their natural sources – fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. All which may lead to reduced risks of various types of cancers.

Cons: At first, some may find they are hungry because of the drop in protein intake from animal sources. Supplementation from vitamin B12 is required on this type of diet. There is a risk of iron deficiency because it is best absorbed by the body from animal sources rather than from plant sources. So a person on this diet should be mindful to consume a good source of vitamin C along with a high iron containing food to maximize absorption. Eating in restaurants can be a challenge.

As you can see, both have excellent qualities and downfalls, too. They both take massive amounts of commitment, but have big health payoffs. I recommend starting small, regardless of which one you choose. Overhauling your entire life overnight will never work, so start with removing refined, processed sugars and carbohydrates out of your life first. That’s good for everyone and clearly, it is important enough to be included in both diets I’ve discussed here. In fact, I will be surprised if they are allowed in any of the diets worth anything that I discuss in the coming weeks.

So, what does it mean to eliminate processed, refined carbohydrates? This means you are getting rid of what I call the “six C’s.” In other words – cereal, cake, candy, cookies, chips, and crackers. That about covers it. But for completes sake, foods that come in a box with an ingredient list and sugar content are also processed – granola bars, pretzels, baked goods (especially white versions), fruit snacks (including this for moms), chocolate(s), and of course, added sugar of any kind. If you are going to use it, try agave or honey. They are both going to be processed in the body just like white table sugar but they at least contain some added antioxidants – so still use sparingly.

Let me know what you think and if you’d like to learn more about these topics and gain support from others on this journey, request to join my free online community by clicking here.

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Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

 

You don’t have to eat 3 meals a day

There. I said it.

And I’ll admit, I used to tell people quite opposite when I was working full-time and had the schedule that was conducive to eating three squares a day. Wake up, coffee, eat on the way to work. Lunch break at 12:30pm. Go home cook dinner for the fam. Repeat.

But now I work from home and I struggle to have a schedule that repeats itself daily. And I struggle to take the ten minutes to prepare a meal even though I have more than enough time to do it now.

But life happens and meals aren’t always at the top of my list of priorities. I have a four year old who colors on the walls & floors with permanent marker, paints the tile with toothpaste, scatters cereal in places cereal shouldn’t be scattered, and pulls all of the stuffing out of pillows for fun. A ten minute meal might as well be ten minutes to my own version of the movie, “Home Alone” on steroids.

So what DO I recommend to avoid eating the kitchen pantry by dinnertime because I skipped lunch trying to tame the wild monkey that I call my four year old son? Here’s my short list:

  1. Eat something high in protein (>15 grams) every three to five hours. Go more than five hours without a food rich in protein and you’re likely going to be ready to eat a football player under the table.
  2. Eat within two hours of waking up. Breakfast really IS the most important meal of the day. Skip breakfast and the whole day is going to fall apart. So set yourself up for success and start with 30 grams of protein. Think two eggs and a greek yogurt, a three egg white omelet with cheese, a high quality protein shake (I recommend Core Power, Premier Protein, dōTERRA Trim Shake), or cottage cheese with peaches and a handful of nuts.
  3. Drink your water. I’ll never stop saying this. Preferably half of your body weight (pounds) in ounces. I give lots of advice in previous posts on how to make this work in your life.

So in summary, include lots of protein and eat every three hours. Life isn’t perfect and neither will your meals be. If you can eat three meals per day with planned snacks, by all means, please do. If not, don’t beat yourself up – relax, you’re living your Plan B life, which happens 90% of the time. And that’s still a success!

Need individual help to discover your Plan B life? Contact me today to set up an individual consult for a plan specifically designed to fit you and your lifestyle!

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Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN