New year, new you – time for a detox?

I’ve been quiet on here this month, enjoying the holidays with my family and frankly, getting slammed with my home business. But 2018 is just around the corner and I know many of you are thinking about your health goals. One of the most popular goals, besides weight loss, is whole body detox. We’re coming off the season where there’s no shortage of sugar, fat, and booze and that leaves many of us feeling a bit bloated and gross.

There are a lot of options out there, though. And if you aren’t careful, you could be wasting your time and money, if not participating in something downright dangerous. So let’s start with some basics if you’re going to do this thing right.

It’s important to remember that is essence, it is our organs that are “detoxing” our bodies and they do it every minute of every day. There is no magical outside substance that will do that for you because your body was already designed to do everything it was meant to sustain your life on the daily. However, our daily habits bring us out of balance often and makes our organs work overtime, leading to disease – such as diabetes, high blood pressure, renal failure, and certain types of cancers, to name a few. We are constantly introducing toxins into our systems forcing our organs to work harder than they should.

A detox should last about thirty days. Anything less is a waste of your precious time and just dumb. You’ll lose some water weight and go right back to old habits the following days or weeks when the detox period is over. It’s also just not long enough to really feel any difference that will create any meaningful habit changes. Why do a detox if you aren’t going to carry some new, beneficial habits with you for months after? It really doesn’t need to go longer than thirty days, either, however. Some habits you bring in over the thirty days would help to keep but not all are totally necessary.

Some foods need to be eliminated in this time period, for obvious reasons, including:

Sugar: I’ve written in past articles why sugar is so very addicting and has been clinically proven so. When you eat sugar, it almost immediately spikes your blood stream levels, causing your pancreas to start working overtime to produce insulin to get that sugar into your body’s cells for energy. But guess what? Sugar is very concentrated in calories and it’s likely you’ve consumed way too much energy than is needed for those cells. The rest is then stored in the liver for later use, which collects as fat and can create a fatty liver if not used. Problem is we habitually over-eat calories and it also collects in our abdomen in the form of fat tissue. This is becoming a pretty big problem in America today, actually. The pancreas eventually putters out trying to keep up, leading to type 2 diabetes. Not a happy subject, but I see this every single day as a dietitian.

Processed carbohydrates: these are converted into sugar when consumed, so same thing as above. It’s not just about avoiding table sugar. Earlier this year, I worked with a group of individuals who took a challenge and avoided these types of foods for thirty days, the results were amazing. They felt more energized, lost weight, and their cravings for sugar diminished. These cravings we experience are caused by dramatic blood sugar fluctuations from eating high sugar foods with low nutritional value. As I mentioned above, they get converted quickly to sugar in your blood stream, but just as quickly your pancreas is working to produce insulin to get it out, which causes a sharp drop in your blood sugar levels. This makes you feel pretty crappy and tired, which means you want more to feel better. It’s a viscous cycle.

Alcohol: most of us understand that this is processed by the liver. Too much of it starts to damage the liver (duh), but during a detox it kinda defeats the purpose if you aren’t abstaining. When we drinking alcohol, our body prioritizes the elimination of it and can’t focus on much of anything else. It’s a good recipe for weight gain, liver cirrhosis (hardening of your liver), and pancreatitis (inflammation.)

Caffeine: this one hurts me. I get it. But caffeine is an extremely addictive stimulant. When consumed in excess, it causes an irritable bowel, disruptive sleep patterns, irregular heart beat, and increased anxiety – all counterproductive to the detoxification process. Believe it or not, it also causes pretty wide fluctuations in your energy levels. If you’ve tried detoxing before and didn’t experience increased energy, it could be because you didn’t give up caffeine. Drinking more water is the most beneficial way to improve energy levels.

Let’s talk about what you do include and why, this is the fun part, right?

  1. Water with lemon. Lots of it. Aim for half of your body weight (pounds) in ounces each day. Water is a natural diuretic and so is lemon. This helps your kidneys out. They need flushing so they don’t get backed up. Your kidneys are probably one of the most important filtering systems in your body and I can’t tell you how many people I see regularly that land themselves in the hospital with temporary failure because they got dehydrated. It’s well over 50% of the people I see every single day. Other problems that happen regularly are fatigue, joint and back pain, headaches, and sweet cravings. I recommend pure lemon essential oil since it comes from the rind rather than the juice and it’s way more concentrated than a squeeze from the fruit. One drop of lemon essential oil is equivalent to the juice of thirty lemons (but not nearly as sour!) It is also known for supporting healthy lungs and digestive system.
  2. Fresh fruits and vegetables. When IS the last time you consumed five (or more) in one day? Be honest. Aim for the rainbow, or at least vary your colors. Plant based foods get their pigments from the nutrients they provide which means if you are eating a variety of colors, you are also getting a variety of nutrients in addition to fiber.
  3. A good multivitamin. This can be tough to find. A couple of years ago, some of the country’s most popular retailers of supplements were busted for selling fake products over the counter. In fact, when tested, only 22% of their supplements actually had any of their claimed product in them at all. Walmart being the worst at only 4% of their products containing what they claimed. Ultimately, they settled in court to keep the attorney general quiet – I’m not too confident that means they grew a conscience about what they are selling, though.
  4. Whole food enzymes. Again, lets help the body out, we’ve been eating low nutritional value foods and now we’re including fresh plant based foods. Unfortunately, today’s food supply is still a bit sub-par in the vitamin/mineral world and even fresh fruits and vegetables are sprouting up from nutrient-depleted soil. Whole food enzymes break down the food and help our bodies utilize the nutrient they provide easier. If you struggle from vague health symptoms like fatigue, joint discomforts, or headaches, it could be because you are lacking certain nutrients that your body has been missing out on.
  5. Probiotics: so many benefits here, I did a blog post a few months ago on how everybody should be taking some. For the purposes of a detox, they aid the digestive and immune systems. We are exposed to environmental toxins regularly, our immune system works overtime, especially during the winter. Let’s help it out, shall we?
  6. Pure essential oils. Essential oils are a fantastic way to support the body’s natural capability of cleansing itself. The organs we are focusing on here are our liver, colon, kidneys, lungs, and skin. Like supplements, the essential oil industry can be tricky so it’s important you know the source you are buying from. But when unadulterated and without synthetic additives, they can prove to be an important part of your detox program. Rosemary, cilantro, and juniper berry essential oils are well known for supporting the liver in it’s normal processes. Geranium and tangerine essential oils are helpful in supporting the body’s systems as a whole as it removes unwanted substances. Think of it as bringing things into balance after weeks (maybe months) of use and abuse with unhealthy foods and habits such as lack of exercise, smoking, environmental threats, and even medication use. My favorite product is a detoxification blend that contains all five of these essential oils that can be taken in a soft-gel form.
  7. Omega 3 fats: great for reducing inflammation, often exacerbated by eating highly processed foods, alcohol, and red meats. Let’s help the body out by adding this in while removing the inflammatory foods, why don’t we? Be sure you are consuming a source rich in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA and DHA) to get the maximum benefit. You could always consume fish three times a week, but remember this is a detox and we are going for the concentrated versions. Ok? I personally choose to take the supplements daily because I never eat fish that often and I’ve experience the benefits well enough I don’t want to stop.

In essence, our bodies have everything we need to survive and cleanse itself out from our lungs to our stomach to our intestines, kidneys, and liver. They all have a job to do filtering out the air we breath, food we eat, liquids we drink, and bacteria we come into contact with. Even so, we can feel out of balance in today’s world as we are consistently pummeled with toxic threats. If you feel like it’s time for a reboot, feel free to contact me for more information about how to schedule supplements, the brands I trust, and meal schedule to follow so you get the most out of your detox.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

 

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Back to school tips for a healthy family (and your sanity!)

This is a crazy time of year. Lazy days of summer are over and routines are back in full force. I relish the summer because of slow mornings and relaxed evenings without homework. Movie nights any night we want, lunch at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, and leisurely mid-week breakfasts are over.

I once read that August is kinda like the Sunday of the year. It represents a new start and recommitment to improving what hasn’t worked in the previous months. Some of you may have children transitioning into middle or high school this year and if you’re like me, you might have a child just entering the school world. Change is here! But that doesn’t mean you have to feel like you’re drowning in after school sports schedules, reading logs, and math homework that you live on pizza and fast food for the next 9 months.

Tips for maintaining sanity and a healthy family during the school year:

  1. Pre-make freezer meals. These can be precooked or not. I’ve done both. If you decide to precook I recommend making enough for at least two meals – one for that evening and one to freeze. It’s much easier to make two at once while you already have the stuff out. Raw meats can be put in large freezer bags with chopped veggies and sauces then frozen for later cooking (baked, pressure or slow cooked.)
  2. Plan ahead. Duh. You’ll have a routine. You’re gonna know when football practice is and when the games are. There’s gonna be late nights that cooking isn’t going to happen. Will those nights be the night you save Monday’s leftovers for? Or the night you decide your family will eat out? It’s okay to eat out 1-2 times a week. It’s not okay to just decide you’re gonna be a fast food family every night during the week.
  3. Plan quick meals. Thirty minute meals sound great. But let’s face it, sometimes that’s too long when it’s late and you’ve got starving kids whining at you. Some of my favorite fifteen minute meals to make include: cheese omelets with fruit and whole wheat toast, deli sandwiches and salad, salad (using pre-made salad bags) with pre-cooked chicken, deli meat, or canned tuna, etc. Nothing wrong with a protein shake or protein bar and yogurt/fruit either. Not all kids will enjoy that last option so I may boil them a hot dog and add raw veggies with ranch if that’s what I go for. Just be flexible! Meals are probably not always going to be your traditional family style meat and two sides.
  4. Establish a bed time and routine. I’ve been guilty in the past about not doing this. You know what happens? There isn’t one and every night turns into a circus, ending with sweat and tears. (I’m not talking about my kids!)  If you don’t want this to happen, decide now when bed time will be and then reverse engineer. That’s will determine what time dinner is going to be. It’s not always going to work out perfectly, but establishing this will make life much easier for you and help you make decisions about what responsibilities and activities you participate later on in the school year.
  5. Take a good multivitamin. Yes, I’m advising your whole family do this. It’s important to fill in the nutritional gaps with a high quality vitamin. This can really help with immunity, focus, and sleep quality. Germs and common childhood illnesses are frequent throughout the school year! Lessen your chances with this simple step. I’d love to tell you if you eat a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meats, dairy, and whole grains that you’ll be set. But I’m not that confident in today’s food supply or our ability to consistently eat a perfect diet in today’s busy lifestyle. If you would like recommendations for brands, feel free to contact me. Not all are created equal.
  6. Stock up on fresh fruits and vegetables. And make them convenient to eat. This means they are cut up, washed, and stored in clear containers in the front of the refrigerator. Consider storing apples, oranges, and bananas in a fruit bowl on the kitchen counter. Research shows that this really increases the chances they will be consumed by your family first and more often throughout the week. These will make for much healthier after school snacks over the bag of chips in the pantry! We eat what’s convenient.
  7. If you plan to pre-pack lunches, try to make them for 2-3 days ahead of time. Again, when you’ve got the stuff out already, it saves time. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches last up to three days without going soggy. I’ve tested it myself. And be okay with allowing your kids to eat at school some of the time. I learned a while ago that it’s not healthy for me to be up all hours losing sleep in the kitchen trying to pack everyone the perfect lunch.
  8. Grocery shop once a week. Pick a day and time you’re gonna do it consistently. If possible, not a weekend day in the afternoon. This is the busiest and most stressful time and it will take you the longest. Make a list before you go and get it done. No food in the kitchen = no meals made at home. Some grocery stores are now offering curb side pick up. Do your shopping online, they get it together for you, and you just pick it up at the door. Genius! I have a previous post  if you need help with budgeting.
  9. Eat breakfast. As moms, we are pretty good about making sure our children eat a healthy breakfast before rushing off to school. And then we get to work or go on about our day and never get beyond the cup of coffee for ourselves. Don’t do that. Everyone needs breakfast to maintain a healthy weight, perform better, focus throughout the day, and to prevent unhealthy snacking. While you’re making your children breakfast, take the extra two minutes to make yourself one too. If that’s really a no go, consider a meal replacement. I offer insights and suggestions here. Popular kid’s breakfast options include peanut butter on waffles, peanut butter and jelly (I like uncrustables for a fast fix), oatmeal with brown sugar and raisins, cereal and milk with strawberries or bananas, cheese omelet with fruit, cinnamon raisin toast and a banana, yogurt and cheerios, hard boiled eggs and toast.
  10. Be flexible. The biggest reason people fail at their health goals is because they get stuck in the mentality that their plans needs to be perfect. As soon as something unexpected happens (a child failed their test, you get asked to volunteer for the halloween party, you get a flat tire on the way to school, etc), they throw in the towel. I call this “Plan A,” perfectionism, which really only happens 5% of the time. Plan B is your reality, so flexibility is key because these things are going to come up, 90% of the time. That’s just life. What’s the other 5%? Plan C….reserved for those days when you’re probably gonna stay home, order a pizza, and call it a day. Luckily they only happen occasionally!

    Most important thing is, you make a plan, allow for flexibility, fall off course sometimes, and consistently get back on track. 

Good luck this year, I wish you a year of success and fun filled memories!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Is a very low calorie diet right for me?

Have you ever considered going on a very low calorie diet, aka VLCD, to lose weight? Maybe you don’t even know what it is – rest assured, you probably have heard of them just not by this term. Some of you remember (or at least heard about) when Oprah melted before her audience’s eyes in the 80s after following the Optifast plan. More recently, you or someone you know is probably following the HCG diet plan. Both of these are VCLD plans. So let’s review them.

There are several types in existence on the market today – some with fancy names like the ones mentioned, but they all have one thing in common – they involve consuming 800 calories per day or less. Their means to achieve this intake vary from consuming meal replacements to following strict meal plans and some include taking supplements, injections, and/or appetite suppressants. Their calorie ranges typically go from 500 to 800 per day. The goal is to create rapid weight loss in a short period of time. As you can imagine, these types of diets can be very effective.

I am very familiar with the concept as I personally worked with clients in group and individual settings following a VLCDs for seven years. Our chosen modality was Optifast meal replacements because it is a product that can only be purchased at a clinical facility and a diet like this really needs to be followed under medical supervision. On this program, dieters get a choice of high protein shakes, bars, and soups totaling 800 calories per day. Some required appetite suppressants, but that was determined on an individual basis.

I will mention the HCG diet here too because it is the most common VLCD that I hear about in recent days. Simply put, it’s a 500 calorie strict meal plan paired with injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), a natural hormone that the body produces during pregnancy. Yea, sounds weird to be used for a weight loss diet, huh? Well, according to the website, “HCG releases stored fat to ensure the growing fetus during pregnancy receives the nutrients it needs to grow and develop normally. When HCG is taken in non-pregnant women and men, the body still releases the stored fat. Because there is no fetus present, however, the body uses the stores for energy or eliminates the rest. This enables the body to release stored toxins and fat. Abnormal fat is lost, leaving normal or structural fat and muscle tissue. This means you lose weight in those stubborn areas–hips, thighs, buttocks and upper arms!” 

Unfortunately, this just isn’t true and there is zero scientific backing that it actually works. In fact, if you look at the fine print directly on the website, you will find this little gem of an FDA statement: 

“HCG has no known effects on fat mobilization, appetite or sense of hunger, or body fat distribution. HCG has not been demonstrated to be effective adjunctive therapy in the treatment of obesity. There is no substantial evidence that it increases weight loss beyond that resulting from caloric restriction, that it causes a more attractive or “normal” distribution of fat, or that it decreases the hunger and discomfort associated with calorie restricted diets.”

I don’t like to be the bearer of bad news, but I will tell the truth, even when it hurts. So why do people lose weight on this diet? Because it’s only 500 calories.

During my seven year tenure with the Optfast program, I had the privilege of being a part of some fantastic success stories. People losing 50-100 pounds or more in just twelve short weeks. It was amazing and a true honor to see such transformation in the lives of people who would start the program feeling totally defeated from a lifelong history of yo yo dieting and failed attempts at exercise programs, demoralized by what they saw in the mirror, the number they saw on the scale, and horrified by the clothes they had to wear. Some of them would come because it was their one last big try before considering anything permanent like weight loss surgery. And I would watch them literally melt away before my eyes and go out and do things they never thought they could do again – tandem skydiving, mule rides in the grand canyon, mountain hiking, cross their legs, and tie their shoes.

But after seven years, the program needed to be ended because more than 75% of the success stories became another yo yo story. Almost every single person regained all of their weight back and then often more. It wasn’t for a lack of guidance to a gradual transition back to real food. That was provided along with weekly support. But they had to choose to participate and most didn’t.

Why is this? Because while you are in the weight loss phase, it’s fun, exciting, and you feel on top of the world. The maintenance part is where the real work begins. On a VLCD there is no planning or thinking involved – “eat this/drink this, move on with life and watch the pounds melt off.” In maintenance, you have to deal with real food choices and decisions between fried and grilled chicken, an extra bite of birthday cake, running through the drive through on a busy day, pre-packing lunch for work, and the normal weight fluctuations that come along with it. Exercise is more important than ever, something that is restricted while on the plan. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends those maintaining significant weight loss exercise 45-60 minutes most days.

So in summary, do I recommend VLCD as viable method of weight loss? Yes and no. They are extremely effective when safely monitored by a trained health care professional for getting the weight off and doing it quickly. If someone requires this for a lifesaving surgical operation, say they need to lose weight to repair a life-threatening hernia, remove a cancerous tumor, or it is a precursor to weight loss surgery itself – then it is a fantastic option. Nevertheless, I’ve seen some people have massive success and maintain it off in the long term. But those are the exception and are the rare, dedicated types that follow all of the rules. They calorie count, rarely go off their meal plan, exercise the recommend 60 minutes daily, live an active lifestyle overall, and eat breakfast daily, drink plenty of water, and keep themselves accountable with the scale on a daily basis. They also see their health care providers regularly for outside accountability.

Lifelong weight management is just that – it’s lifelong. No matter how you get it off, it is something that will always have to be at the forefront of your mind. Unfortunately, VLCD plans are too much of a “on the diet, off the diet” approach to create those necessary habits for sustained success.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle and lose weight, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

What should I look for in a protein supplement?

We live busy lives and this often means meals are skipped or we find ourselves in the fast food lines. I’ve said many times, if you are going more than five hours without eating, then you aren’t doing your metabolism any favors – you’ve got to put fuel in the furnace if you want it to keep it burning.

Protein supplements can be a great option to replace those skipped meals. But with the growing health trends, many people get confused about what is good and what is not. So first, let me give you some basic guidelines, whether you are looking at a protein bar or a drink:

Starting with what I like to call “the rule of 20″:

  • Aim for less than 20 grams of sugar per serving
  • Aim for more than 20 grams of protein per serving

You will avoid candy bars and milkshakes disguised as something healthy by following those two simple rules.

Some of my personal favorites include:

Core Power or Core Power Light: Not a lot of added vitamins, which makes them taste a whole lot better, ranging from 20-26 grams of protein and 10-26 grams of sugar. The Light version is definitely the winner here in nutritional content, but I like them both and they each offer different flavors.

Svelte: ready made protein drinks that are dairy free and again, not a whole lot of added junk to make them taste terrible. They are 180 calories and 11 grams of protein, so when I do choose these ones, I make sure to add a hard boiled egg, greek yogurt, or stick cheese to my meal to make sure I get enough protein. They have some good flavors beyond your typical vanilla and chocolate, so check them out.

Slim and Sassy Trim Shake: I have a personal bias because this is from my company, but it contains all natural ingredients, including stevia as it’s sweetener, and only 70 calories per scoop. I am not a fan of it’s low protein content at 8 grams per scoop, but you have the flexibility to make any kind of shake you want because it is a powder, and that’s the point with protein powders. The best part are the two patented ingredients it contains- EssentraTrim, shown in research to help manage cortisol—a stress hormone associated with fat storage in the abdomen, hips, and thighs (who couldn’t use that?!) And Solathin, a special protein extract from natural food sources that supports an increased feeling of satiety (i.e. it makes you feel full, longer, which can be a common issue for some when using liquid meal replacements). Contact me if you want to know how to get it.

Quest bars: you really can’t beat a good tasting bar with 20 grams or more of protein, 1 gram sugar, and an average of 200 calories. Also one of the highest in fiber of bars I’ve seen. They have no added sugar, which is what you will often see in bars like these. Instead, they’re sweetened with sucralose, stevia and/or erythritol and they are gluten and soy free if that’s a concern for you. One caution: if you are sensitive to sugar alcohols, this one may cause you some stomach upset. It never has for me, though.

Think Thin protein bars: another high protein, low sugar bar that comes in at an average of 200-250 calories with 20 grams protein and 0 grams sugar. They are sweetened with sugar alcohols, so again, not everyone will be able to tolerate these but I have never had an issue, personally. Also, you have to be a chocolate and/or peanut butter lover to appreciate this one as all of their flavors contain at least one of those.

How about types of protein?

When choosing a protein meal replacement, be sure you are choosing a high quality protein source that is easily digested and utilized by the body. In order, these are your top sources:

  1. whey protein
  2. soy protein (most dairy-free options on the market)
  3. pea protein (as in green peas, best soy-free vegan option)

How much do you really need?

Unless you are doing some serious body building, 20-30 grams in a single shake or bar will do. Beyond that, the normal body with healthy functioning kidneys will excrete it out because we can only use so much at a time. So save your money on the super-duper 50+ gram protein powders or, if you  really like them, use half a serving instead.

Have a product you love and it wasn’t mentioned here? Let me know in the comments and why you chose it!

P.S. If you aren’t a part of my community, Healthy on a Mission go ahead and ask to join! 

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Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

 

Disclaimer: some of these are affiliate links and I may earn a small percentage if you chose to purchase any of the items recommended above. However, I still would be telling you to give them a try without the potential earnings. Feel free to buy them anywhere you wish!