Foods that naturally boost your metabolism

First off, let’s start with a little background because most people who struggle with their weight are tempted to blame their metabolism for the difficulty they are experiencing. If you have a longstanding history of weight cycling, aka yo yo dieting, a slow metabolism may very well be your problem – for the purposes of this post, that is what the main focus will be. So what happens to your metabolism when you weight cycle, aka “yo yo” diet?

1. First, you lose a lot of fat mass (good thing) but a lot of muscle mass too (unavoidable with rapid weight loss, not a good thing)
2. If it was not a sustainable diet (often it’s not), then the weight piles back on at lightning speed, but this time it is all mostly replaced with fat mass.
3. Fat burns less calories than muscle = your metabolism tanks. Next time you try to diet, it doesn’t come off as easily or fast.
4. Over time, chronic dieters find themselves with a slower and slower metabolism because they keep losing muscle and replacing it with fat. It’s a viscous cycle that eventually makes it almost impossible for weight loss success to occur.

Fear not, if this all sounds too familiar and you think you are in this situation, I’ve done a little research for you and found some promising ways to boost your metabolism, naturally.

  • Tomato juice: in a 2015 study published by the NIH, menopausal women aged 40-60 who consumed 200 ml unsalted tomato juice twice daily experienced an increased in resting energy expenditure (REE) by an average of 400 calories
    Bottom line: drink 200 milliliters twice a day (about 6 ounces twice a day). Hey, it’s not gonna hurt anything.
  • Cinnamon: in a 2012 study published by the International Journal of Preventative Medicine, one group of individuals took cinnamon supplements every day, while the other group took a placebo. After 8 weeks, the cinnamon group lost more weight and body fat than the group taking the placebo.
    Bottom line: add cinnamon to your food or try the pure essential oil for a more concentrated version. Contact me if you are interested in learning more about brands I trust and recommend. remember, supplements are not regulated and therefore, may not be free of contaminants.
  • Coffee: most studies with caffeine in doses of about 100mg per day (6 ounces of coffee) showed an increased calorie burn between 75 and 110 calories for the entire day. There are other sources of caffeine, but coffee is a calorie free source that actually contains some antioxidants.
    Bottom line: have some caffeine before exercise to maximize the calorie burring effects if you are going to try this one. Hey, I love coffee, why  not?
  • Grapefruit: A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food in 2006 showed that obese patients who consumed 8 oz of grapefruit juice or 1/2 of a grapefruit before each meal lost about 3.5 lbs after 12 weeks, without making any other changes to their diets. Participants in the study who consumed a grapefruit capsule before meals also lost weight — but just 2.2 pounds over the 12 weeks. The placebo group did not lose weight.
    Bottom line: drink 8 ounces grapefruit juice, eat 1/2 grapefruit daily, or take a grapefruit capsule with meals (I recommend with 2-3 drops pure essential oil in each one, contact me for recommended brands)
  • Lean Protein: Eggs, chicken, fish, low-fat yogurt, low-fat cheese, turkey
    The “thermic effect of food” (TEF) is the energy we use to digest food into small, absorbable components. Protein burns more calories to digest than carbs & fats. It also takes longer to digest, keeping you fuller longer.
    Bottom line: include 30 grams protein at meals, 8-10 grams of protein at snacks, and eat every 3-5 hours
  • Ginger: promotes digestion and stimulates metabolism, which leads to increased calorie burning. In animal studies, it increased metabolisms by 20%. In human studies, most herbal supplements taken internally increase metabolic rates by 2 to 5% tops. Every little bit helps! In a small, but very interesting pilot study, it was shown to enhance the thermic effect of food and increase the feeling of fullness after a meal. Bottom line: add it to your foods (we aren’t animals); you could also try the pure essential oil for a more concentrated source. If youve never cooked with essential oils, visit my previous post here.

What about appetite suppressants?

There are a few medical options that can help. I’ve talked them in the past along with habits that can help. In the spirit of natural options, here are some effective options I found in  my research:

  • Peppermint Oil: in its food grade, it is used often in the candy and dental industries (seems like an oxymoron, huh?). There is a reason for those after dinner mints! Because of the strong smell, it has an appetite suppressing effect in its purity. Try brushing your teeth after dinner, chewing mint gum while cooking, or diffusing peppermint essential oil to take advantage of this benefit.
  • Water: dehydration often leads to excessive hunger and even sugar cravings, especially chronic dehydration. Aim to consume half of your body weight in ounces of water daily. Add citrus for flavor and extra cleansing benefits. My personal favorite is pure lemon essential oil. Better yet, add fresh squeezed grapefruit juice or grapefruit essential oil.
  • Capsaicin: as in chili peppers. Ever notice you eat less when you have an extra spicy dish? This is why. Unless you are a glutton for punishment, of course.

Let me know what you try and feel free to reach out to me if you are interested in learning more about incorporating essential oils into your weight management routine.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Does your stomach really shrink when you eat less?

As a specialist in weight loss, I hear this phrase a lot, “I just need to shrink my stomach so I can get used to eating less.”

In reality, throughout life, the adult stomach stays about the same, which is the size of a football. However, the stomach is a muscle that can be stretched temporarily to fit more in should the occasion occur. How much we eat tends to be more dictated by habit and hormones rather than size, however.

A little anatomy for you. (I promise, just a little.) There are three very basic parts of the stomach: the top (the fundus), the middle (the body), and the bottom (the pylorus), which is where food empties out into your intestines. The the fundus, is the stretchy part that can expand a bit to allow more food to fit if necessary. It is not likely that the entire body of the stomach is going to expand to allow more food. Back to the football, if you can visualize how much chewed up food that would really mean, it’s quite a lot. However, our body regulates our appetite with hormones that send signals to our brain to tell us whether we’ve eaten enough or not – this is independent of how full the stomach is. Those hormones play a very big role in weight regulation and can be easily over-ridden by outside cues (i.e. the food tastes really good, it’s Thanksgiving, etc.)

Now back to the fundus. This upper muscle is why there’s always room for dessert, but maybe not another immediate meal. It takes about two full hours for the meal to completely empty down to the lower  stomach, out and travel into the small intestine. If you overdo it by eating too much too fast or adding some dessert at the end, that fundus is going to allow for some extra room. For those that habitually overdo it, the tolerance is going to grow over time for allowance. For those that don’t, it’s gonna be more uncomfortable and you’ll be less likely to keep doing it. When you go on a diet and purposely under eat for a couple of weeks, that fundus will become less stretchy and you’ll feel like your stomach has “shrunk.” But it really hasn’t. Weird, huh?

Competitive eaters use this to their advantage and train that muscle over time to allow them to eat a lot in one sitting without puking. I’m not suggesting you do that since I’m assuming you read my blog for help with weight loss, not competitive eating.

In someone who has had weight loss surgery, the body and possibly the pylorus of the stomach has been removed or bypassed, leaving about the size of an egg left. That’s not a lot and it creates some massive restriction. Because this part of the stomach is a muscle and can still stretch, it doesn’t stay that restricted for good. However, the tolerance for over-eating is much less, so the individual usually never gets back to having a football size stomach and still experiences permanent food restriction. If you know someone who had weight loss surgery and regained all or some of their weight because they “stretched their stomach back out,” this may be what’s going on. That’s for another blog post, though.

Hope you found this helpful and enjoyed a little weird science today!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded women striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Foods that stop bloating

You know that feeling. There’s no real reason for your weight to have tipped the scale, but you can’t button your favorite pair of shorts. It’s a fat pants kinda day with a blousy blouse to cover up what you’re feeling looks bit like a pot belly. What if you could eat your way to a thinner stomach and get rid of that bloated feeling? You actually can.

First, it helps to understand why this happens. And it happens to everyone. Often women more so because of hormones. (You probably knew that though!) Pre-menopausal women often feel bloated at varying times of the month with bloating and fluid retention being two common symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

Another reason may be because of dietary habits, either eating too much or too little fiber. Too much fiber, especially if the body is not used to it, can cause excess gas. Too little fiber can cause constipation. It can also happen if you eat foods that are particularly gas forming such as beans, broccoli, cabbage, dried fruit, asparagus, brussel sprouts, artichokes, onions, radishes, cauliflower and fatty or fried foods. The goal is to aim for 25-30 grams of fiber daily, I’ll talk about what that looks like since the typical American diet contains around 10 grams.

A big reason, however, is due to emotional stress. We often give too little credit to the impact that this can have on our physical health. In fact, it is estimated that 25 to 45 million people in the U.S. are affected with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and 2 in 3 of those are women. Irritable Bowel Syndrome is characterized by diarrhea alternating with constipation worsened by stress.

The last one I am going to include here is small bowel bacterial overgrowth. I talk about the importance of probiotics in my recent post here because it can definitely help combat this condition. I’ve seen this mostly in people who have had a recent gastrointestinal surgery and those taking antibiotics for prolonged periods of time.

So now for the good stuff, what foods can you eat to prevent this from happening? Because nobody has time to be feeling bloating and gross.

  • Cayenne pepper: it’s a natural laxative because it stimulates the digestive enzymes to get moving.
  • Ginger: old remedy for soothing stomach discomfort, haven’t we all had ginger ale at some point in our lives for a stomach upset? Sadly, most ginger ales don’t contain any real ginger at all. You are better off boiling and straining some fresh ginger or adding a drop of pure ginger essential oil into some tea or hot water.
  • Fennel: inhibits muscle spasms which calms down symptoms of IBS. Cook your next meal with some of the fresh herb or take 1-2 drops of the pure essential oil in a capsule.
  • Peppermint: similar to fennel, the menthol in peppermint relaxes your muscles and allows you to release any pent up gas or flatulence. Because if you are struggling with reflux, this may aggravate it because it also relaxes the sphincter at the end of the esophagus causing stomach acid to revert back up in those with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD.) Make peppermint tea by adding fresh mint leaves or a drop of peppermint essential oil to a cup of hot black tea. The hot water can also help get things moving along, especially helpful for constipation. Avoid chewing peppermint gum as this can make gas worse since gum may cause you to swallow air.
  • Lemon: acts as a natural diuretic and helps if you are retaining excess fluid. Squeeze some fresh lemons or add a drop of pure lemon essential oil into your water. Avoid drinking your water out of a straw since that can cause you to swallow excess air and make bloating worse.
  • Berries: they are 85 to 95% water, making them great for reducing bloat. They are also an excellent source of soluble fiber, a type of fiber that dissolves in water and one that many of us don’t get enough of in our diets. In order to promote bowel regularity and prevent bloating, we need plenty of this along with insoluble fiber, the kind that does not dissolve in water (so think apple skin and celery.)
  • Watermelon: it’s high in water, making it a natural diuretic to remove excess fluid retention. Also great source of soluble fiber like the berries.
  • Probiotic containing foods: such as yogurt, kefir, and kombucha or add a good supplement to your daily regimen (more on that here).

I’ve given you many ideas that offer additional health properties beyond reducing bloat. That’s one of the many great things about choosing natural options for improving your health. If you are interested in learning more about the essential oil options I mentioned, feel free to reach out to me at one of the links below.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Drink coffee and eat cheese to lower your diabetes risk?

It’s no secret that obesity is an epidemic in the United States and many other developed countries. Because of that, comorbid conditions that are related to extra weight are on the rise. Of particular interest is Type 2 Diabetes, a condition where your body cannot use insulin properly to regulate your blood sugar levels, causing hyperglycemia (aka high blood sugar.)

A quick science lesson to understand what’s going on in someone who has diabetes: insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that is necessary to move glucose (sugar) molecules into our body’s cells for energy. Every cell in the body requires glucose to function. If those glucose molecules are hanging out in the blood stream, they aren’t doing their job and instead, are creating problems like blurred vision, excessive hunger/thirst and fatigue because the body is essentially acting like you haven’t eaten. Chronically high blood sugars lead to heart disease, kidney failure, and permanent nerve damage. No organ can function correctly in a thick, syrupy-like bloodstream.

This is why prevention and management of diabetes is so important. It can absolutely be diet controlled and I’ve witnessed many individuals be able to get off of their diabetes meds with enough weight loss and diet modifications. It’s possible. But always better to not have it to begin with since diabetes is not curable. Note, I’m only referring to Type 2 diabetes here. Type 1 is genetic, usually diagnosed in childhood, and happens when the pancreas produces no insulin at all. It is unrelated to lifestyle factors. 

So what foods increase your risk? Let’s start there since more than 29 million Americans are living with diabetes, and 86 million are living with pre-diabetes. Many of those unaware. Some risk factors like age, genetics, race, and family history are out of our control. However, one thing we can do is choose what we put on our plates. Emerging research has some interesting results on just exactly what to choose and what to ditch.

Foods that increase risk:

  • refined/processed carbohydrates such as crackers, cereal, white bread, cookies, snack cakes, chips, pastries, etc. Interestingly, those marketed as “low-fat, fat-free, and low carb” are also linked to an increased diabetes risk. Why? Because they are still processed!
  • red meat (according to this study “red meat” included beef, pork, and lamb)
  • processed red meat (think bacon, hot dogs, sausage, salami, bologna, etc)
  • sugary drinks like fruit juice with added sugars, soda, fruit punch, lemonade, sweet tea, etc

Foods that have a neutral effect (at least for now):

  • butter
  • poultry (according to the research, the evidence is not clear if it increases or decreases risk)
  • 100% fruit juice without added sugars
  • eggs (can we all just agree it’s okay to eat eggs already?)
  • fish (although may decrease risk in some Asian populations)

Foods that decrease risk:

  • green leafy, vegetables
  • nuts
  • whole grains (unrefined, with the bran still intact)
  • monounsaturated fats (such as avocados, nut butters, mixed nuts)
  • high-fat dairy products (cheese, cream, whole milk, kefir, yogurt) *you read that right, check it out here
  • coffee (add some cream! who else is getting excited? It’s true, really I’m not lying to justify my addiction.)
  • tea
  • alcohol (2 drink limit for men, 1-1.5 drink limit for women, but no need to start if you don’t) *you read that right, too

Much of the research cited is from food frequency questionnaires on large scale studies. As you may know from my previous posts, this method of data collection is not the most reliable, but it’s difficult to control human behavior, especially when it comes to diet over a long period of time. Either way, I think these lists of food gives us some valuable insight on what we can control in our own life.

Lastly, remember that your diabetes risk increases after the age of 45, exercising less than three times per week, being overweight, and having a family history of diabetes. 

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

5 Excuses why we don’t exercise (and how to bust through them)

We all have that one friend who loves to exercise. They swear by it and if they miss a day, everyone knows about it because they claim to feel terrible. You wanna be like them. Well maybe not just like them, but you want to at least want to exercise.But as of this post, you can’t remember the last time you actually did exercise. I’m gonna help you out and just lay all of the most common excuses for why exercise is so easy to justify not doing and then tell you why they are totally false. Sound good? If you read on, you may no longer use these excuses. Fair warning.

Excuse #1: I don’t have enough time. Well join the club. I’m gonna give you a little eye-opener though – think of the last really good book you read. Like, Hunger Games/Fifty Shades Trilogy good (whatever you thing is). How long did it take you to read all 3 books? Be honest. How did you make the time? Stay up all night? Make the kids cook their own dinner? Skip a tv show or two? Here’s the deal- we make time for what we want. It comes down to priorities. I’m not telling you to stop scrolling on Facebook (although we all could probably benefit from less time spent there), but I am telling you to evaluate how you spend your time if this is the excuse you hold near and dear.

Tips to bust through it: Wear a pedometer. I highly recommend the Omron HJ325. It doesn’t cost much and is one of the more accurate step counters I have used it for years. Could be a FitBit if you want to get more fancy and track your heart rate, sleep quality, and time. Exercise is great, but it’s more about being physically active throughout the day. I talk about step goals here. Break it up if you are really that strapped for time. Say, two to three fifteen walk breaks daily instead of one 45 minute walk around the neighborhood. Most of us can find an extra ten or fifteen minutes here and there throughout our day where we are wasting time and could be walking. Step counters make you more aware of how you can fit in “accidental” activity as well (i.e. stairs, parking farther away, walking allll the way over to your colleague’s cubicle instead of sending an email, etc). If you need to sneak in resistance training, keep a set of hand weights by your couch to do while watching television, bring resistance bands to work and learn exercises that are easy to do between phone calls. Multitask!

Excuse #2: I’m exhausted. I get it. I have two kids, church commitments, a part-time job, and I own a business. My day usually starts at 5:30 a.m. and ends around 10:30 p.m. I’m sure you have lots of your own stuff that wears you out. Thing is, being exhausted is often a symptom of physical inactivity. Ouch. Energetic people are in motion.

Tips to bust through it: If you need to get up and go first thing when you wake up, before you have time to talk yourself out of it, then put your shoes by the door and clothes by the bathroom sink where you go to brush your teeth. Make it a habit. When I used to work full time, I would bring my clothes with me to work and go for a long walk or run in the neighborhood behind our building before I got in the car to go home. I knew myself and once I got in the door, not only would the day catch up, but the evening responsibilities would swallow me up too. Other days I would take two or three short walk breaks to total 20-30 minutes a day just to stay awake! Working at a desk job with no windows will zap your energy alone.

Excuse #3: I hurt too much. This is possibly one of the more difficult challenges to bust through. Little known fact: I’m a chronic pain sufferer myself. So again, I get it. Here’s what I know about chronic pain – the more you sit around and think about it, the worse it gets. The less you move, the worse it gets. If you have pain, it is MORE of a reason to move, NOT less. If you’re complaining because of common post exercise muscle soreness, well that’s supposed to happen and it’s a good thing. If you work muscles that aren’t used to moving, they’re naturally gonna revolt on you. Over time, this won’t happen so much as you get stronger. To some degree, you always want to feel some soreness as a sign that you are challenging yourself a bit, but not to a point that it’s painful.

Tips to bust through it: Modify. Not everyone was meant to run cross country or train for triathlons. That’s okay. In fact, one of the best exercises you can do is walk. If you are going for general health, thirty minutes most days is the goal. If you are aiming to lose and maintain weight loss, you’ll need to go for 45-60 minutes most days. If you have an injury that keeps you from walking that much, try bicycling, swimming, or even seeing a physical therapist if you need to. Point is, you can always find something that will work for you if you seek and ask for help. In the long run, you may even experience less pain. Win-win!

Excuse #4: I really don’t like to exercise. This is my favorite! Saying this is like saying “I don’t like food, so I won’t eat.” There are just way too many choices to say that kind of statement. What you are really saying is “I don’t have any reason not to exercise, I just don’t want to.” Sorry, this just isn’t an excuse.

Tips to bust through it: Be willing to try new things. Walking sound boring? Get a partner to pass the time. Try group classes. Change it up and alternate activities. If you like sports, remember that counts as activity, so find a local team that meets for fun. Is the gym intimidating? Go during off hours when not many people are there. You could always skip the gym altogether and stay home and do videos on YouTube, purchase exercise DVDs, or walk outdoors. There are just too many options to try to say you don’t like any of it.

Excuse #5: It’s too hot, too cold, raining, snowing outside. It’s always one of these things outside. Where I live, we get about two weeks of Fall weather (so, when it’s none of those things), another two weeks of semi-cold, and the other 48 weeks are hot and/or raining. So this excuse can be made a lot.

Tips to bust through it: Go early before the elements kick in. Go later in the evening after the sun has gone down. When it’s colder, go mid-day when the sun is at peak. If it’s raining or during the summer when temperatures reach heat-stroke warning highs, be flexible and go indoors. I’ve given you lots of options already of what to do inside. Some gyms offer month to month memberships. If you live by a mall, most of them open early enough before the shops so that you can go walking inside. Don’t worry about looking silly, everyone else is in there doing the same thing!

This just about covers the main excuses for why people don’t exercise. I’ve used them all. You’ve probably used some, too. In addition to the tips I’ve given you to bust through them, I’ve also been able to lessen my pain and increase my energy by using the right vitamins and nutritional supplements. So many of us walk around with vague symptoms like fatigue, achy joints, and daily headaches and don’t realized it can be linked to a simple nutrient deficiency. Our food supply and many of the vitamins on the market today are stripped of the vital nutrients our bodies need to feel our best. If you’d like to know more about the brand I use and trust, feel free to contact me.

So tell me, are you ready to bust through these excuses? If you are, you may want some accountability. I’m beginning a 30 day Fitness Challenge on Monday, July 17, to take us through the rest of summer. If you want in, click here to join and for directions to get in.

P.S. If you’ve been looking for support, you’ve come to the right place, request to join my online support group for all things nutrition and weight loss support.

Follow me on Facebook for daily livestreams

Instagram: TheOilRD

email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Dieting hacks: optical illusions & outta sight, outta mind

A lot of what we eat, sizes we choose, and amounts we serve ourselves are just an illusion. What do I mean by this?

Studies have shown that the most popular drink serving size is medium. However, “medium” is varies from restaurant to restaurant. For example, did you know Starbucks has a “short” size? It’s true. But they don’t advertise it because if they did, they know they would sell mostly “tall” drinks instead of “grande” which in most people’s eyes is considered their “medium” size. Why? Because they advertise tall-grande-venti. If they advertised short-tall-grande, we would all want tall. Interesting, huh?

To drive home this point, the first time I went to my local movie theater, I got a medium soda. However, what they considered medium was about 42 ounces!!! I took my kids yesterday and remembered this, so I ordered a “small” 32 ounces. Still gigantic, but imagine how many people are ordering the 42 ounce sodas simply because of the “medium” label? In a gas station, we call those “big gulps.”

I haven’t been to a bar in a long time….make that about 8 years (about the age of my oldest plus 9 months.) But in study found that experienced bartenders will pour about 20% more alcohol into a short glass versus the same size tall glass if not pre-measured while the average person will pour around 30% more. You think restaurants and bars have more tall glasses because of this? Of course they do! Or at least they are required to use their jiggers! Try this concept with your children for fun: show them 1/2 cup candy in a tall glass and a short glass (clear, see through) and give them a choice. They will choose the tall glass even though its the same amount. Why? Because the tall, slender glass looks like more candy.

How can you apply the optical illusion concept to your life?

  1. Use smaller bowls, plates, and cups so that it appears as if you are eating more than you are. As referenced in my last post, those portions will get lost in large plates and it’s been proven over and over, you will eat more if you eat on large serving dishes.
  2. Divide your snacks into smaller portions. The same researcher mentioned above, found that using visual indicators significantly reduces the amount that we eat. Check out this study where just adding a different color every seventh or fourteenth chip resulted in a 250 calorie difference!! It really can be that easy, folks! This is why single serving and 100 calorie packs are so effective! Get yourself some snack-sized plastic baggies and pre-portion out your snacks or before you sit down to watch television with a bag of chips, put a handful in a bowl first so you can see what you are eating. Do not rely on estimates when you are eating directly from the bag. Take that extra step if you are serious about losing weight.
  3. Make it inconvenient to overeat and put foods you should be limiting out of sight. Remove the candy dish off your desk and put it somewhere you can’t see it (like, in the trash. No really, in the pantry). Get the bag of chips off the top of your refrigerator and put it behind closed cabinet doors. Store your leftovers in an opaque container, in the back of your refrigerator (I don’t care if you forget about them, that’s the kind of the point!) And please, stop storing that ice cream in the freezer in case your grandkids come visit! It’s not good for them, either!
  4. Keep healthy foods convenient and visible. Store fresh fruits and vegetables in clear containers, in the front of your refrigerator, already cut up and ready to eat. Purchase cheese sticks already portioned out and make sure they aren’t buried under stuff in the deli drawer. Boil eggs in advance and peel them so that they are ready for a snack when you’re hungry, again stored in a clear container where you can see them. Replace the cookie jar on the counter with a bowl of fresh fruit. Put some single serve trail mix packages on top of your fridge in place of the chips. Need proof this stuff works? Here’s another study for you on how out of sight, out of mind reduces over-eating- office workers ate 5.6 more chocolates each day when dishes were visible but inconvenient, and 2.9 more chocolates when dishes were convenient but not visible. I’m suggesting you do both (make the food inconvenient and invisible), but according to this study, it’s the visibility that really counts.

Even if you pick one or two of these hacks to try, I think you will see some results in your life. Let me know in the comments what you try and how it’s helping you. Remember, it’s not willpower, it’s skill-power. I’m going to keep emphasizing that point because I want you to understand that you have the power within yourself to see the results that you desire.

P.S. Love to eat out but not sure how to fit it in with your health and wellness goals? Get these tips  sent to your inbox and master the dieting hacks even when you’re at restaurants!

P.P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Diet hacks for eating less and feeling full

Portion control. Do you cringe when you hear that? It’s more like portion distortion. The bigger is better mentality has surfaced everywhere – smart phones, television screens, computer monitors, boobs (yea, I said it), muscles, tires, cars, houses, and on and on.

Here’s the deal….most of us don’t even know what a portion of any food actually is. And when we do find out, it’s laughable. Why is that? Well, because we have become conditioned to super-sized servings. Now, a portion is an actual MEASURED amount. A serving is whatever you put on your plate. They are two very different things. So here’s a little education for you:

1 portion of carbohydrate = 1/2 cup (cooked, plain cereal like oatmeal/grits, potatoes, pasta corn, peas, beans) (80 calories) *rice is an exception at only 1/3 cup per serving

1 portion non starchy vegetable = 1 cup raw or 1/2 cup cooked, but really – unlimited (25 calories)

1 portion fresh fruit = 1 cup raw, 1 cup frozen or 1/2 cup canned (60 calories)

1 portion added fat = 1 teaspoon (oil, butter) (100 calories)

1 portion nut butter or avocado, sour cream = 1 tablespoon (90 calories)

1 portion nuts = 1/4 cup (170 calories)

1 portion dairy (milk, plain yogurt, cottage cheese) = 1 cup (110 calories)

1 portion of lean meat (chicken, fish, pork tenderloin, egg) = 3 ounces  or 1 egg (110 calories)

1 portion of high fat meat (beef, ribs, fatty fish) = 1 1/2 ounces (110 calories)

Note these are all estimates and foods vary A LOT depending on added sugars and fats or lack thereof. So reading labels is important too. But the key here is to understand that you are probably over-eating. For example, in a restaurant, the smallest sirloin is 9 ounces, that’s SIX TIMES as much as a “portion size”. I’m not saying you can only eat 1 1/2 ounces, but calories count and they add up fast if you aren’t paying attention. It’s really no wonder how people gain weight easily when they are eating out frequently.

But it’s not just restaurants to blame. It’s how we cook at home, too. For instance, when you make pasta – do you cook the entire box? Have you ever looked at the label? A pound of pasta is enough to feed sixteen people if you are sticking to the 1/2 cup serving. If you go with the box’s suggested serving of two ounces or 1 cup each, then you are cooking for eight people. I’m guessing you aren’t feeding that many people for dinner on a regular basis though. So how do you deal without feeling hungry all the time?

Here are some tried and true tricks:

  1. Realize this is not willpower. I repeat – NOT willpower. It’s skill-power. So first of all, STOP cooking for an army and start cooking for the number of people having the actual dinner. I once counseled a couple that did this and each lost forty pounds without changing what they were eating. If you really don’t want to do this, then plan for leftovers, but make two pans/pots/casseroles and immediately put one in the freezer or whatever you need to do BEFORE you start eating. Remove that temptation.
  2. Use smaller plates – as in six to eight inch plates. You know those salad plates you have that came with your ten inch dinner plates. Yeah, those ones. In a study done by food scientist and researcher, Brian Wansink, he explored how an optical illusion leads us to make inaccurate estimates of serving size, depending on what size plate they are presented on. The more “white space” around the circle, the smaller it appears and thus, we feel the need to fill the plate to the edges. Same goes with bowls, in another study he conducted at a health and fitness camp, campers who were given larger bowls served and consumed 16% more cereal than those given smaller bowls. Despite the fact that those campers were eating more, they estimated eating 7% less than the group eating from the smaller bowls. Interesting, huh?
  3. Allow a good twenty minutes to finish your first plate before getting seconds. It takes your brain that long to register that you have eaten. Now I do understand that it can be quite annoying to eat slow if you are a naturally fast eater. So I suggest if you zip through your meal in five to ten minutes, then wait for the next ten minutes to pass before you decide if you truly need a second helping. And if you do, go for veggies first since they are the lowest in calories.
  4. Use the plate method and shift the calorie make up on your plate. This goes with the concept of a volumetrics type diet. Notice how vegetables only have twenty-five calories per portion? But the starchy carbohydrates have eighty? And that’s assuming you didn’t load them up with gravy, butter, or other fats. Same with meats, 110 calories per one to two ounces? Fill up half of your plate with non-starchy vegetables (so NOT corn/peas/potatoes), a third with high fiber carbohydrates, and the rest with a meat, preferably a lean meat. If it’s breakfast time, fill that half with fruits. Make sense? You are eating more low calorie foods and less high calorie foods, but not sacrificing volume. Another way of looking at is like this: one cup of salad dressing is around 1440 calories, one cup of nuts is 680 calories, one cup of fat free milk is 90 calories and one cup of raw vegetables is 25 calories. In other words, a large plate of pasta is going to be a ton more calories than a plate of salad. Here’s the issue with most of us: usually our plates are half meat (often high fat), half starch, and vegetables as an afterthought or something starchy like corn (at least here in the south!) Personally, I prefer the plate method over measuring my food. I got kids and if I don’t inhale my food, I don’t eat before there’s an explosion of a hot mess in my house. Like many of you I’m sure, I don’t get the luxury of measuring, weighing, and taking my time to eat dinner – so I’m thankful for these hacks that still make it possible to eat well.

Lastly, remember that the above will not work if you arrive to the dinner table starving. The day starts with a healthy breakfast, planned out high protein snacks and a healthy lunch. If you didn’t eat high protein, healthy foods every three to five hours earlier in the day, you can forget about the rest because you will want to eat the refrigerator door by the time you sit down for dinner and a six inch plate will just piss you off. For tips on preplanning meals – head over to this previous post on how to do that.

P.S. Love to eat out but not sure how to fit it in with your health and wellness goals? Get these tips  sent to your inbox and hopefully they will help you out.

P.P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Could you go 30 days without sugar?

We just finished a 30 day no sugar challenge in my online community. The results were pretty amazing. Weight loss plateaus were broken, shopping habits were changed, and more importantly, carbohydrates were no longer demonized.

What do I mean by this?

In the beginning, there was some confusion about what was okay and what was not. The challenge was meant to be a simple one – no added sugars of any kind (including honey, table sugar – white, brown, etc, agave, maple syrup) and no refined or processed carbohydrates. The first one was pretty easy to grasp. The second category was more difficult because, in the dieting world, we become conditioned to categorizing foods into two groups: carbohydrates (bad) and everything else (good).

It was a fun learning process. This was the list of disallowed foods in addition to added sugars: 
-chips/french fries (anything that’s made from a potato but isn’t an actual potato)
-pretzels
-cookies/brownies
-sweetened coffee creamer
-candy
-crackers
-cake/snack cakes/snack bars
-white pasta (whole grain is fine, couscous which is a tiny form of pasta is also good, quinoa also good)
-white breads and buns (whole grains are fine)
-white bagels and english muffins
-white waffles (there are very few whole grain waffle varieties available)

-white rice (again, whole grain/wild is good)-most cereals (oats/oatmeal and whole grain cereals like oat bran are fine)-ice cream/sherbet/popsicles (try frozen fruit)

The learning process began when we found snack items, like granola bars and cereal, that listed the initial ingredient as “whole grain” and other ingredients that were natural and whole. They were allowed. It was also okay to eat white potatoes and corn – because, HELLO! These are real food! Nothing processed there!

I know what you may be thinking, why no honey? Because that’s what everyone else was thinking, too. It’s got beneficial health properties so why wasn’t it included? But as my friend and fellow challenger said, “we are trying to get rid of the sugar monster!” And when consumed, honey is still converted into sugar, still tastes sweet, and still activates that addiction that is sparked in most of us to keep eating more. That was the whole point of this challenge. To stop the powerful addiction that is sugar. I talk about this more in a previous post – if you ever wondered if it’s a real thing, it is.

 The other thing you may have noticed is that this was the only thing that was changed for the entire 30 days and RESULTS HAPPENED.  I did that on purpose. Oftentimes, it seems like there are more decisions that need to happen to make a real difference. Why didn’t the challenge include choosing more lean means, cutting out fried foods, or eating more fruits and veggies? While all of that stuff is important to a healthy diet, I don’t think as many would have stuck it out if they had to change it all in the 30 days.

 Pick one thing to change and surprise yourself at how consistent you are and what kind of results you get because of it.

For their specific results and testimonies, head over here and check it out!

P.S. The challenge in our group is over. But that doesn’t mean you can’t give it a go. We’d love to have and support you if you’re game! Go ahead and join my free online support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Is a very low calorie diet right for me?

Have you ever considered going on a very low calorie diet, aka VLCD, to lose weight? Maybe you don’t even know what it is – rest assured, you probably have heard of them just not by this term. Some of you remember (or at least heard about) when Oprah melted before her audience’s eyes in the 80s after following the Optifast plan. More recently, you or someone you know is probably following the HCG diet plan. Both of these are VCLD plans. So let’s review them.

There are several types in existence on the market today – some with fancy names like the ones mentioned, but they all have one thing in common – they involve consuming 800 calories per day or less. Their means to achieve this intake vary from consuming meal replacements to following strict meal plans and some include taking supplements, injections, and/or appetite suppressants. Their calorie ranges typically go from 500 to 800 per day. The goal is to create rapid weight loss in a short period of time. As you can imagine, these types of diets can be very effective.

I am very familiar with the concept as I personally worked with clients in group and individual settings following a VLCDs for seven years. Our chosen modality was Optifast meal replacements because it is a product that can only be purchased at a clinical facility and a diet like this really needs to be followed under medical supervision. On this program, dieters get a choice of high protein shakes, bars, and soups totaling 800 calories per day. Some required appetite suppressants, but that was determined on an individual basis.

I will mention the HCG diet here too because it is the most common VLCD that I hear about in recent days. Simply put, it’s a 500 calorie strict meal plan paired with injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), a natural hormone that the body produces during pregnancy. Yea, sounds weird to be used for a weight loss diet, huh? Well, according to the website, “HCG releases stored fat to ensure the growing fetus during pregnancy receives the nutrients it needs to grow and develop normally. When HCG is taken in non-pregnant women and men, the body still releases the stored fat. Because there is no fetus present, however, the body uses the stores for energy or eliminates the rest. This enables the body to release stored toxins and fat. Abnormal fat is lost, leaving normal or structural fat and muscle tissue. This means you lose weight in those stubborn areas–hips, thighs, buttocks and upper arms!” 

Unfortunately, this just isn’t true and there is zero scientific backing that it actually works. In fact, if you look at the fine print directly on the website, you will find this little gem of an FDA statement: 

“HCG has no known effects on fat mobilization, appetite or sense of hunger, or body fat distribution. HCG has not been demonstrated to be effective adjunctive therapy in the treatment of obesity. There is no substantial evidence that it increases weight loss beyond that resulting from caloric restriction, that it causes a more attractive or “normal” distribution of fat, or that it decreases the hunger and discomfort associated with calorie restricted diets.”

I don’t like to be the bearer of bad news, but I will tell the truth, even when it hurts. So why do people lose weight on this diet? Because it’s only 500 calories.

During my seven year tenure with the Optfast program, I had the privilege of being a part of some fantastic success stories. People losing 50-100 pounds or more in just twelve short weeks. It was amazing and a true honor to see such transformation in the lives of people who would start the program feeling totally defeated from a lifelong history of yo yo dieting and failed attempts at exercise programs, demoralized by what they saw in the mirror, the number they saw on the scale, and horrified by the clothes they had to wear. Some of them would come because it was their one last big try before considering anything permanent like weight loss surgery. And I would watch them literally melt away before my eyes and go out and do things they never thought they could do again – tandem skydiving, mule rides in the grand canyon, mountain hiking, cross their legs, and tie their shoes.

But after seven years, the program needed to be ended because more than 75% of the success stories became another yo yo story. Almost every single person regained all of their weight back and then often more. It wasn’t for a lack of guidance to a gradual transition back to real food. That was provided along with weekly support. But they had to choose to participate and most didn’t.

Why is this? Because while you are in the weight loss phase, it’s fun, exciting, and you feel on top of the world. The maintenance part is where the real work begins. On a VLCD there is no planning or thinking involved – “eat this/drink this, move on with life and watch the pounds melt off.” In maintenance, you have to deal with real food choices and decisions between fried and grilled chicken, an extra bite of birthday cake, running through the drive through on a busy day, pre-packing lunch for work, and the normal weight fluctuations that come along with it. Exercise is more important than ever, something that is restricted while on the plan. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends those maintaining significant weight loss exercise 45-60 minutes most days.

So in summary, do I recommend VLCD as viable method of weight loss? Yes and no. They are extremely effective when safely monitored by a trained health care professional for getting the weight off and doing it quickly. If someone requires this for a lifesaving surgical operation, say they need to lose weight to repair a life-threatening hernia, remove a cancerous tumor, or it is a precursor to weight loss surgery itself – then it is a fantastic option. Nevertheless, I’ve seen some people have massive success and maintain it off in the long term. But those are the exception and are the rare, dedicated types that follow all of the rules. They calorie count, rarely go off their meal plan, exercise the recommend 60 minutes daily, live an active lifestyle overall, and eat breakfast daily, drink plenty of water, and keep themselves accountable with the scale on a daily basis. They also see their health care providers regularly for outside accountability.

Lifelong weight management is just that – it’s lifelong. No matter how you get it off, it is something that will always have to be at the forefront of your mind. Unfortunately, VLCD plans are too much of a “on the diet, off the diet” approach to create those necessary habits for sustained success.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle and lose weight, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

You make time for what you want

It’s true. I know we hate to admit it. But think about the last really good fiction novel you read. You stayed up until all hours of the night just to read “one more chapter,” didn’t you? I know you did because I’ve done it, too. Ever been on a Netflix binge? And then it was suddenly okay for the kids to watch a second movie in a row to give you another 90 minutes to find out if Glen was still alive?

How much time today have you spent scrolling through social media feeds only to learn what your old high school acquaintance had for dinner last night, your neighbor’s cat did to the carpet, and the hair stylist you used to go to five years ago had to say about her ex boyfriend? Or why your Aunt Sally who lives three states away that you haven’t seen in years hates it when people use bad grammar.

3 hours. That’s the amount of time the average person spends on social media per day mindlessly scrolling through miles of cats, babies, baby showers for people we haven’t spoken to in 10 years, meals, bathroom selfies, rainbows, the heart shaped crack in the sidewalk, the political rant, the declaration of a Facebook fast, post work out selfies, a desperate plea to buy my wrap, lipstick, join my team, try a sample, try the best thing since sliced bread, and on and on and on. And it does nothing for us but s

We all want and need more time. And money. Well most of us. Some have figured out that more time IS more money. What could you do with 3 extra hours a day? Business owners, what money making activities could you do that would totally transform your product, service, and/or marketing? Moms, what kind of house cleaning, quality time with kids, meal prep, or SLEEP (hallelujah!) could you get? Those of you trying to lose weight or get healthier? What kind of exercise habits could you establish, cooking style would you try, recipes might you research, or eating habits could you try (say sitting down at the table, taking that 20 minutes to eat that you keep hearing is so much better for your body?)

So yeah. Start with where you spend your time. Spend it wisely and you may see your bank account go up.

I’ll be dedicating future posts on this concept. Because conventional thinking tells us we need to do everything ourselves to save a dollar. We live in the age of DIY, after all. But I’m challenging you to value your TIME first. In turn, you might be surprised at how the money falls into place.

Need extra help in this area? A book I highly recommend is The Miracle Morning  or The Miracle Morning for Network Marketers. How you start your day sets you up for how you will end your day. If you are like me, it’s more practical to listen to audiobooks, but do what works best for you.