New year, new you – time for a detox?

I’ve been quiet on here this month, enjoying the holidays with my family and frankly, getting slammed with my home business. But 2018 is just around the corner and I know many of you are thinking about your health goals. One of the most popular goals, besides weight loss, is whole body detox. We’re coming off the season where there’s no shortage of sugar, fat, and booze and that leaves many of us feeling a bit bloated and gross.

There are a lot of options out there, though. And if you aren’t careful, you could be wasting your time and money, if not participating in something downright dangerous. So let’s start with some basics if you’re going to do this thing right.

It’s important to remember that is essence, it is our organs that are “detoxing” our bodies and they do it every minute of every day. There is no magical outside substance that will do that for you because your body was already designed to do everything it was meant to sustain your life on the daily. However, our daily habits bring us out of balance often and makes our organs work overtime, leading to disease – such as diabetes, high blood pressure, renal failure, and certain types of cancers, to name a few. We are constantly introducing toxins into our systems forcing our organs to work harder than they should.

A detox should last about thirty days. Anything less is a waste of your precious time and just dumb. You’ll lose some water weight and go right back to old habits the following days or weeks when the detox period is over. It’s also just not long enough to really feel any difference that will create any meaningful habit changes. Why do a detox if you aren’t going to carry some new, beneficial habits with you for months after? It really doesn’t need to go longer than thirty days, either, however. Some habits you bring in over the thirty days would help to keep but not all are totally necessary.

Some foods need to be eliminated in this time period, for obvious reasons, including:

Sugar: I’ve written in past articles why sugar is so very addicting and has been clinically proven so. When you eat sugar, it almost immediately spikes your blood stream levels, causing your pancreas to start working overtime to produce insulin to get that sugar into your body’s cells for energy. But guess what? Sugar is very concentrated in calories and it’s likely you’ve consumed way too much energy than is needed for those cells. The rest is then stored in the liver for later use, which collects as fat and can create a fatty liver if not used. Problem is we habitually over-eat calories and it also collects in our abdomen in the form of fat tissue. This is becoming a pretty big problem in America today, actually. The pancreas eventually putters out trying to keep up, leading to type 2 diabetes. Not a happy subject, but I see this every single day as a dietitian.

Processed carbohydrates: these are converted into sugar when consumed, so same thing as above. It’s not just about avoiding table sugar. Earlier this year, I worked with a group of individuals who took a challenge and avoided these types of foods for thirty days, the results were amazing. They felt more energized, lost weight, and their cravings for sugar diminished. These cravings we experience are caused by dramatic blood sugar fluctuations from eating high sugar foods with low nutritional value. As I mentioned above, they get converted quickly to sugar in your blood stream, but just as quickly your pancreas is working to produce insulin to get it out, which causes a sharp drop in your blood sugar levels. This makes you feel pretty crappy and tired, which means you want more to feel better. It’s a viscous cycle.

Alcohol: most of us understand that this is processed by the liver. Too much of it starts to damage the liver (duh), but during a detox it kinda defeats the purpose if you aren’t abstaining. When we drinking alcohol, our body prioritizes the elimination of it and can’t focus on much of anything else. It’s a good recipe for weight gain, liver cirrhosis (hardening of your liver), and pancreatitis (inflammation.)

Caffeine: this one hurts me. I get it. But caffeine is an extremely addictive stimulant. When consumed in excess, it causes an irritable bowel, disruptive sleep patterns, irregular heart beat, and increased anxiety – all counterproductive to the detoxification process. Believe it or not, it also causes pretty wide fluctuations in your energy levels. If you’ve tried detoxing before and didn’t experience increased energy, it could be because you didn’t give up caffeine. Drinking more water is the most beneficial way to improve energy levels.

Let’s talk about what you do include and why, this is the fun part, right?

  1. Water with lemon. Lots of it. Aim for half of your body weight (pounds) in ounces each day. Water is a natural diuretic and so is lemon. This helps your kidneys out. They need flushing so they don’t get backed up. Your kidneys are probably one of the most important filtering systems in your body and I can’t tell you how many people I see regularly that land themselves in the hospital with temporary failure because they got dehydrated. It’s well over 50% of the people I see every single day. Other problems that happen regularly are fatigue, joint and back pain, headaches, and sweet cravings. I recommend pure lemon essential oil since it comes from the rind rather than the juice and it’s way more concentrated than a squeeze from the fruit. One drop of lemon essential oil is equivalent to the juice of thirty lemons (but not nearly as sour!) It is also known for supporting healthy lungs and digestive system.
  2. Fresh fruits and vegetables. When IS the last time you consumed five (or more) in one day? Be honest. Aim for the rainbow, or at least vary your colors. Plant based foods get their pigments from the nutrients they provide which means if you are eating a variety of colors, you are also getting a variety of nutrients in addition to fiber.
  3. A good multivitamin. This can be tough to find. A couple of years ago, some of the country’s most popular retailers of supplements were busted for selling fake products over the counter. In fact, when tested, only 22% of their supplements actually had any of their claimed product in them at all. Walmart being the worst at only 4% of their products containing what they claimed. Ultimately, they settled in court to keep the attorney general quiet – I’m not too confident that means they grew a conscience about what they are selling, though.
  4. Whole food enzymes. Again, lets help the body out, we’ve been eating low nutritional value foods and now we’re including fresh plant based foods. Unfortunately, today’s food supply is still a bit sub-par in the vitamin/mineral world and even fresh fruits and vegetables are sprouting up from nutrient-depleted soil. Whole food enzymes break down the food and help our bodies utilize the nutrient they provide easier. If you struggle from vague health symptoms like fatigue, joint discomforts, or headaches, it could be because you are lacking certain nutrients that your body has been missing out on.
  5. Probiotics: so many benefits here, I did a blog post a few months ago on how everybody should be taking some. For the purposes of a detox, they aid the digestive and immune systems. We are exposed to environmental toxins regularly, our immune system works overtime, especially during the winter. Let’s help it out, shall we?
  6. Pure essential oils. Essential oils are a fantastic way to support the body’s natural capability of cleansing itself. The organs we are focusing on here are our liver, colon, kidneys, lungs, and skin. Like supplements, the essential oil industry can be tricky so it’s important you know the source you are buying from. But when unadulterated and without synthetic additives, they can prove to be an important part of your detox program. Rosemary, cilantro, and juniper berry essential oils are well known for supporting the liver in it’s normal processes. Geranium and tangerine essential oils are helpful in supporting the body’s systems as a whole as it removes unwanted substances. Think of it as bringing things into balance after weeks (maybe months) of use and abuse with unhealthy foods and habits such as lack of exercise, smoking, environmental threats, and even medication use. My favorite product is a detoxification blend that contains all five of these essential oils that can be taken in a soft-gel form.
  7. Omega 3 fats: great for reducing inflammation, often exacerbated by eating highly processed foods, alcohol, and red meats. Let’s help the body out by adding this in while removing the inflammatory foods, why don’t we? Be sure you are consuming a source rich in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA and DHA) to get the maximum benefit. You could always consume fish three times a week, but remember this is a detox and we are going for the concentrated versions. Ok? I personally choose to take the supplements daily because I never eat fish that often and I’ve experience the benefits well enough I don’t want to stop.

In essence, our bodies have everything we need to survive and cleanse itself out from our lungs to our stomach to our intestines, kidneys, and liver. They all have a job to do filtering out the air we breath, food we eat, liquids we drink, and bacteria we come into contact with. Even so, we can feel out of balance in today’s world as we are consistently pummeled with toxic threats. If you feel like it’s time for a reboot, feel free to contact me for more information about how to schedule supplements, the brands I trust, and meal schedule to follow so you get the most out of your detox.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

 

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Foods that stop bloating

You know that feeling. There’s no real reason for your weight to have tipped the scale, but you can’t button your favorite pair of shorts. It’s a fat pants kinda day with a blousy blouse to cover up what you’re feeling looks bit like a pot belly. What if you could eat your way to a thinner stomach and get rid of that bloated feeling? You actually can.

First, it helps to understand why this happens. And it happens to everyone. Often women more so because of hormones. (You probably knew that though!) Pre-menopausal women often feel bloated at varying times of the month with bloating and fluid retention being two common symptoms of premenstrual syndrome.

Another reason may be because of dietary habits, either eating too much or too little fiber. Too much fiber, especially if the body is not used to it, can cause excess gas. Too little fiber can cause constipation. It can also happen if you eat foods that are particularly gas forming such as beans, broccoli, cabbage, dried fruit, asparagus, brussel sprouts, artichokes, onions, radishes, cauliflower and fatty or fried foods. The goal is to aim for 25-30 grams of fiber daily, I’ll talk about what that looks like since the typical American diet contains around 10 grams.

A big reason, however, is due to emotional stress. We often give too little credit to the impact that this can have on our physical health. In fact, it is estimated that 25 to 45 million people in the U.S. are affected with Irritable Bowel Syndrome and 2 in 3 of those are women. Irritable Bowel Syndrome is characterized by diarrhea alternating with constipation worsened by stress.

The last one I am going to include here is small bowel bacterial overgrowth. I talk about the importance of probiotics in my recent post here because it can definitely help combat this condition. I’ve seen this mostly in people who have had a recent gastrointestinal surgery and those taking antibiotics for prolonged periods of time.

So now for the good stuff, what foods can you eat to prevent this from happening? Because nobody has time to be feeling bloating and gross.

  • Cayenne pepper: it’s a natural laxative because it stimulates the digestive enzymes to get moving.
  • Ginger: old remedy for soothing stomach discomfort, haven’t we all had ginger ale at some point in our lives for a stomach upset? Sadly, most ginger ales don’t contain any real ginger at all. You are better off boiling and straining some fresh ginger or adding a drop of pure ginger essential oil into some tea or hot water.
  • Fennel: inhibits muscle spasms which calms down symptoms of IBS. Cook your next meal with some of the fresh herb or take 1-2 drops of the pure essential oil in a capsule.
  • Peppermint: similar to fennel, the menthol in peppermint relaxes your muscles and allows you to release any pent up gas or flatulence. Because if you are struggling with reflux, this may aggravate it because it also relaxes the sphincter at the end of the esophagus causing stomach acid to revert back up in those with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD.) Make peppermint tea by adding fresh mint leaves or a drop of peppermint essential oil to a cup of hot black tea. The hot water can also help get things moving along, especially helpful for constipation. Avoid chewing peppermint gum as this can make gas worse since gum may cause you to swallow air.
  • Lemon: acts as a natural diuretic and helps if you are retaining excess fluid. Squeeze some fresh lemons or add a drop of pure lemon essential oil into your water. Avoid drinking your water out of a straw since that can cause you to swallow excess air and make bloating worse.
  • Berries: they are 85 to 95% water, making them great for reducing bloat. They are also an excellent source of soluble fiber, a type of fiber that dissolves in water and one that many of us don’t get enough of in our diets. In order to promote bowel regularity and prevent bloating, we need plenty of this along with insoluble fiber, the kind that does not dissolve in water (so think apple skin and celery.)
  • Watermelon: it’s high in water, making it a natural diuretic to remove excess fluid retention. Also great source of soluble fiber like the berries.
  • Probiotic containing foods: such as yogurt, kefir, and kombucha or add a good supplement to your daily regimen (more on that here).

I’ve given you many ideas that offer additional health properties beyond reducing bloat. That’s one of the many great things about choosing natural options for improving your health. If you are interested in learning more about the essential oil options I mentioned, feel free to reach out to me at one of the links below.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Take probiotics to stop sneezing and fidgeting?

Gut health seems to be getting the spotlight in the past several years. People are more concerned than ever about what’s going on in their insides. And this has made probiotics of particular interest. But why? In my early career days, the only people we would recommend probiotics to were those with intestinal infections and those on heavy doses of antibiotics.

Today, it’s as common to take probiotics as it is to take a multivitamin. Why? Let’s first review what exactly a probiotic is before we begin to understand some of the reasons why people would want to consider taking them as a daily supplement. Probiotics contain microorganisms, most of which are bacteria similar to the beneficial bacteria that occur naturally in the human gut. In other words, beneficial = does good things. Sounds really scientific, huh? The most-studied species include Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, and Saccharomyces. (yeah, I know those do sound really scientific.)

To keep this post reasonably short, I’m going to go over the top four reasons my readers said they take probiotics and discuss them here.

  • They improve digestive regularity. You’ve probably heard this one. Makes sense, right? If the natural and beneficial bacteria that are similar to probiotics are found in the gut, they should benefit our bowel habits. Don’t ya think? What does the research say, though? “There is high-quality evidence that probiotics are effective for acute infectious diarrhea, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea, hepatic encephalopathy, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, functional gastrointestinal disorders, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Conversely, there is evidence that probiotics are not effective for acute pancreatitis and crohn’s disease.” C. diff is bad news and highly contagious diarrhea. It can be big problem in hospitals and can really keep someone there for a while with pretty severe dehydration if not handled correctly. It will put you out for quite some time if you are unfortunate enough to get it. Good news is, probiotics are safe for infants, children, adults, and older patients. I’m going to add here, that probiotics do not survive in an acidic and hostile stomach environment. We don’t necessarily need the billion gazillion cells that most available brands pride themselves on. Problem is, the majority of the them don’t survive the stomach acid long enough to reach the small intestine where they are needed. The billions of live cells are present in these brands in hopes that some will make it to the end. We don’t actually know how many that is. Perhaps that’s why some people experience benefits and others do not.
  • They support our immune health.  Our digestive system is not only responsible for the digestion and absorption of food nutrients, but it provides protection against potentially harmful antigens (such as toxins, bacteria, virus, foreign blood cells.) Several available research data points to the conclusion that probiotics can be used as innovative tools for treating dysfunctions of the gut mucosal barrier, including acute gastroenteritis (i.e. food poising or a “stomach bug”), food allergies, and inflammatory bowel disease (i.e. diverticulosis). You’ve probably been told at some point in your life to take probiotics during or after a course of antibiotics to restore the healthy bacteria that was killed off. We need them.
  • May help alleviate allergy symptoms. Infants are more susceptible to allergic responses because their immune systems and digestive symptoms are still developing. The types of bacteria and amounts present depend on several different factors including whether the child was born by cesarean or vaginally, breastfed or formula fed, age they were introduced to table food and types of food, antibiotic exposure, and of course genetics. This review examined the available research and found that indeed probiotics did improve their allergic responses and reduced symptoms of common ailments like eczema, allergic rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis. When infants were given Lctbs rhamnosus for the first 2 years of life they had a significant reduction by approximately half in the prevalence of eczema. And this study showed that when adults and children suffering from allergic rhinitis took therapeutic doses of Lactobacillus paracasei, they experienced significant improvements also.

In another study , they gave children at a daycare fermented milk containing lactobacillus casei (think kefir) and saw marked improvements as well, but not in those children with asthma. Pretty cool, huh? More research still needs to be done in spite of these exciting results since not all come to the same conclusion and they weren’t done on large scales. It doesn’t hurt to go ahead and take them though.

  • Reduce Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Say what?! It’s true. Recent experimental evidence suggests that gut microbiota may alter function within the nervous system. This particular study published in 2015 followed 75 children from pre-birth to age thirteen and supplemented the experimental group from four weeks before birth (the mom) to six months of age with Lactobacillus rhamnosus and the control group with placebo. They initially examined the differences in gut microbiota in the children at birth and later found a correlation to those who were later diagnosed with either ADHD or Asperger’s Syndrome. Turns out, those affected had a significantly lower amount of Bifidobacterium longum at the age of three months than the children that did not receive a diagnosis. At the end of the thirteen years, six out of thirty five children in the placebo group were diagnosed with ADHD or AS while NONE of the children in the probiotic group were. 

That’s pretty compelling, but what I found the most profound of all was this gem of a study right here, published in 2003. It was only performed on twenty children age 7-12, but I don’t care. What they found was amazing. Supplementing these kids for just four weeks with a mix of B vitamins, Vitamin C, minerals (iron, copper), phytonutrients, amino acids, essential fatty acids, phospholipids, and probiotics specifically chosen to address the ADHD biochemical risk factors was found to be just as affective as ritalin treatment. We’re talking behaviors like focus, consistency, fidgeting, impulsiveness, stamina, vigilance, and speed. I’m impressed. You may see a future blog post on this topic soon.

What to do with all of this information? For some immunocompromised individuals (those on chemotherapy, HIV patients, or those receiving organ transplants) you may want to ask you doctor before you start any new supplements. Otherwise, I’ve given you lots of good reasons to add probiotics into your daily regimen. If you choose a supplement, be sure to read the label and follow the directions. If you prefer to start with adding some food sources, here are some good options:

Kefir: fermented milk

Yogurt: you know what this is, but I recommend greek because of its high protein content

Kombucha: fermented black tea

Sauerkraut: fermented cabbage

Apple cider vinegar: the kind with floaty things on the bottom, not the cheap stuff, use as a salad dressing

Tempeh: a fermented soybean product, thicker and firmer than tofu

Miso: a traditional Japanese paste-like spice made from soybeans and barely with koji (fungus…yum)

Fermented pickles: these won’t be shelf stable, those are pasteurized and do not contain live cultures (so think gherkins, not the ones pickled in vinegar but rather salt and water)

Sourdough bread: did I just give you a reason to eat bread?? Sort of. The yeast is fermented, creating the “sour” taste and making it easier to digest than other breads

Aged, soft cheese: such as cheddar, gouda, parmesan, and swiss (note, most others will not contain live, active cultures)

Kimchi: a spicy, korean dish made up of mostly cabbage and other fermented vegetables

Have fun trying some of these new foods if you are interested in expanding into some of the ethnic or vegetarian options. If you are interested in what brand of probiotic supplement I use and recommend, feel free to reach out to me via the links below.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Do you know what high fructose corn syrup really is?

Believe it or not, there is a large degree of controversy in the health community as to whether or not high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) any different than consuming sugar, honey, or any of the other sweeteners humans have consumed for decades prior to the 1970s when it was first introduced on the market.

Let’s start off with defining what this evil thing is, HFCS, anyway. I’m sure you’ve heard of it, probably all bad things. But do you know what it really is (besides an evil liquid sweet substance that makes you fat especially your liver, inflames everything in your body, and will likely give you a heart attack in the next 5 years)? Defined, it is derived from corn starch which has been broken down into corn syrup to which enzymes have been added to change some of the glucose to fructose, making the product

sweeter than regular corn syrup. Regular corn syrup is 100% glucose whereas HFCS now has a large portion or fructose. According to the FDA, HFCS 42 (as in 42% fructose) is mainly used in processed foods, cereals, baked goods, and some beverages. HFCS 55 (as in 55% fructose) is used primarily in soft drinks. Make sense?

Why is it used? Because it’s cheap. It comes from an abundance and renewable source in the agricultural industry – corn. It’s also stable in acidic environments and beverages, making it very easy to use in products. Being that it’s liquid, it’s also easy to pump from delivery vehicles to mixing and storage tanks.

So why the controversy? It’s cheap, it’s easy, seems to be near identical to table sugar, which is 50% glucose and 50% fructose – the substance all other sweeteners are compared to. So why all the media hype? One of the biggest spotlights it has been deemed a demon for is the obesity epidemic. I’ve done as thorough research review and as Harry Truman said, “If you can’t convince them, conf

use them.”And that’s largely where I’m at -sort of.

Here’s why. The vast majority of the studies I read concluded that HFCS is no more to harmful to our health than consuming regular table sugar is. That doesn’t mean it’s good for you, it just means it’s not worse for you than eating added sugars in general. That makes a lot of sense to me because I already know that eating added sugar does more harm that good. What didn’t make sense to me was that some of these articles, like this one from the NIH, while compelling, were funded by Pepsi Co International, Coca Cola, ConAgra Foods, Kraft Foods, Corn Refiners Association, and Weight Watchers. The conclusion was “based on high quality evidence from randomized controlled tria

ls (RCT), systematic reviews and meta-analyses of cohort studies that singling out added sugars as unique culprits for metabolically based diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease appears inconsistent with modern, high quality evidence and is very unlikely to yield health benefits.” In case you forgot, Weight Watchers has a large product line if one and two point cakes, muffins, and other yummy sweet treats to keep you on track with your point count.

And this review, who’s final statement was “it does not appear to be practical to base dietary guidance on selecting or avoiding these specific types of sweeteners,” was funded by the United States Department of Agriculture. It’s just hard for me to see beyond the possibility of hidden agendas w

hen companies who have a lot to lose are dumping their money into statements telling the public th

at what they are doing is perfectly safe.

I did find some unbiased research out there though. As of 2004, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reported that there indeed is evidence that it may have a special connection to the rising obesity rates, particularly because of the overconsumption of sweetened sodas. The conclusion that started this whole controversy was that “the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and gout is also increased with the consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks.”

But why would this be? For starters, with the cheap source of sweeteners, the average soda size grew from sixteen ounce bottles to twenty. Even more so, this sugary substance is addicting. W

hen we get a taste of it, we want more. Sweetness is an acquired taste. Ever met a one year old who’s never had candy or cookies? I have and they could care less about it. I met a holistic nutrition doctor once that has two children between the ages of five and ten who have never had sugar of any kind before….and they didn’t want it. In contrast, I’ve met a two year old who’s tasted candy and they will go through great lengths to get it (like pulling up chairs, climbing furniture, hiding behind furniture with said candy, screaming, crying…not that this was my kid or anything.)

In a more recent study in 2013, they concluded similar results (along with increased risk of fatty liver disease) with more astounding statistics – between 1950 and 2000 the soda consumption increased from 10 gallons per year to over 50 gallons per year and from 120 pounds of sugar in 1994 to over 160 pounds of sugar in the 21 st century.

Additionally, fructose can be a nightmare if you suffer from irritable bowel syndrome. For about one third of sufferers, fructose malabsorption or intolerance may exacerbate symptoms of bloating, gas, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Fructose is naturally found in honey and fruits. But we eat it on the daily in sugary drinks and processed foods – trying to eliminate it can be a challenge. Same goes for those with a corn allergy. It’s becomes a second job to avoid HFCS since it’s now in not only sodas but crackers, cookies, frozen dinners, granola bars, and yogurt.

Lastly, I’ve talked about the hunger regulating hormones, ghrelin and leptin before. There is evidence to suggest that HFCS inhibits insulin secretion thus, the leptin isn’t produced to promote satiety after a meal or a snack full of HFCS. As far as I have found, ghrelin (the hunger producing hormo

ne) isn’t increased, but who cares when you get no full signal while you’re chowing down on a box of doughnuts?

Bottom line: eat it, as with table sugar and all added sugars, in moderation. It is unclear if HFCS is the cause of the rising obesity epidemic and all of the related health issues we are experienc

ing in ourselves and our families, but it is crystal clear that there is a correlation.

What is moderation though? Well, I didn’t find much out there. I know less than 160 pounds per year, but that doesn’t tell me a whole lot. To give you an idea, one 12 ounce can of soda has 40 grams. So consider a plant-based diet with lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and eliminate sweetened beverages. Start there and limit the sweets to special occasions and holidays.

 

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN