My recovery from procrastination and perfectionism

Here we are again. Looking at the same weights I’ve owned for probably fifteen years. Back to the lowest numbers. Again. Another epiphany that I need to pick them up and use them to feel better, look better, have more energy, and everything in between.

Why do we do this to ourselves? I own everything from three pounds to ten pounds and then all of the resistance bands too. I work up to lifting and pulling the hardest strengths until something happens and I get out of the routine. For months. Years even.

This time it was a doctor’s appointment. I’ve had chronic pain issues since my first born was a year old. It stems from migraines, which I’ve had since my earliest memories, but the term “chronic” came into play seven years ago. Before then, I was pretty active – running half marathons, participating in power yoga several days a week, and pretty committed to cardiovascular exercise on a daily basis. We all know how it is though, life gets busy after kids, work, and compounding responsibilities and then there is no more time to fit in self care. Until you have no choice.

That’s where I’m at. I’m sure many of you are in the same boat. You need to do something, but you’re not sure where to start because the only time you remember feeling your best was when you actually had the time and energy to do the things you know you should be doing. Problem is, you have neither now. Life is different and you don’t know where to start.

If you are like me then you probably have a tendency to push yourself until you just can’t anymore. You have multiple responsibilities and if something is going to go, it’s probably exercising and eating healthy. Until you’re crashing and sitting in a doctor’s office or your bed wondering how you ended up that way. You’ve heard the airplane analogy, so you know you’re supposed to put your oxygen mask on first, but you haven’t. Until you’re forced to. Read on. This is for you.

Here are a few strategies I’ve learned along the way that I believe will help you (like they do for me, when I implement them):

  1. The days of perfection are over. Did you know procrastination is the most common form of perfectionism? We hold off until “just the right time” to get started until we are pushed with our backs against the wall. And then we use the excuse” if i had more time, I would of had better results.” Ironic, huh? Remember this, moving forward in imperfection is ALWAYS better than not moving forward at all.
  2. Decide the goals you are working towards and write them down. With pen and paper. It’s a psychological thing when we do this that scientifically makes it more likely we will follow through with our goals (even more so than typing them.) And include realistic deadlines to avoid procrastination. Be sure to break your larger goals down to smaller, more manageable ones.
  3. Plan ahead in a realistic manner. Go ahead and pick out the days you plan to exercise. What meals you’re going to have. Grocery shop for the week. And then realize it may all go down the tubes anyway. Refer to #1. You may have decided to wake up thirty minutes early every morning to get in some exercise, but there will be days that you oversleep the alarm clock anyway. So what? You can always settle for a fifteen minute walk on your lunch break at work instead. Something is better than nothing.
  4. Go tell someone. I know that being accountable is no fun. It means you’re being really real about it this time. Pick someone that will actually hold you accountable though. Not just someone that will be a cheerleader and pat you on the back when you had a bad day. We all need that, but even more so, we need someone that isn’t afraid to call us out when we aren’t doing what we said we’d do. Your word is your integrity.
  5. Avoid catastrophizing. This is perhaps the biggest tip that has helped me over the years. It means you are using your energy productively rather than by viewing things worse than they actually are. Believe me, I know when situations look dire that it’s tempting to set giant goals that you know would turn your life completely around for the better. Unfortunately that usually leads to failure or procrastination and ultimately, more defeat. If you want to lose 100 pounds, break it down into ten pound increments. If you want to be fit enough to run a half marathon, pick one scheduled six months or more from now and get to training, one mile at a time.

We are nearly eight weeks away from the holidays. What is it that you’ve been procrastinating on? Let me know in the comments!

P.S. If you are up to beginning this journey with me starting Monday, October 2, head over here for the details and how to join my support group where we will be having weekly live chats and goal setting sessions.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Foods that naturally boost your metabolism

First off, let’s start with a little background because most people who struggle with their weight are tempted to blame their metabolism for the difficulty they are experiencing. If you have a longstanding history of weight cycling, aka yo yo dieting, a slow metabolism may very well be your problem – for the purposes of this post, that is what the main focus will be. So what happens to your metabolism when you weight cycle, aka “yo yo” diet?

1. First, you lose a lot of fat mass (good thing) but a lot of muscle mass too (unavoidable with rapid weight loss, not a good thing)
2. If it was not a sustainable diet (often it’s not), then the weight piles back on at lightning speed, but this time it is all mostly replaced with fat mass.
3. Fat burns less calories than muscle = your metabolism tanks. Next time you try to diet, it doesn’t come off as easily or fast.
4. Over time, chronic dieters find themselves with a slower and slower metabolism because they keep losing muscle and replacing it with fat. It’s a viscous cycle that eventually makes it almost impossible for weight loss success to occur.

Fear not, if this all sounds too familiar and you think you are in this situation, I’ve done a little research for you and found some promising ways to boost your metabolism, naturally.

  • Tomato juice: in a 2015 study published by the NIH, menopausal women aged 40-60 who consumed 200 ml unsalted tomato juice twice daily experienced an increased in resting energy expenditure (REE) by an average of 400 calories
    Bottom line: drink 200 milliliters twice a day (about 6 ounces twice a day). Hey, it’s not gonna hurt anything.
  • Cinnamon: in a 2012 study published by the International Journal of Preventative Medicine, one group of individuals took cinnamon supplements every day, while the other group took a placebo. After 8 weeks, the cinnamon group lost more weight and body fat than the group taking the placebo.
    Bottom line: add cinnamon to your food or try the pure essential oil for a more concentrated version. Contact me if you are interested in learning more about brands I trust and recommend. remember, supplements are not regulated and therefore, may not be free of contaminants.
  • Coffee: most studies with caffeine in doses of about 100mg per day (6 ounces of coffee) showed an increased calorie burn between 75 and 110 calories for the entire day. There are other sources of caffeine, but coffee is a calorie free source that actually contains some antioxidants.
    Bottom line: have some caffeine before exercise to maximize the calorie burring effects if you are going to try this one. Hey, I love coffee, why  not?
  • Grapefruit: A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food in 2006 showed that obese patients who consumed 8 oz of grapefruit juice or 1/2 of a grapefruit before each meal lost about 3.5 lbs after 12 weeks, without making any other changes to their diets. Participants in the study who consumed a grapefruit capsule before meals also lost weight — but just 2.2 pounds over the 12 weeks. The placebo group did not lose weight.
    Bottom line: drink 8 ounces grapefruit juice, eat 1/2 grapefruit daily, or take a grapefruit capsule with meals (I recommend with 2-3 drops pure essential oil in each one, contact me for recommended brands)
  • Lean Protein: Eggs, chicken, fish, low-fat yogurt, low-fat cheese, turkey
    The “thermic effect of food” (TEF) is the energy we use to digest food into small, absorbable components. Protein burns more calories to digest than carbs & fats. It also takes longer to digest, keeping you fuller longer.
    Bottom line: include 30 grams protein at meals, 8-10 grams of protein at snacks, and eat every 3-5 hours
  • Ginger: promotes digestion and stimulates metabolism, which leads to increased calorie burning. In animal studies, it increased metabolisms by 20%. In human studies, most herbal supplements taken internally increase metabolic rates by 2 to 5% tops. Every little bit helps! In a small, but very interesting pilot study, it was shown to enhance the thermic effect of food and increase the feeling of fullness after a meal. Bottom line: add it to your foods (we aren’t animals); you could also try the pure essential oil for a more concentrated source. If youve never cooked with essential oils, visit my previous post here.

What about appetite suppressants?

There are a few medical options that can help. I’ve talked them in the past along with habits that can help. In the spirit of natural options, here are some effective options I found in  my research:

  • Peppermint Oil: in its food grade, it is used often in the candy and dental industries (seems like an oxymoron, huh?). There is a reason for those after dinner mints! Because of the strong smell, it has an appetite suppressing effect in its purity. Try brushing your teeth after dinner, chewing mint gum while cooking, or diffusing peppermint essential oil to take advantage of this benefit.
  • Water: dehydration often leads to excessive hunger and even sugar cravings, especially chronic dehydration. Aim to consume half of your body weight in ounces of water daily. Add citrus for flavor and extra cleansing benefits. My personal favorite is pure lemon essential oil. Better yet, add fresh squeezed grapefruit juice or grapefruit essential oil.
  • Capsaicin: as in chili peppers. Ever notice you eat less when you have an extra spicy dish? This is why. Unless you are a glutton for punishment, of course.

Let me know what you try and feel free to reach out to me if you are interested in learning more about incorporating essential oils into your weight management routine.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Is weight loss surgery the easy way out?

No, no it isn’t. If you opted for weight loss surgery, don’t ever let anyone tell you that you took the easy way out. If you know someone who opted for it, realize that the decision was most likely made after hours and hours of intense thought and discussion amongst family members and key medical providers. It involves drastic lifestyle changes with a serious commitment to habit alterations. But it’s lifesaving and as I said in my recent post, it is often the best decision that person has ever made for their health.

My goal for this post is to explain the options in the simplest way possible and drive home the fact that, although weight loss surgery may be the most successful end point for weight loss known to date, it certainly is not the easy way out. It’s only a tool, but a damn good one at that.

So here we go, let’s start with the laparoscopic banding procedure. Nothing is changed from your inside anatomy. So you still have your full stomach and intestines intact. The band is purely a restrictive procedure and is just what it sounds like, a band (think of it like a bracelet even) that is placed around the top portion of the stomach. At first, it’s just a fancy expensive bracelet. Shortly after surgery, it can be filled with a salt solution, called saline, to tighten its grip around the stomach, by injecting the fluid through a port that runs from the band to just under your skin. Think of it as blowing up a doughnut ring….that hole in the middle is gonna get tighter when it’s blown up. Problem is, this procedure doesn’t work. I know, that’s a bold statement for me to say, but in the ten years I’ve worked with bariatric surgery candidates, I only saw maybe three patients (out of hundreds) lose the expected 20-25% of their initial starting weight and maintain it off for more than one year. And guess what? All of them eventually had to have their bands removed due to complications and/or weight regain. Luckily, their bands were converted to the sleeve gastrectomy and they were able to continue their lives with a more permanent option.

People see the band as the “noninvasive, less risky” choice. However, that’s just not true. When you have a foreign object placed in your body, it doesn’t like it. The band can slip out of place, corrode, grow into the stomach, get infected, flip over and out of place, the port tubing can get a hole in it and leak, and the possibilities go on and on. Most often, one of two things would happen. I either saw people throw up over and over because food just wouldn’t go down where the band was and eventually their esophagus above the band placement would dilate, or get bigger, and they would end up with essentially two stomachs to fill. Think of it like an hour glass, one on top and one on the bottom….endless hunger. Or I saw them give up and live on liquid, soft foods that slid through the band into the stomach easier…..so milkshakes, pudding, ice cream, jello, mashed potatoes, and even fried foods. It’s not uncommon for someone to even gain weight after this procedure, as you could imagine. Some facilities have smartened up and don’t offer the band anymore. In my opinion, if a surgeon recommends the band to you, run the other way.

The sleeve gastrectomy has gotten lots of attention over the past five years or so for those who have a lot of weight to lose but may or may not have any major health problems. It is a purely restrictive procedure as the surgeon removes around 75-80% of the stomach in a vertical fashion, leaving a banana shape left. Don’t be mistaken, though, your stomach ends up smaller than a banana. Think “man’s index finger” size. It is very restrictive, but what I think helps people out the most is that the part of the stomach that gets removed is also the part that produces the hunger hormone, ghrelin.

So, yea, you may fill up on the same amount of food your two year old niece just ate, but you weren’t really hungry to begin with. And if you have read or listened to any of my content before, you may have heard me talk about how ghrelin increases in production in response to massive weight loss. It can’t with the sleeve gastrectomy. That’s a big plus. I do caution people against choosing this procedure if they have problems with stress or emotional eating or what I call “grazing.” If you don’t eat because of excessive hunger and you have a habit of nitpicking all day long out of boredom or stress, this procedure doesn’t do anything to stop that….you can still eat a small amount of food every couple of hours or so. You can’t, however, sit down to a large meal and finish it in your normal ten minutes. It’s going to take at least twenty minutes to finish off a 1/3 cup of ground turkey. Talk about eating to live! Expected weight loss is anywhere from 25 to 35% of your starting weight. This is life changing for the vast majority of those that are are successful at it.

The last procedure I’m going to talk about here is the roux en y gastric bypass. This one has gotten a bad rep for years which is why I believe there are so many new procedures constantly up and coming, like the stomach stapling at one time, then the lap band, now the sleeve, and the up and coming “balloon” (that’s for another post). But this one has stood the test of time for the last forty years now and remains the gold standard of weight loss surgery. Is it drastic? Yes. Does it involve a huge lifestyle change? Oh yes. Does it work? Yes. I’ve seen lives absolutely change for the better and people leave the hospital off their diabetes medications after having this surgery. There was no waiting period for weight loss, it was immediate. When we talk about this surgery, we are talking about a metabolic operation that changes the body’s hormones with some major rerouting of your digestive system. So, like the sleeve gastrectomy, hunger is no longer an issue. Nothing is actually removed, like in the sleeve, but the part of the stomach that produces the hunger hormone, ghrelin, no longer comes into contact with food. The major difference is that a large portion of the small intestines is rerouted to create a “Y” shape with the new, smaller, egg-shaped stomach and connected lower down the digestive tract which results in calorie malabsorption. Not only are you not hungry and restricted in how much you can eat in one sitting, but you also don’t absorb all the calories you eat at one time. Lastly, high sugar and high fat foods are a no go. You run a high risk of getting sick with the shakes, diarrhea, and breaking out in sweats if you eat even just one small bite of the wrong thing. Interestingly enough, lots of people who have had this surgery experience a change in their taste preferences anyway.

Since expected weight loss is closer to 35% starting weight, I recommend this procedure for the stress eater, person with a slow metabolism, chronic yo yo dieter, and most importantly, anyone with a serious health condition who requires massive weight loss to improve. This would include cardiovascular disease, obstructive sleep apnea, or diabetes.

This is your life, and if someone told you there was a cure for a known disease that you have, would you take it? In 2013, the American Medical Association recognized obesity as a chronic disease. At that point, health insurance companies began expanding their coverage for weight loss surgeries. A chronic disease is something that never really goes away. If you have been struggling with your weight, you know what I’m talking about. You succeed at a weight loss attempt temporarily, but the weight always finds its way back, somehow. I know that this is not for everybody and you may note even qualify.

If it is something you are considering or if you are in a place where you don’t quite qualify, but you’d like some help with your weight, feel free to reach out to me at the below links.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Why it’s not risky to have weight loss surgery

Although I have never personally been overweight, I am an advocate for those who are. It’s not because I watched a family member struggle or have some heart wrenching personal story to share with you. Circumstances ten years ago just lead me to a position working with people who do struggle with weight.

Through that time, I have gotten to know hundreds, if not thousands, of individuals and their personal stories, and why there is so much more to weight loss than “eat less, exercise more.” I’ve helped a lot of people make the scary decision to pursue weight loss surgery, get their habits (and their mind) right on the way there, and I’ve been there that amazing day when they became a literal new person. So much so, I couldn’t even recognize them standing right next to me as I called them into my office for that two month post surgery check up.

I’ve cried with clients, done happy dances with them when the scale hit a certain number, and held the trash can when they needed to vomit because they ate something they shouldn’t have (yea, sucks to do that in your dietitian’s office.) I’ve been the first person to weigh someone after years and years of avoiding the scale. I’ve been the last person to see someone drink a soda before they chucked it in the trash can for good (carbonation isn’t allowed after weight loss surgery if you were wondering.) I’ve also been the first person to find out they’re going for it, for realz. It’s scary, it’s exciting, it’s terrifying, and it’s truly life changing.

Here’s the deal though, I don’t want to hear that “bariatric surgery is high risk” from people who know nothing about it other than that their brother’s coworker’s aunt’s mother in law had that “stomach stapling” procedure back in the 80s and died. Don’t ever take the excitement away from someone by telling them it’s too risky. 

I do get it. I’ve worked with two or three people out of hundreds that had the surgery and it went terribly wrong. They can’t eat food anymore because they had a rare complication. They get to live on a feeding tube for the rest of their life. I’ve gotten to know a couple of individuals who died months later because their health problems before surgery were against them and weight loss surgery didn’t fix it. It sucked. But they were exceptions, more on this later.

But I’ve also seen people get out of wheelchairs, off their diabetes medications, go on vacations again, and live life out of the house again because of this surgery. And that “stomach stapling” or “risky gastro procedure” everyone is so scared of, was actually life saving to someone that used to spend their entire life dieting without success, counting pills, administering injections, and going to doctor visits because their body became a prison.

If you think it’s about eating less and exercising more, think again. Obesity is not a lifestyle choice. If it was, there would be zero obese people in this world trying to lose weight. Everyone would wake up, cherry pick their dream weight and get to it. But if you’re reading this, you probably know that’s not true.

Here are 5 well meaning reasons why I’ve heard weight loss surgery is an unsafe choice and why they are false. If it’s something you’ve been considering but have been convinced it’s a “last ditch effort,” I want to give you some peace of mind to make a rationale choice. I’m not here to tell you to go do it, but I don’t want you to not go do it out of fear, either.

  1. You could die. Obesity itself is the number 2 cause of preventable death (aside from smoking) in the United States today. In this analysis of 13,871 morbidly obese patients from a national registry between January 1996 and January 2006, the risk of death within 60 days following any weight loss procedure was 0.25%, making it a rare event. A main reason for this is because modern day procedures are typically done laparoscopically, meaning only 5 small incisions about one inch in length each are made to perform the procedure rather than a long vertical incision as used to be made. Medicine is always evolving!
  2. It’s a cop out. And you could die. Okay, this is kind of a continuation of the first, but I felt needed more clarification. Bariatric surgery is emerging as a powerful weapon against severe obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Numerous studies confirm that weight loss surgery, particularly Roux en y gastric bypass surgery is more effective at bringing those with T2DM into disease remission than those who were undergoing conventional medical therapy. Some studies that back this up include this one, this one, this one, and this one. But there are several more available in case you need more proof. As a reminder, complications of long term, uncontrolled diabetes include: kidney failure, often requiring dialysis, neuropathy leading to toe and/or foot amputations, and heart disease. Not one of these are known complications of weight loss surgery.
  3. You’re going to throw up a lot. Well, yes, if you don’t follow strict dietary guidelines. I get it, this is not a lifestyle for everyone. It requires consuming adequate amounts of nutrition, 5-6 times/day, when you’re barely hungry. It also means you will be preplanning your meals every day, for the rest of your life, including the small details like quantities, calories, and protein grams. You will also need to be picky about what restaurants you choose when and if you decide to eat out in restaurants. Be prepared to eat slower. A lot slower. And chew well. Choose your food wisely. No room for fillers here when your stomach is the size of an egg. So no air swallowing habits either, like chewing gum or soda. Eat the wrong food item and you may be sorry for hours or days following.
  4. You’ll have no energy. Actually, if you’re frame has been carrying an extra 50-100 pounds it’s not supposed to be carrying and all of the sudden, in a very short person of time (say, 4-6 months?), you lose it 50 plus pounds, just like that? Wouldn’t ya think the opposite would be true? Think of it more like this: you’ve been carrying a 75 pounds back pack for a few years and I just took it off. How would that feel? This doesn’t really matter what your starting weight is, either. 75 pounds is 75 pounds.  You will also be forced to eat better with surgery, that’s part of what the surgery is for. Run through the drive through with some friends and a cheeseburger real quick and you’ll be running to puke. It’s just what happens when you’re digestive system is rearranged and shortened. Better diet = more energy.
  5. You’ll just gain it all back, so why bother going through that? Not true. Statically, 20% or 1 in 5 individuals who have weight loss surgery will regain all of the weight lost following surgery. But that also means 80% or 4 in 5 will maintain that loss. Those who do not have surgery? If your body mass index is above 30, the sad and terrible truth is, statistically <1% of individuals will maintain any weight off. I know….

In case you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m a pretty big proponent of weight loss surgery. This may surprise you, but like I said, I’ve worked with lots of people and I know their struggle. I’m also a big proponent of taking control of your own life, whatever that may mean for you…and I’m here to help you on that journey. I’ve got a ton of posts for the non-surgery folk too, so look around!

There are various types of surgeries, but the two most effective and common choices available today are the laparoscopic roux-en-y gastric bypass and the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. If you want to know more about them, I encourage you to talk with your doctor. This post would go on forever if I described them here, but certainly feel free to reach out to me for resources if you want to know what they are.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

5 Excuses why we don’t exercise (and how to bust through them)

We all have that one friend who loves to exercise. They swear by it and if they miss a day, everyone knows about it because they claim to feel terrible. You wanna be like them. Well maybe not just like them, but you want to at least want to exercise.But as of this post, you can’t remember the last time you actually did exercise. I’m gonna help you out and just lay all of the most common excuses for why exercise is so easy to justify not doing and then tell you why they are totally false. Sound good? If you read on, you may no longer use these excuses. Fair warning.

Excuse #1: I don’t have enough time. Well join the club. I’m gonna give you a little eye-opener though – think of the last really good book you read. Like, Hunger Games/Fifty Shades Trilogy good (whatever you thing is). How long did it take you to read all 3 books? Be honest. How did you make the time? Stay up all night? Make the kids cook their own dinner? Skip a tv show or two? Here’s the deal- we make time for what we want. It comes down to priorities. I’m not telling you to stop scrolling on Facebook (although we all could probably benefit from less time spent there), but I am telling you to evaluate how you spend your time if this is the excuse you hold near and dear.

Tips to bust through it: Wear a pedometer. I highly recommend the Omron HJ325. It doesn’t cost much and is one of the more accurate step counters I have used it for years. Could be a FitBit if you want to get more fancy and track your heart rate, sleep quality, and time. Exercise is great, but it’s more about being physically active throughout the day. I talk about step goals here. Break it up if you are really that strapped for time. Say, two to three fifteen walk breaks daily instead of one 45 minute walk around the neighborhood. Most of us can find an extra ten or fifteen minutes here and there throughout our day where we are wasting time and could be walking. Step counters make you more aware of how you can fit in “accidental” activity as well (i.e. stairs, parking farther away, walking allll the way over to your colleague’s cubicle instead of sending an email, etc). If you need to sneak in resistance training, keep a set of hand weights by your couch to do while watching television, bring resistance bands to work and learn exercises that are easy to do between phone calls. Multitask!

Excuse #2: I’m exhausted. I get it. I have two kids, church commitments, a part-time job, and I own a business. My day usually starts at 5:30 a.m. and ends around 10:30 p.m. I’m sure you have lots of your own stuff that wears you out. Thing is, being exhausted is often a symptom of physical inactivity. Ouch. Energetic people are in motion.

Tips to bust through it: If you need to get up and go first thing when you wake up, before you have time to talk yourself out of it, then put your shoes by the door and clothes by the bathroom sink where you go to brush your teeth. Make it a habit. When I used to work full time, I would bring my clothes with me to work and go for a long walk or run in the neighborhood behind our building before I got in the car to go home. I knew myself and once I got in the door, not only would the day catch up, but the evening responsibilities would swallow me up too. Other days I would take two or three short walk breaks to total 20-30 minutes a day just to stay awake! Working at a desk job with no windows will zap your energy alone.

Excuse #3: I hurt too much. This is possibly one of the more difficult challenges to bust through. Little known fact: I’m a chronic pain sufferer myself. So again, I get it. Here’s what I know about chronic pain – the more you sit around and think about it, the worse it gets. The less you move, the worse it gets. If you have pain, it is MORE of a reason to move, NOT less. If you’re complaining because of common post exercise muscle soreness, well that’s supposed to happen and it’s a good thing. If you work muscles that aren’t used to moving, they’re naturally gonna revolt on you. Over time, this won’t happen so much as you get stronger. To some degree, you always want to feel some soreness as a sign that you are challenging yourself a bit, but not to a point that it’s painful.

Tips to bust through it: Modify. Not everyone was meant to run cross country or train for triathlons. That’s okay. In fact, one of the best exercises you can do is walk. If you are going for general health, thirty minutes most days is the goal. If you are aiming to lose and maintain weight loss, you’ll need to go for 45-60 minutes most days. If you have an injury that keeps you from walking that much, try bicycling, swimming, or even seeing a physical therapist if you need to. Point is, you can always find something that will work for you if you seek and ask for help. In the long run, you may even experience less pain. Win-win!

Excuse #4: I really don’t like to exercise. This is my favorite! Saying this is like saying “I don’t like food, so I won’t eat.” There are just way too many choices to say that kind of statement. What you are really saying is “I don’t have any reason not to exercise, I just don’t want to.” Sorry, this just isn’t an excuse.

Tips to bust through it: Be willing to try new things. Walking sound boring? Get a partner to pass the time. Try group classes. Change it up and alternate activities. If you like sports, remember that counts as activity, so find a local team that meets for fun. Is the gym intimidating? Go during off hours when not many people are there. You could always skip the gym altogether and stay home and do videos on YouTube, purchase exercise DVDs, or walk outdoors. There are just too many options to try to say you don’t like any of it.

Excuse #5: It’s too hot, too cold, raining, snowing outside. It’s always one of these things outside. Where I live, we get about two weeks of Fall weather (so, when it’s none of those things), another two weeks of semi-cold, and the other 48 weeks are hot and/or raining. So this excuse can be made a lot.

Tips to bust through it: Go early before the elements kick in. Go later in the evening after the sun has gone down. When it’s colder, go mid-day when the sun is at peak. If it’s raining or during the summer when temperatures reach heat-stroke warning highs, be flexible and go indoors. I’ve given you lots of options already of what to do inside. Some gyms offer month to month memberships. If you live by a mall, most of them open early enough before the shops so that you can go walking inside. Don’t worry about looking silly, everyone else is in there doing the same thing!

This just about covers the main excuses for why people don’t exercise. I’ve used them all. You’ve probably used some, too. In addition to the tips I’ve given you to bust through them, I’ve also been able to lessen my pain and increase my energy by using the right vitamins and nutritional supplements. So many of us walk around with vague symptoms like fatigue, achy joints, and daily headaches and don’t realized it can be linked to a simple nutrient deficiency. Our food supply and many of the vitamins on the market today are stripped of the vital nutrients our bodies need to feel our best. If you’d like to know more about the brand I use and trust, feel free to contact me.

So tell me, are you ready to bust through these excuses? If you are, you may want some accountability. I’m beginning a 30 day Fitness Challenge on Monday, July 17, to take us through the rest of summer. If you want in, click here to join and for directions to get in.

P.S. If you’ve been looking for support, you’ve come to the right place, request to join my online support group for all things nutrition and weight loss support.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

This is why slower is better (even though it feels sucky)

When we make positive changes in our lives to reach a goal, it’s human nature to want results overnight or, even better, YESTERDAY. You know what I’m talking about if you’ve been on a healthy eating kick. I mean, who wants to plan their meals diligently, grocery shop and cook those meals, eat less than normal, feel hungry, drink a bunch of water, ditch the sugar and fried food, say no to the tv snacks, and get rid of the chocolate stash just for a couple of measly pounds after a entire week of faithfulness to this plan? Not many.

In life, we want a big payoff, or return on investment, when we make a decision to change. Want to make $10K a month? Who doesn’t? It takes time. Want to lose 80 pounds? It takes time. And here’s the deal – most people will get discouraged when they don’t see results fast. In fact, some may argue that diets offering quick results early on equal higher success rates because they spark high motivation. But what they don’t mention is the long term maintenance of said diets. And to me, that’s a failure. Anyone can lose weight. If you’re reading this, you’ve probably done it a dozen times yourself. That isn’t your problem. Your problem is maintaining that weight loss. So my challenge for you is to RESIST the urge to crash diet because crash dieting is no different than what you’ve done before.

In fact, losing weight quickly is a red flag that you will regain that weight quickly.

Why? Because physiologically, the body doesn’t adapt well. We are designed to be protected from starvation. Losing weight in general causes a decrease in the production of the hormone leptin, which signals the brain to say “hey you’re full, you can stop eating now.” It also causes an increase in the hormone ghrelin which tells the brain, “hey you need calories, eat!,” and that means you’re gonna be hungry. Losing weight also means a slower metabolism, because smaller people naturally burn less calories. If there is less of you, you are going to need less calories the smaller you. Make sense?

This creates a problem for the chronic dieter. You have a slower metabolism, but you’re hungrier than ever. Tack on an unrealistic diet you followed to get the weight loss you achieved (say, a low carb diet, an 800 calorie diet made up of all protein shakes, or a cabbage soup diet, you get the point) and well, you don’t stand a chance. Stay with me, there’s still hope.

If you are losing weight slower, say one half to two pounds per week, it can actually be a sign that you are likely to keep that weight off. Why? Because you are probably doing something that you can continue doing long term (i.e. you aren’t on the latest and greatest fad diet of the season). Think about it this way – if you are looking back at the last four weeks and you’ve lost two pounds, I completely understand that it may be really frustrating and you probably feel like you’re getting nowhere. But in one year that equals twenty-six pounds lost. Twenty-six pounds you will keep off for good. Isn’t that better than twenty-six pounds in say, two months that will ultimately result in thirty pounds regained over a year’s time? I know you know what I’m talking about here because you’ve probably experienced something similar.

What is an optimal rate to lose weight?

-If you weigh <250 pounds = 5-10% over six months (so a 200 pound person might lose 20 pounds by the 6 month mark)

-If you weigh >250 pounds = 10-20% over six months (so a 300 pound person might lose 60 pounds by the 6 month mark)

Bottom line, keep at it. Even if your wins don’t seem like much, they are actually a really big deal. Losing weight fast usually means it won’t stay off. I’ve seen it more times than I can count. On the flip side, when people lose weight at a slower pace consistently, I’ve almost never seen them regain it. So let that be an encouragement to you today to stay the course!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Keto diet- is it everything and more?

Several weeks ago, I began a diet review series and I did a brief synopsis of the Keto Diet. I admit it wasn’t very thorough and because I keep seeing it pop up and another friend starting it, another friend losing weight with it, and another person swearing by it for their increased energy, I’m gonna do a more thorough review here. I especially see my friends in the holistic communities doing it- and it’s spreading faster than the Whole 30 diet once was.

Is this the newest fad that will be replaced by something better in a couple of years? Or is it here to stay and in several years we are going to see evidenced based research popping up at how it’s the best diet that we never knew existed and if we just figured out how healthy fat was for us earlier, maybe we wouldn’t be seeing the rise of heart disease, obesity, cancer, and other related diseases that we do today?

Well, let’s start with what it even is. Roughly 70-75% fats (you read right), 5-10% carbohydrate, and 20-25% protein. As you can see this is not your normal low carb diet that typically replaces the missing carbs with protein. It’s all about the fat. Why? Because the purpose of this diet is to put your body into ketosis, aka a fat burning machine. Just to give you a little science lesson here, our bodies preferred source of fuel is glucose (what carbs are converted to after we eat them). Now if you are eating a diet high in carbs, that is what you will burn first for energy. And everything requires energy in our bodies to function properly, including our brains. When the body runs out of glucose (will happen if you aren’t eating very many carbs), the liver is great at producing a back up, called ketones. Ketones come from broken down fat. Make sense?

So why do people do this? I dunno about you, but while a high fat diet sounds pretty fun to me, a diet made of mostly fat doesn’t. But there are lots of anecdotal reports of promising results when one follows this kind of diet. I’ll start with two that have evidenced-based research backing the claims up (because you know me, that’s what I’m about.)

Note: it was very difficult for me to find any studies published prior to 2017 (soooo….6 months ago) that called a ketogenic diet low carb high fat. Be aware of that because any other “ketogenic” diet before that in the research was defined as “low carb, high protein.” There is a huge difference and that’s not what we are talking about here. I worked with patients and personally participated in 2 published studies on very low calorie high protein, low carb diets for 7 years.

Weight loss: this article  published in 2013 reviewed 12 different studies and found in 1415 subjects, the average weight loss after 6 months on a high fat, low carb diet was 2 pounds vs. 1.6 pounds for those following a low fat diet. After a 6 month follow up it was difficult to assess because compliance was not so great and they consumed more carbs than allowed. Another study published in 2009 was done for a full year on 106 obese individuals and compared weight loss of those on a keto diet vs a low fat, high carb diet. They found that their average weight loss was the same between groups, both losing an average of 30 pounds. Pretty good, but neither diet was superior to the other. It just showed that following a reduced calorie diet yields weight loss.

I will add here that I’ve always said, I’ve failed at what I do if I helped you lose weight but you regained it all back. I don’t think we know enough about this diet for the purposes of weight loss to know if it’s not just another yo yo plan. Sorry.

Lipid levels: In the same 2013 review, they analyzed 1258 subjects and found their triglycerides decreased significantly, and their HDL levels increased significantly. Both good things. I like that and the amount of subjects is enough to say it’s valid.

Other indicators of Metabolic Syndrome: The 2013 review noted there was no significant difference between treatment groups in changes in systolic blood pressure (11 trials), fasting blood glucose (eight trials), insulin (six trials), HbA1c – average blood glucose over three months (four trials) and C-reactive protein (four trials).

Athletic performance: In this 2017 review, they concluded that long-term low carb, high fat diets appear to be safe and may even improve several metabolic risk factors for chronic diseases in the general population. They may even provide a promising way to help control body weight and fat mass while maintaining lean body mass in athletes who are participating in sports like tae kwan do, wrestling, lightweight rowing, cycling, and running. Additionally, there is some emerging evidence that a keto diet could improve the performance in ultra-endurance sports as well as those sports with repeated high intensity activities. If you aren’t an athlete, this could still be a good thing if you’re hitting up the gym and wanna try out that new cycling class.

Focus and Mood: this has been one result that many believers love the most. And why I believe they stick with it. Who wouldn’t when you feel great, you’re losing weight, and you’re better able to focus? Who doesn’t need that? Here’s what the available research says: in a 2009 study, they found that after 8 weeks, those following both low carb, high fat diet and a low fat diet had significant improvements in their mood and cognitive functions. However, after a year, the low carb, high fat diet returned to their baseline mood and cognitive functions while those on the low-fat diet continued with their marked improvements. You read that right. The low-fat diet group continued with the better mood, NOT the keto group. This study here in 1998 reported similar results on women eating a high carb diet. I’m just the messenger, don’t hate me! Now, I’m not recommending you go eat a bunch of carbs to feel better. Okay?

Here’s the thing, the concept of following a keto diet for weight loss is fairly new in the research world. So you’re not gonna find a whole lot out there to prove it does a whole lot for health yet. You will find a bunch out there to show the benefits of what it does for those with epilepsy unresponsive to medication. It works.

And don’t expect overnight results. It takes time for the body to adapt to ketogenesis. Some sources I’ve read say two weeks, others say up to a couple of months – assuming you don’t go off plan, not even once. So no cheat days allowed. This diet is for the type A strict meal planning types. Those who are willing to keep a food record and count their carbs, fats, and proteins will do best.

I’m a weight loss expert. And here’s what I know about long term, sustainable weight loss. It’s hard. Like, really hard. If you’re looking for a study that proves ANY diet to work and be the ending answer to our obesity epidemic, well good luck. You will surely find that one person who followed a high carb diet and lost 167 pounds and now has kept it off for 13 years. There’s gonna be that person following the Atkins diet since it’s introduction to the dieting world and it’s changed their life forever. And then there’s the rest of the dieting world still looking for what works for them. I did not find anything that said following the ketogenic diet was harmful, not even long term. In fact, quite opposite. So if you wanna try it because you know someone or more than a few someones who are following it and now they look and feel great and you think it’s something that could help you, well let me know! I’m always looking to be inspired by someone’s dieting success story.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Dieting hacks: optical illusions & outta sight, outta mind

A lot of what we eat, sizes we choose, and amounts we serve ourselves are just an illusion. What do I mean by this?

Studies have shown that the most popular drink serving size is medium. However, “medium” is varies from restaurant to restaurant. For example, did you know Starbucks has a “short” size? It’s true. But they don’t advertise it because if they did, they know they would sell mostly “tall” drinks instead of “grande” which in most people’s eyes is considered their “medium” size. Why? Because they advertise tall-grande-venti. If they advertised short-tall-grande, we would all want tall. Interesting, huh?

To drive home this point, the first time I went to my local movie theater, I got a medium soda. However, what they considered medium was about 42 ounces!!! I took my kids yesterday and remembered this, so I ordered a “small” 32 ounces. Still gigantic, but imagine how many people are ordering the 42 ounce sodas simply because of the “medium” label? In a gas station, we call those “big gulps.”

I haven’t been to a bar in a long time….make that about 8 years (about the age of my oldest plus 9 months.) But in study found that experienced bartenders will pour about 20% more alcohol into a short glass versus the same size tall glass if not pre-measured while the average person will pour around 30% more. You think restaurants and bars have more tall glasses because of this? Of course they do! Or at least they are required to use their jiggers! Try this concept with your children for fun: show them 1/2 cup candy in a tall glass and a short glass (clear, see through) and give them a choice. They will choose the tall glass even though its the same amount. Why? Because the tall, slender glass looks like more candy.

How can you apply the optical illusion concept to your life?

  1. Use smaller bowls, plates, and cups so that it appears as if you are eating more than you are. As referenced in my last post, those portions will get lost in large plates and it’s been proven over and over, you will eat more if you eat on large serving dishes.
  2. Divide your snacks into smaller portions. The same researcher mentioned above, found that using visual indicators significantly reduces the amount that we eat. Check out this study where just adding a different color every seventh or fourteenth chip resulted in a 250 calorie difference!! It really can be that easy, folks! This is why single serving and 100 calorie packs are so effective! Get yourself some snack-sized plastic baggies and pre-portion out your snacks or before you sit down to watch television with a bag of chips, put a handful in a bowl first so you can see what you are eating. Do not rely on estimates when you are eating directly from the bag. Take that extra step if you are serious about losing weight.
  3. Make it inconvenient to overeat and put foods you should be limiting out of sight. Remove the candy dish off your desk and put it somewhere you can’t see it (like, in the trash. No really, in the pantry). Get the bag of chips off the top of your refrigerator and put it behind closed cabinet doors. Store your leftovers in an opaque container, in the back of your refrigerator (I don’t care if you forget about them, that’s the kind of the point!) And please, stop storing that ice cream in the freezer in case your grandkids come visit! It’s not good for them, either!
  4. Keep healthy foods convenient and visible. Store fresh fruits and vegetables in clear containers, in the front of your refrigerator, already cut up and ready to eat. Purchase cheese sticks already portioned out and make sure they aren’t buried under stuff in the deli drawer. Boil eggs in advance and peel them so that they are ready for a snack when you’re hungry, again stored in a clear container where you can see them. Replace the cookie jar on the counter with a bowl of fresh fruit. Put some single serve trail mix packages on top of your fridge in place of the chips. Need proof this stuff works? Here’s another study for you on how out of sight, out of mind reduces over-eating- office workers ate 5.6 more chocolates each day when dishes were visible but inconvenient, and 2.9 more chocolates when dishes were convenient but not visible. I’m suggesting you do both (make the food inconvenient and invisible), but according to this study, it’s the visibility that really counts.

Even if you pick one or two of these hacks to try, I think you will see some results in your life. Let me know in the comments what you try and how it’s helping you. Remember, it’s not willpower, it’s skill-power. I’m going to keep emphasizing that point because I want you to understand that you have the power within yourself to see the results that you desire.

P.S. Love to eat out but not sure how to fit it in with your health and wellness goals? Get these tips  sent to your inbox and master the dieting hacks even when you’re at restaurants!

P.P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Diet hacks for eating less and feeling full

Portion control. Do you cringe when you hear that? It’s more like portion distortion. The bigger is better mentality has surfaced everywhere – smart phones, television screens, computer monitors, boobs (yea, I said it), muscles, tires, cars, houses, and on and on.

Here’s the deal….most of us don’t even know what a portion of any food actually is. And when we do find out, it’s laughable. Why is that? Well, because we have become conditioned to super-sized servings. Now, a portion is an actual MEASURED amount. A serving is whatever you put on your plate. They are two very different things. So here’s a little education for you:

1 portion of carbohydrate = 1/2 cup (cooked, plain cereal like oatmeal/grits, potatoes, pasta corn, peas, beans) (80 calories) *rice is an exception at only 1/3 cup per serving

1 portion non starchy vegetable = 1 cup raw or 1/2 cup cooked, but really – unlimited (25 calories)

1 portion fresh fruit = 1 cup raw, 1 cup frozen or 1/2 cup canned (60 calories)

1 portion added fat = 1 teaspoon (oil, butter) (100 calories)

1 portion nut butter or avocado, sour cream = 1 tablespoon (90 calories)

1 portion nuts = 1/4 cup (170 calories)

1 portion dairy (milk, plain yogurt, cottage cheese) = 1 cup (110 calories)

1 portion of lean meat (chicken, fish, pork tenderloin, egg) = 3 ounces  or 1 egg (110 calories)

1 portion of high fat meat (beef, ribs, fatty fish) = 1 1/2 ounces (110 calories)

Note these are all estimates and foods vary A LOT depending on added sugars and fats or lack thereof. So reading labels is important too. But the key here is to understand that you are probably over-eating. For example, in a restaurant, the smallest sirloin is 9 ounces, that’s SIX TIMES as much as a “portion size”. I’m not saying you can only eat 1 1/2 ounces, but calories count and they add up fast if you aren’t paying attention. It’s really no wonder how people gain weight easily when they are eating out frequently.

But it’s not just restaurants to blame. It’s how we cook at home, too. For instance, when you make pasta – do you cook the entire box? Have you ever looked at the label? A pound of pasta is enough to feed sixteen people if you are sticking to the 1/2 cup serving. If you go with the box’s suggested serving of two ounces or 1 cup each, then you are cooking for eight people. I’m guessing you aren’t feeding that many people for dinner on a regular basis though. So how do you deal without feeling hungry all the time?

Here are some tried and true tricks:

  1. Realize this is not willpower. I repeat – NOT willpower. It’s skill-power. So first of all, STOP cooking for an army and start cooking for the number of people having the actual dinner. I once counseled a couple that did this and each lost forty pounds without changing what they were eating. If you really don’t want to do this, then plan for leftovers, but make two pans/pots/casseroles and immediately put one in the freezer or whatever you need to do BEFORE you start eating. Remove that temptation.
  2. Use smaller plates – as in six to eight inch plates. You know those salad plates you have that came with your ten inch dinner plates. Yeah, those ones. In a study done by food scientist and researcher, Brian Wansink, he explored how an optical illusion leads us to make inaccurate estimates of serving size, depending on what size plate they are presented on. The more “white space” around the circle, the smaller it appears and thus, we feel the need to fill the plate to the edges. Same goes with bowls, in another study he conducted at a health and fitness camp, campers who were given larger bowls served and consumed 16% more cereal than those given smaller bowls. Despite the fact that those campers were eating more, they estimated eating 7% less than the group eating from the smaller bowls. Interesting, huh?
  3. Allow a good twenty minutes to finish your first plate before getting seconds. It takes your brain that long to register that you have eaten. Now I do understand that it can be quite annoying to eat slow if you are a naturally fast eater. So I suggest if you zip through your meal in five to ten minutes, then wait for the next ten minutes to pass before you decide if you truly need a second helping. And if you do, go for veggies first since they are the lowest in calories.
  4. Use the plate method and shift the calorie make up on your plate. This goes with the concept of a volumetrics type diet. Notice how vegetables only have twenty-five calories per portion? But the starchy carbohydrates have eighty? And that’s assuming you didn’t load them up with gravy, butter, or other fats. Same with meats, 110 calories per one to two ounces? Fill up half of your plate with non-starchy vegetables (so NOT corn/peas/potatoes), a third with high fiber carbohydrates, and the rest with a meat, preferably a lean meat. If it’s breakfast time, fill that half with fruits. Make sense? You are eating more low calorie foods and less high calorie foods, but not sacrificing volume. Another way of looking at is like this: one cup of salad dressing is around 1440 calories, one cup of nuts is 680 calories, one cup of fat free milk is 90 calories and one cup of raw vegetables is 25 calories. In other words, a large plate of pasta is going to be a ton more calories than a plate of salad. Here’s the issue with most of us: usually our plates are half meat (often high fat), half starch, and vegetables as an afterthought or something starchy like corn (at least here in the south!) Personally, I prefer the plate method over measuring my food. I got kids and if I don’t inhale my food, I don’t eat before there’s an explosion of a hot mess in my house. Like many of you I’m sure, I don’t get the luxury of measuring, weighing, and taking my time to eat dinner – so I’m thankful for these hacks that still make it possible to eat well.

Lastly, remember that the above will not work if you arrive to the dinner table starving. The day starts with a healthy breakfast, planned out high protein snacks and a healthy lunch. If you didn’t eat high protein, healthy foods every three to five hours earlier in the day, you can forget about the rest because you will want to eat the refrigerator door by the time you sit down for dinner and a six inch plate will just piss you off. For tips on preplanning meals – head over to this previous post on how to do that.

P.S. Love to eat out but not sure how to fit it in with your health and wellness goals? Get these tips  sent to your inbox and hopefully they will help you out.

P.P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Could you go 30 days without sugar?

We just finished a 30 day no sugar challenge in my online community. The results were pretty amazing. Weight loss plateaus were broken, shopping habits were changed, and more importantly, carbohydrates were no longer demonized.

What do I mean by this?

In the beginning, there was some confusion about what was okay and what was not. The challenge was meant to be a simple one – no added sugars of any kind (including honey, table sugar – white, brown, etc, agave, maple syrup) and no refined or processed carbohydrates. The first one was pretty easy to grasp. The second category was more difficult because, in the dieting world, we become conditioned to categorizing foods into two groups: carbohydrates (bad) and everything else (good).

It was a fun learning process. This was the list of disallowed foods in addition to added sugars: 
-chips/french fries (anything that’s made from a potato but isn’t an actual potato)
-pretzels
-cookies/brownies
-sweetened coffee creamer
-candy
-crackers
-cake/snack cakes/snack bars
-white pasta (whole grain is fine, couscous which is a tiny form of pasta is also good, quinoa also good)
-white breads and buns (whole grains are fine)
-white bagels and english muffins
-white waffles (there are very few whole grain waffle varieties available)

-white rice (again, whole grain/wild is good)-most cereals (oats/oatmeal and whole grain cereals like oat bran are fine)-ice cream/sherbet/popsicles (try frozen fruit)

The learning process began when we found snack items, like granola bars and cereal, that listed the initial ingredient as “whole grain” and other ingredients that were natural and whole. They were allowed. It was also okay to eat white potatoes and corn – because, HELLO! These are real food! Nothing processed there!

I know what you may be thinking, why no honey? Because that’s what everyone else was thinking, too. It’s got beneficial health properties so why wasn’t it included? But as my friend and fellow challenger said, “we are trying to get rid of the sugar monster!” And when consumed, honey is still converted into sugar, still tastes sweet, and still activates that addiction that is sparked in most of us to keep eating more. That was the whole point of this challenge. To stop the powerful addiction that is sugar. I talk about this more in a previous post – if you ever wondered if it’s a real thing, it is.

 The other thing you may have noticed is that this was the only thing that was changed for the entire 30 days and RESULTS HAPPENED.  I did that on purpose. Oftentimes, it seems like there are more decisions that need to happen to make a real difference. Why didn’t the challenge include choosing more lean means, cutting out fried foods, or eating more fruits and veggies? While all of that stuff is important to a healthy diet, I don’t think as many would have stuck it out if they had to change it all in the 30 days.

 Pick one thing to change and surprise yourself at how consistent you are and what kind of results you get because of it.

For their specific results and testimonies, head over here and check it out!

P.S. The challenge in our group is over. But that doesn’t mean you can’t give it a go. We’d love to have and support you if you’re game! Go ahead and join my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN