Is juicing really healthy?

I’ve been asked this question quite a few times, but admittedly I haven’t had much of an opinion or any thoughts because to me, there’s no harm in juicing your fruits and vegetables, especially if you don’t like them and this will help you consume more. But is it healthier? Or does it remove nutrients that would come best from eating the whole piece of produce? I looked into it because I don’t personally “juice.”

Here’s what I found:

  1. If you aren’t exactly sure what “juicing” refers to, simply put, it just means you are squeezing the juice from fresh fruits or vegetables by using a high powered machine or your hands. The leftover liquid contains most of the vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (a.k.a. healthy stuff only found in plants.) Some people opt for juicing because they believe your body can absorb the nutrients better and it gives your digestive system a rest from working on fiber.
  2. There is an alternative form, referred to as “blending.” This will retain more of the antioxidants/phytochemicals (aka nutrition) because it preserves the whole fruit, including the peel, as demonstrated in this study when comparing juicing flesh only versus blending the entire edible portions of pears, apples, persimmons, and mandarin oranges. Same here for blending grapefruit versus juicing. I’m not surprised by that, but nonetheless there were still nutrients when these fruits were “juiced” without the fiber portions.
  3. Just my professional opinion, if for some reason you have problems digesting fiber (irritable bowel syndrome flare ups, bouts of diverticulitis, gastroparesis, etc), juicing fresh fruits and vegetables can be a great way to get in vital nutrients without the fiber. As far as those of us with healthy, normal digestive systems, I do not believe we need a “rest” from fiber. Quite opposite actually. The average American consumes about 10 grams of fiber daily when the daily recommended intake is 25-30 grams per day. We need it for lots of health reasons, particularly in our digestive tract. I’m not gong to be the one to give you a reason to eat LESS fiber. K?
  4. If blending or juicing, I actually do think it can be an excellent option for most of us who don’t eat very many fruits and vegetables and likely wouldn’t eat vegetables like kale, spinach, carrots, beet greens, pineapple, apples, citrus, pears, berries etc on a  regular basis. There are lots and lots of options and combinations to make interesting smoothie recipes and it really can be a fantastic addition to a healthy diet.

If you plan to incorporate this into your diet, I recommend replacing one meal and adding a couple of eggs or a yogurt on the side with it because a smoothie made for these purposes does not have any protein in it. If you have followed me for any length of time, you know how important it is to include protein at your meals. As much as I love the healthy goodness of fruits and veggies, you will be STARVING an hour or two later on a carb-filled smoothie like this. As an alternative, it can be perfectly acceptable to have as a mid-morning snack instead. Lastly, some of you who are considering intermittent fasting, may opt to incorporate something like this into your routine. Enjoy the recipes I’ve provided for you if you’d like to it out. Just click the picture thumbnail below to view them.

 

P.S. Last week, we started our “Fall Back into Healthy Habits” journey. It’s not too late too  join in. Just head over here for the details and how to join my support group where we will be having weekly live chats and goal setting sessions.Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN