6 tips for surviving Thanksgiving

I love Thanksgiving. It’s a time to spend with people we care about, pause to be grateful, and we don’t have to purchase any gifts (yet.) I also happen to enjoy cooking on these types of days where I get to pull out recipes that I only cook once or twice a year.

I realize for many of you, this may be stressful because you’ve worked hard all year to lose weight and get your health on a better path. Maybe past years have thrown you off track, led to unwanted weight gain, or worse, started the reversal process of hard work earlier in the year. So how about we not go through another yo yo this year?

Here are some tips that I think will help you out:

  1. Eat breakfast. Possibly it’s been tradition for you to skip all eating occasions prior to the big dinner on the big T day. But this is really a set up for overeating until discomfort. If youve been in the habit of eating a healthy breakfast every morning, wake up like you always do that morning and have your normal breakfast. If you have room for improvement int his area, focus on protein. I’ve talked about this a lot in the past, but it’s really important to start your day off with 25-30 grams of protein to keep from overeating later in the day. If you are needing ideas for what this looks like in a breakfast, click here to get my free list of 25 breakfast ideas with 25 grams of protein.
  2. Get moving. It’s a popular day to sit on the couch, watch football or whatever is on television and relax and eat if you aren’t the one doing the cooking. What if you made a resolve to go for a thirty minute walk or three -ten minute walks? Exercise also helps with energy levels and will help combat that tryptophan crash coming later on. If you want to incorporate it into the day, plan some fun outdoor activities with the family such as tossing the football, tag, hide and seek (with the kids), corn hole, sack races, etc. If you’re in the snow, do snowball fights, bobsledding, make snow angels – whatever it is you do this time of year! (I live in Florida, so it’s realistic to say we could get our bathing suites on a run around in sprinklers!)
  3. Avoid taste-testing a meals worth of calories. This one’s for the cooks. Ever cooked a meal that takes a while and by the time it’s done, you really aren’t hungry? Maybe you eat anyway, especially on a holiday because you’re with a bunch of family and you’d feel bad if you didn’t? If you haven’t sat down for an actual meal at a dinner table in well over three hours, you should feel hungry. If you aren’t, check yourself on the tasting spoons. If we’re being honest, we have prepared most of our traditional Thanksgiving dishes no less than ten times and having one taste test max (if any) is necessary. If you continue to pick at the turkey, grab a spoonful of stuffing, grab a roll, grab a slice of yams, you could end up with 500 calories under your belt (literally) before you’ve even made a plate for yourself.
    • Chew mint gum or metabolic gum (made with essential oils) to help curb cravings and appetite while you are cooking.
    • Keep some fresh raw veggies next to your cooking area like baby carrots, cut up bell peppers, and sugar snap peas to satisfy the need to “munch” while you’re preparing the meal for a fraction of the calories.
    • Limit yourself to one plastic tasting spoon per dish and throw it out after you’ve tried it.
    • Elicit help in the kitchen to keep you accountable or better yet, consider a pot luck style dinner this year.
  4. Slow down before you run for seconds. They aren’t going anywhere. When you’ve finished that first plate, there is a 99% change you’ve had more than enough food, especially on Thanskgiving Day. This year, I challenge you to wait it out 15-20 minutes before you decide if you truly need seconds to feel satisfied with the meal. You may just surprise yourself since it takes the brain that long to get triggered by your body that you’ve had enough to eat.
  5. Review your menu and decide now if anything can be modified. Usually, certain ingredients can be substituted without making any difference in the finished product. Some of my favorites include reducing the sugar by 25-30%, using low fat or fat free milk for whole or 2% milk, fat free half and half for the full fat version, greek yogurt for sour cream, fat free evaporated milk for the full fat version or heavy cream, powdered defatted peanut butter for traditional peanut butter, reducing the nuts by 25%, nuefchâtel cheese for regular cream cheese, and low sugar jelly for the regular stuff.
    • Note some ingredient items can not be changed but a good rule of thumb to remember is that “baking is a science and cooking is an art.” In scientific projects, there are going to be less items that can be modified if you want the final product to come out the same. When cooking, however, you have a lot more flexibility to experiment with and still end up with an excellent result.
  6. Don’t freak out. Just be cool about this. It’s one day. Too often people are off to a great start, wanting to get ahead of the new year’s resolution game only to disappoint themselves on turkey day and fall totally and completely off the wagon until January 1 when everyone else is waking up from their eating and shopping and televisioning slumber. If you do none of the tips I outline in this post but just put your efforts on maintaining your weight and staying on track on every day that ISN’T an actual holiday (so saying no to leftovers, over-eating at holiday parties, binging on christmas cookies at the office) then you will be just fine.

What do you struggle with most during the holidays around your diet? I’d like to know for future blog post topics so I can help you! Comment below!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

4 ways to conquer binge eating

Many people struggle with this and it ruins the best of intentions to lose weight or even just maintain your weight. You could be going along happily in your life and then boom, it hits. You know, that hard to ignore urge to binge until you’ve overdone it that ultimately ends in regret, guilt, and food restriction and/or self punishment. What if you could stop yourself before it even happens? It’s possible.

But first, let’s define what a binge truly is. Technically it’s when you are eating something that elicits the feeling of loss of control until you’ve eaten more than is a desired reasonable amount. The quantity and food varies from person to person. Person A could define a personal binge as eating 3 doughnuts while person B could define their personal binge as not until they’ve consumed the whole dozen of doughnuts. Person A could define a personal binge as consuming two servings of potato chips while person B could define their binge as eating the entire family size bag. Make sense? We all have different thresholds in this. No judgement for any quantity, it’s more about when you feel like you’ve lost your sense of self control that leads to feelings of guilt and self punishment. That’s no good for anyone.

So let’s talk about some ways to combat it:

  1. Know your triggers. Understand what sets you off in the first place and then avoid it or prepare for it when necessary. Does going to a party trigger you to binge on the chip bowl? Plan ahead of time and know that you simply can’t hang out around the food table. Does having a giant tub of ice cream in your freezer trigger you to indulge in the entire thing as soon as you’re home alone? Don’t buy it! Does having an argument with your spouse trigger you to run to the pantry and dive into the chocolate chip cookies? Put a post-it note on your pantry door that reminds you to stop and take a few deep breathes before you’re so quick to start eating when food is not what you really need at that moment.
    • Understand this, every habit we have is part of a chain that has multiple links. Each link is attached to the next that produces a result. The key is for you to break the link that results in a binge. It only takes one alteration, like a post-it note, to put a kink in that chain and direct you to a different activity.
  2. Exercise regularly. When we exercise on a regular basis, it keeps a steady stream of endorphins going in our system and helps keep our mood stabilized. It also helps us sleep better and thus, make better decisions throughout the day. Ever been sleep deprived for a few days? Remember how emotional and irrational you were? This is a high risk time for binging. In general, those who exercise just feel better about their health and body and have an easier time maintaining their weight overall.
  3. Start the day with a healthy breakfast. If you are going to skip any meal of the day, don’t let it be this one! Really work hard to eat within 2 hours of waking up and strive for 25-30 grams of protein at that meal. This helps stabilize blood sugars, control hunger later in the day, and thus keeps your mood more even making it less likely for a binge later on. Also, usually when we start our day off healthy, we are more likely to keep it going than when we started our day off not so great (say, with a sugary, high calorie breakfast).
  4. Avoid going more than 3-5 hours without eating. This one just makes sense. If you let yourself get too hungry and the setting is right, a binge is inevitable. Plan for high protein snacks such as cheese sticks, yogurt, deli meat, nuts or high fiber foods such as fresh fruits and veggies to fill in the gaps when meals are spread far apart. Find some other options here.

Lastly, this will be a work in progress for you if you have struggled with binge eating for a long time. The tips I’ve given you will help the person who struggles with occasional episodes of binge eating that they relate to either unhealthy emotions or certain situations that act as triggers for them. I am not referring to someone who has a recognized binge eating disorder which is characterized by behaviors far beyond what is described in this blog post. If you find yourself preplanning binge episodes, eating large quantities of food (in the multiple thousand calorie range) in very short periods of time, purposely eating alone out of embarrassment over the quantity of food eaten, and feelings of “zoning out” and even forgetting what food was consumed during these episodes, you may have an eating disorder and I encourage you to seek professional help from a licensed counselor.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

9 foods we feel guilty about loving

I thought it might be fun to highlight some foods that you may not be eating in an attempt to stay healthy or may be eating laced with guilt. And put a positive spin on them. I know I have gone through periods of my life where I’ve avoided just about all of these foods because at one time they were deemed “bad for you” and then later as “health foods.” I think it comes down to knowing that if it’s a whole food – as in something you can visualize growing in nature or at least close to it, it’s probably okay, at least in small amounts. Remember there is never going to be a cookie or a pizza tree. But you are always going to see the potato roots and the cows out grazing.

  1. Sugar: earlier this year, I hosted a 30 day “no sugar” challenge and the results were fantastic. Because truly, sugar can be addicting and I’m convinced the only way one can overcome that is through a period of elimination. However, if you are attempting to cut the bitter in your coffee, a packet of sugar is only going to add 15 calories. So don’t sweat it. If it’s someone’s birthday and you want to help them celebrate with a slice of cake, go ahead. If you love an occasional soda with your slice of pizza (they go great together), then have one. The research is strong that consuming drinks and foods made with artificial sweeteners do not help with weight loss.
  2. Whole Milk: for the longest time, fat free or low fat was where it was at. Until recently. In past posts, I’ve discussed how full fat dairy products are linked to decreased risk of diabetes and at best, not linked to increased heart disease risk. Certainly, it is well known milk is an excellent source of calcium and vitamin D, important for bone health.
  3. Bacon: if chosen wisely, bacon can be more than a hunk of fat. It can actually be a tasty source of protein. The natural, uncured, nitrite/nitrate free, center cuts will be higher in protein, less saturated fat and without the unnecessary additives that may be linked to increased cancer risk.
  4. Salt: if you have been diagnosed with heart or kidney disease, then you may have been told to reduce or avoid salt. Have you ever wondered why? It comes down to fluid retention – eat salty foods, get thirsty, drink more water. This isn’t good for someone who is collecting fluid around their heart or lungs or for someone who’s kidneys aren’t filtering the fluids out of their body correctly. For the rest of us, we probably aren’t that salt sensitive and can handle it. For table salt, I recommend pink himalayan salt for the added minerals. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying to go out and eat all the salty processed snacks you can find – they still aren’t considered health foods and contain a ton of additives and preservatives without the nutritional benefits you get from whole foods. But for those of us with normal functioning organs, we can probably handle it for the most part.
  5. Bread: it really depends on the how and why. Are you eating a sandwich? And what is on the sandwich? Usually in this manner, the bread is in two controlled slices and serving a purpose. Unfortunately though, the favorite way to eat bread is in the form of an endless loaf or basket of rolls and tub of butter. It’s really all in context.
  6. Potatoes: no, I’m not talking about sweet potatoes. I’m talking about the good ole white potatoes we all love to demonize. Sure, if you are eating chips or french fries, go ahead and continue to hate them. But what about a baked potato? They are actually rich in folate, niacin, potassium, and and phosphorous. Much of the time, we are eating processed cereals fortified with these minerals, but potatoes are natural sources, which means our bodies can absorb them better. Try a loaded baked potato and salad for lunch or dinner – add plain greek yogurt in place of sour cream for extra protein. And eat the skin for extra insoluble fiber.
  7. Pasta: okay, it’s hard to make this a health food, but hear me out. The problem is when we pile a giant heap of pasta on a plate with an ooey gooey cream sauce and a side of buttery garlic bread. Instead think of what is called the “plate method.” This means, you are filling your plate up with about 25-30% pasta, 50% non starchy vegetables, and 25-30% meat. This could be sectioned out or mixed together in a  pasta dish. Point is, your pasta dish has more vegetables than pasta and the side is a salad not a few slices of garlic bread. Make sense?
  8. Red meat: while I don’t necessarily recommend eating red meat every day, this is a good source of iron and B vitamins if consumed once a week. Remember that cuts like sirloin, round, and flank are considered lean. If choosing a higher fat option, just be sure to cut the visible fat off before consuming. Our bodies are able to absorb minerals easier from meat than plants or fortified sources so if you do eat meat and have trouble with iron, this is a better option. For those of you that are anemic and struggle with iron, you know that taking supplements is no pleasant task because of the side effects. Last week, I talked about choosing grass fed meat, which incidentally tends to be your leanest choice.
  9. Eggs: once thought to be a cause of heart disease, that is no longer true. Eggs are an excellent source of choline, which is important for supporting healthy brain function and liver function. Also an easy, cheap source of protein for not only breakfast, but snack time and lunch or dinner.

Did I give you permission to start eating any of these foods more often? Let me know in the comments.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Does intermittent fasting have health benefits?

Sigh….I know! I know! It’s confusing. Every other week, a new diet approach. Keto. Vegan. Paleo. Here we go again. Bottom line is, there is no one diet fits all and part of what I do for you is give you the most up to date research available. Intermittent fasting is a new buzz phrase going around the internet health circles and to my surprise, there is no shortage of research surrounding this method of meal planning. It has definitely sparked curiosity amongst the science and health communities, particularly about its effects on obesity, insulin resistance, sleep cycles, and fat metabolism.

First, what exactly does intermittent fasting mean? Well, it’s what it sounds like….most commonly it involves a period of 2 days per week, every week, of no food whatsoever. However, some alternate days of fasting where every other day they eat and drink what they want and the opposite days they consume zero calories. And then there are some methods that specify time periods of each day where food is allowed and food is not. Usually you are allowed calorie-free fluids, but that’s it. The theory is that our body needs a “break” from food on a regular basis to produce health benefits. But what does the research actually say? These are the questions I’m going to attempt to answer.

1. Does it help with weight loss? This is really the million dollar question in my mind. I preach not to go more than 5-6 hours without eating because, after all, it actually slows your metabolism down and our bodies are designed to hoard calories when we don’t eat. Think of your body as if it were a car: food to the body is like gas is to a car. Without it, the body has no energy to move, which means the body is like a car that has run out of gas, parked on the side of the road….no fuel, nothing to burn. I’ve worked with so many clients who did not start losing weight until they started eating more often. Most drastic example I can think of is a woman who weighed more than 500 pounds and consumed only one meal per day that probably totaled to about 800 calories. She could not, for anything, lose weight. A month later, after eating double the calories, three meals a day with some snacks in between, she LOST weight. But that’s just my story, let’s look at some scientific studies.

In this small study of sixteen non-obese individuals, they lost an average of 2.5% of their starting weight after twenty-two days, so just three weeks, of alternate day fasting. However, they were HUNGRY. And that hunger never subsided. Do you think they kept at it after the study? A 5’5″ woman is technically overweight, but not obese, at 165 pounds….so if you lost four pounds in three weeks and you were starving, would you keep it at? Or find another diet, like the keto diet that is known to reduce hunger? It should be noted however that fat oxidation was increased during the study period, which means they were losing mostly fat mass and not muscle mass, this is a really good thing considering you want to keep your muscle mass when losing weight. These people did not maintain their losses, regrettably.

Here is a review highlighting several studies on alternate day fasting and comparing them to normal, calorie restricted diets (you know, the traditional method of weight loss you’ve probably tried a gazillion times.) They concluded that indeed, fasting is superior to producing weight loss and particularly, loss of fat mass. Pretty neat, huh? I’ve talked about the importance of this for preserving your metabolic rate in the past.

This last study compared individuals following an alternate day fast vs. combining it with exercise vs. exercise alone vs. a control group. These particular subjects were allowed a controlled, prepared meal that was provided for them around lunch time on the fast days. The meal was restricted to 450 calories and otherwise, calorie free beverages only. Feed days they could eat what they wanted, but they were given dietary counseling by a dietitian. Sounds pretty good, right? You may guess by now that the combo and alternate day fast group lost the most weight after twelve weeks at six and three kilograms (13.2 and 6.6 pounds), respectively. Again, most of the weight they lost was fat mass, not muscle. Awesome, right? It needs to be pointed out here though that they measured body fat using bio-impedance, which I’m not a fan of for accuracy….it’s the same kind you might use on your bathroom scale. Regardless, people are apparently losing the good kinda weight with intermittent fasting.

2. Does intermittent fasting improves insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes risk? I found lots about this one, too. The caution here if you have type 2 diabetes is that if you are taking medications that lower your blood sugar intentionally, many of the medications will not work without food OR they will work too well and cause hypoglycemia. So I’m going to begin this with an up front warning that what I’m about to say is not to be started without speaking to your doctor first if you are taking medications for diabetes. Okay?

In this pilot study (so just preliminary) on ten obese individuals, they experienced a reduction in their weight, body mass index, and fasting blood sugars after only two weeks. They fasted daily and only ate during a window of about six hours during mid-afternoon. Apparently they didn’t gorge themselves, because the article did say there was a spontaneous reduction in calorie intake measured from pictures they were required to take of all meals and food they consumed (talk about accountability!). At two weeks, this study really wasn’t long enough to say much, but six out of the ten said they would do it again.

In this study done on a small group twenty-four obese male war veterans, they did not see a significant change in fasting blood glucose or fasting lipids after six months of intermittent fasting (two nonconsecutive days a week.) Interestingly enough, their systolic blood pressures lowered and they did lose an average of twelve pounds…pretty good!

Lastly, in this review of several studies on the effects of intermittent fasting and insulin resistance, primarily reduction of type 2 diabetes risk, they concluded that the findings are showing promise for the use of alternate day fasting as an alternative to the traditional calorie restricted diets, but more research is required before solid conclusions can be reached.  I perused some of their reference articles and the theme seems to be that the results are more profound in mice than humans so far. There was another review I thought gave some really good insight and from what I gather, if you are going to try intermittent fasting for the purposes of improving your blood sugars and/or insulin resistance, focus on fasting during the evening times specifically. 

3. Does intermittent fasting help you sleep better? I bring this one up because we know that poor sleep habits lead to weight gain. So wouldn’t it be cool if there was a diet that could help you sleep better? I found two studies that looked at this. The first one was on eight volunteers who honored Ramadan, a religious period of fasting between dawn and sunset celebrated by the Islamic culture. They measured their melatonin levels via blood tests at baseline, during, and after. Unfortunately, they did not find any differences related to fasting. However, in this study, eight overweight individuals self reported better sleep when participating in time restricted fasting (food allowed <12 hours daily) for sixteen weeks. Subjective measurements are not usually as reliable, but these people obviously felt more refreshed waking up.

So what’s the verdict? Would you participate in fasting for a day or two per week or pick several hours each day to fast based on the evidence available? Seems like the information is promising, but the studies are small and preliminary. As for me, I’m not sure if I’m personally jumping on this bandwagon quite yet knowing there are other diets that are much easier to follow than this one.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Foods that naturally boost your metabolism

First off, let’s start with a little background because most people who struggle with their weight are tempted to blame their metabolism for the difficulty they are experiencing. If you have a longstanding history of weight cycling, aka yo yo dieting, a slow metabolism may very well be your problem – for the purposes of this post, that is what the main focus will be. So what happens to your metabolism when you weight cycle, aka “yo yo” diet?

1. First, you lose a lot of fat mass (good thing) but a lot of muscle mass too (unavoidable with rapid weight loss, not a good thing)
2. If it was not a sustainable diet (often it’s not), then the weight piles back on at lightning speed, but this time it is all mostly replaced with fat mass.
3. Fat burns less calories than muscle = your metabolism tanks. Next time you try to diet, it doesn’t come off as easily or fast.
4. Over time, chronic dieters find themselves with a slower and slower metabolism because they keep losing muscle and replacing it with fat. It’s a viscous cycle that eventually makes it almost impossible for weight loss success to occur.

Fear not, if this all sounds too familiar and you think you are in this situation, I’ve done a little research for you and found some promising ways to boost your metabolism, naturally.

  • Tomato juice: in a 2015 study published by the NIH, menopausal women aged 40-60 who consumed 200 ml unsalted tomato juice twice daily experienced an increased in resting energy expenditure (REE) by an average of 400 calories
    Bottom line: drink 200 milliliters twice a day (about 6 ounces twice a day). Hey, it’s not gonna hurt anything.
  • Cinnamon: in a 2012 study published by the International Journal of Preventative Medicine, one group of individuals took cinnamon supplements every day, while the other group took a placebo. After 8 weeks, the cinnamon group lost more weight and body fat than the group taking the placebo.
    Bottom line: add cinnamon to your food or try the pure essential oil for a more concentrated version. Contact me if you are interested in learning more about brands I trust and recommend. remember, supplements are not regulated and therefore, may not be free of contaminants.
  • Coffee: most studies with caffeine in doses of about 100mg per day (6 ounces of coffee) showed an increased calorie burn between 75 and 110 calories for the entire day. There are other sources of caffeine, but coffee is a calorie free source that actually contains some antioxidants.
    Bottom line: have some caffeine before exercise to maximize the calorie burring effects if you are going to try this one. Hey, I love coffee, why  not?
  • Grapefruit: A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food in 2006 showed that obese patients who consumed 8 oz of grapefruit juice or 1/2 of a grapefruit before each meal lost about 3.5 lbs after 12 weeks, without making any other changes to their diets. Participants in the study who consumed a grapefruit capsule before meals also lost weight — but just 2.2 pounds over the 12 weeks. The placebo group did not lose weight.
    Bottom line: drink 8 ounces grapefruit juice, eat 1/2 grapefruit daily, or take a grapefruit capsule with meals (I recommend with 2-3 drops pure essential oil in each one, contact me for recommended brands)
  • Lean Protein: Eggs, chicken, fish, low-fat yogurt, low-fat cheese, turkey
    The “thermic effect of food” (TEF) is the energy we use to digest food into small, absorbable components. Protein burns more calories to digest than carbs & fats. It also takes longer to digest, keeping you fuller longer.
    Bottom line: include 30 grams protein at meals, 8-10 grams of protein at snacks, and eat every 3-5 hours
  • Ginger: promotes digestion and stimulates metabolism, which leads to increased calorie burning. In animal studies, it increased metabolisms by 20%. In human studies, most herbal supplements taken internally increase metabolic rates by 2 to 5% tops. Every little bit helps! In a small, but very interesting pilot study, it was shown to enhance the thermic effect of food and increase the feeling of fullness after a meal. Bottom line: add it to your foods (we aren’t animals); you could also try the pure essential oil for a more concentrated source. If youve never cooked with essential oils, visit my previous post here.

What about appetite suppressants?

There are a few medical options that can help. I’ve talked them in the past along with habits that can help. In the spirit of natural options, here are some effective options I found in  my research:

  • Peppermint Oil: in its food grade, it is used often in the candy and dental industries (seems like an oxymoron, huh?). There is a reason for those after dinner mints! Because of the strong smell, it has an appetite suppressing effect in its purity. Try brushing your teeth after dinner, chewing mint gum while cooking, or diffusing peppermint essential oil to take advantage of this benefit.
  • Water: dehydration often leads to excessive hunger and even sugar cravings, especially chronic dehydration. Aim to consume half of your body weight in ounces of water daily. Add citrus for flavor and extra cleansing benefits. My personal favorite is pure lemon essential oil. Better yet, add fresh squeezed grapefruit juice or grapefruit essential oil.
  • Capsaicin: as in chili peppers. Ever notice you eat less when you have an extra spicy dish? This is why. Unless you are a glutton for punishment, of course.

Let me know what you try and feel free to reach out to me if you are interested in learning more about incorporating essential oils into your weight management routine.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Is weight loss surgery the easy way out?

No, no it isn’t. If you opted for weight loss surgery, don’t ever let anyone tell you that you took the easy way out. If you know someone who opted for it, realize that the decision was most likely made after hours and hours of intense thought and discussion amongst family members and key medical providers. It involves drastic lifestyle changes with a serious commitment to habit alterations. But it’s lifesaving and as I said in my recent post, it is often the best decision that person has ever made for their health.

My goal for this post is to explain the options in the simplest way possible and drive home the fact that, although weight loss surgery may be the most successful end point for weight loss known to date, it certainly is not the easy way out. It’s only a tool, but a damn good one at that.

So here we go, let’s start with the laparoscopic banding procedure. Nothing is changed from your inside anatomy. So you still have your full stomach and intestines intact. The band is purely a restrictive procedure and is just what it sounds like, a band (think of it like a bracelet even) that is placed around the top portion of the stomach. At first, it’s just a fancy expensive bracelet. Shortly after surgery, it can be filled with a salt solution, called saline, to tighten its grip around the stomach, by injecting the fluid through a port that runs from the band to just under your skin. Think of it as blowing up a doughnut ring….that hole in the middle is gonna get tighter when it’s blown up. Problem is, this procedure doesn’t work. I know, that’s a bold statement for me to say, but in the ten years I’ve worked with bariatric surgery candidates, I only saw maybe three patients (out of hundreds) lose the expected 20-25% of their initial starting weight and maintain it off for more than one year. And guess what? All of them eventually had to have their bands removed due to complications and/or weight regain. Luckily, their bands were converted to the sleeve gastrectomy and they were able to continue their lives with a more permanent option.

People see the band as the “noninvasive, less risky” choice. However, that’s just not true. When you have a foreign object placed in your body, it doesn’t like it. The band can slip out of place, corrode, grow into the stomach, get infected, flip over and out of place, the port tubing can get a hole in it and leak, and the possibilities go on and on. Most often, one of two things would happen. I either saw people throw up over and over because food just wouldn’t go down where the band was and eventually their esophagus above the band placement would dilate, or get bigger, and they would end up with essentially two stomachs to fill. Think of it like an hour glass, one on top and one on the bottom….endless hunger. Or I saw them give up and live on liquid, soft foods that slid through the band into the stomach easier…..so milkshakes, pudding, ice cream, jello, mashed potatoes, and even fried foods. It’s not uncommon for someone to even gain weight after this procedure, as you could imagine. Some facilities have smartened up and don’t offer the band anymore. In my opinion, if a surgeon recommends the band to you, run the other way.

The sleeve gastrectomy has gotten lots of attention over the past five years or so for those who have a lot of weight to lose but may or may not have any major health problems. It is a purely restrictive procedure as the surgeon removes around 75-80% of the stomach in a vertical fashion, leaving a banana shape left. Don’t be mistaken, though, your stomach ends up smaller than a banana. Think “man’s index finger” size. It is very restrictive, but what I think helps people out the most is that the part of the stomach that gets removed is also the part that produces the hunger hormone, ghrelin.

So, yea, you may fill up on the same amount of food your two year old niece just ate, but you weren’t really hungry to begin with. And if you have read or listened to any of my content before, you may have heard me talk about how ghrelin increases in production in response to massive weight loss. It can’t with the sleeve gastrectomy. That’s a big plus. I do caution people against choosing this procedure if they have problems with stress or emotional eating or what I call “grazing.” If you don’t eat because of excessive hunger and you have a habit of nitpicking all day long out of boredom or stress, this procedure doesn’t do anything to stop that….you can still eat a small amount of food every couple of hours or so. You can’t, however, sit down to a large meal and finish it in your normal ten minutes. It’s going to take at least twenty minutes to finish off a 1/3 cup of ground turkey. Talk about eating to live! Expected weight loss is anywhere from 25 to 35% of your starting weight. This is life changing for the vast majority of those that are are successful at it.

The last procedure I’m going to talk about here is the roux en y gastric bypass. This one has gotten a bad rep for years which is why I believe there are so many new procedures constantly up and coming, like the stomach stapling at one time, then the lap band, now the sleeve, and the up and coming “balloon” (that’s for another post). But this one has stood the test of time for the last forty years now and remains the gold standard of weight loss surgery. Is it drastic? Yes. Does it involve a huge lifestyle change? Oh yes. Does it work? Yes. I’ve seen lives absolutely change for the better and people leave the hospital off their diabetes medications after having this surgery. There was no waiting period for weight loss, it was immediate. When we talk about this surgery, we are talking about a metabolic operation that changes the body’s hormones with some major rerouting of your digestive system. So, like the sleeve gastrectomy, hunger is no longer an issue. Nothing is actually removed, like in the sleeve, but the part of the stomach that produces the hunger hormone, ghrelin, no longer comes into contact with food. The major difference is that a large portion of the small intestines is rerouted to create a “Y” shape with the new, smaller, egg-shaped stomach and connected lower down the digestive tract which results in calorie malabsorption. Not only are you not hungry and restricted in how much you can eat in one sitting, but you also don’t absorb all the calories you eat at one time. Lastly, high sugar and high fat foods are a no go. You run a high risk of getting sick with the shakes, diarrhea, and breaking out in sweats if you eat even just one small bite of the wrong thing. Interestingly enough, lots of people who have had this surgery experience a change in their taste preferences anyway.

Since expected weight loss is closer to 35% starting weight, I recommend this procedure for the stress eater, person with a slow metabolism, chronic yo yo dieter, and most importantly, anyone with a serious health condition who requires massive weight loss to improve. This would include cardiovascular disease, obstructive sleep apnea, or diabetes.

This is your life, and if someone told you there was a cure for a known disease that you have, would you take it? In 2013, the American Medical Association recognized obesity as a chronic disease. At that point, health insurance companies began expanding their coverage for weight loss surgeries. A chronic disease is something that never really goes away. If you have been struggling with your weight, you know what I’m talking about. You succeed at a weight loss attempt temporarily, but the weight always finds its way back, somehow. I know that this is not for everybody and you may note even qualify.

If it is something you are considering or if you are in a place where you don’t quite qualify, but you’d like some help with your weight, feel free to reach out to me at the below links.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Does your stomach really shrink when you eat less?

As a specialist in weight loss, I hear this phrase a lot, “I just need to shrink my stomach so I can get used to eating less.”

In reality, throughout life, the adult stomach stays about the same, which is the size of a football. However, the stomach is a muscle that can be stretched temporarily to fit more in should the occasion occur. How much we eat tends to be more dictated by habit and hormones rather than size, however.

A little anatomy for you. (I promise, just a little.) There are three very basic parts of the stomach: the top (the fundus), the middle (the body), and the bottom (the pylorus), which is where food empties out into your intestines. The the fundus, is the stretchy part that can expand a bit to allow more food to fit if necessary. It is not likely that the entire body of the stomach is going to expand to allow more food. Back to the football, if you can visualize how much chewed up food that would really mean, it’s quite a lot. However, our body regulates our appetite with hormones that send signals to our brain to tell us whether we’ve eaten enough or not – this is independent of how full the stomach is. Those hormones play a very big role in weight regulation and can be easily over-ridden by outside cues (i.e. the food tastes really good, it’s Thanksgiving, etc.)

Now back to the fundus. This upper muscle is why there’s always room for dessert, but maybe not another immediate meal. It takes about two full hours for the meal to completely empty down to the lower  stomach, out and travel into the small intestine. If you overdo it by eating too much too fast or adding some dessert at the end, that fundus is going to allow for some extra room. For those that habitually overdo it, the tolerance is going to grow over time for allowance. For those that don’t, it’s gonna be more uncomfortable and you’ll be less likely to keep doing it. When you go on a diet and purposely under eat for a couple of weeks, that fundus will become less stretchy and you’ll feel like your stomach has “shrunk.” But it really hasn’t. Weird, huh?

Competitive eaters use this to their advantage and train that muscle over time to allow them to eat a lot in one sitting without puking. I’m not suggesting you do that since I’m assuming you read my blog for help with weight loss, not competitive eating.

In someone who has had weight loss surgery, the body and possibly the pylorus of the stomach has been removed or bypassed, leaving about the size of an egg left. That’s not a lot and it creates some massive restriction. Because this part of the stomach is a muscle and can still stretch, it doesn’t stay that restricted for good. However, the tolerance for over-eating is much less, so the individual usually never gets back to having a football size stomach and still experiences permanent food restriction. If you know someone who had weight loss surgery and regained all or some of their weight because they “stretched their stomach back out,” this may be what’s going on. That’s for another blog post, though.

Hope you found this helpful and enjoyed a little weird science today!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded women striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Why it’s not risky to have weight loss surgery

Although I have never personally been overweight, I am an advocate for those who are. It’s not because I watched a family member struggle or have some heart wrenching personal story to share with you. Circumstances ten years ago just lead me to a position working with people who do struggle with weight.

Through that time, I have gotten to know hundreds, if not thousands, of individuals and their personal stories, and why there is so much more to weight loss than “eat less, exercise more.” I’ve helped a lot of people make the scary decision to pursue weight loss surgery, get their habits (and their mind) right on the way there, and I’ve been there that amazing day when they became a literal new person. So much so, I couldn’t even recognize them standing right next to me as I called them into my office for that two month post surgery check up.

I’ve cried with clients, done happy dances with them when the scale hit a certain number, and held the trash can when they needed to vomit because they ate something they shouldn’t have (yea, sucks to do that in your dietitian’s office.) I’ve been the first person to weigh someone after years and years of avoiding the scale. I’ve been the last person to see someone drink a soda before they chucked it in the trash can for good (carbonation isn’t allowed after weight loss surgery if you were wondering.) I’ve also been the first person to find out they’re going for it, for realz. It’s scary, it’s exciting, it’s terrifying, and it’s truly life changing.

Here’s the deal though, I don’t want to hear that “bariatric surgery is high risk” from people who know nothing about it other than that their brother’s coworker’s aunt’s mother in law had that “stomach stapling” procedure back in the 80s and died. Don’t ever take the excitement away from someone by telling them it’s too risky. 

I do get it. I’ve worked with two or three people out of hundreds that had the surgery and it went terribly wrong. They can’t eat food anymore because they had a rare complication. They get to live on a feeding tube for the rest of their life. I’ve gotten to know a couple of individuals who died months later because their health problems before surgery were against them and weight loss surgery didn’t fix it. It sucked. But they were exceptions, more on this later.

But I’ve also seen people get out of wheelchairs, off their diabetes medications, go on vacations again, and live life out of the house again because of this surgery. And that “stomach stapling” or “risky gastro procedure” everyone is so scared of, was actually life saving to someone that used to spend their entire life dieting without success, counting pills, administering injections, and going to doctor visits because their body became a prison.

If you think it’s about eating less and exercising more, think again. Obesity is not a lifestyle choice. If it was, there would be zero obese people in this world trying to lose weight. Everyone would wake up, cherry pick their dream weight and get to it. But if you’re reading this, you probably know that’s not true.

Here are 5 well meaning reasons why I’ve heard weight loss surgery is an unsafe choice and why they are false. If it’s something you’ve been considering but have been convinced it’s a “last ditch effort,” I want to give you some peace of mind to make a rationale choice. I’m not here to tell you to go do it, but I don’t want you to not go do it out of fear, either.

  1. You could die. Obesity itself is the number 2 cause of preventable death (aside from smoking) in the United States today. In this analysis of 13,871 morbidly obese patients from a national registry between January 1996 and January 2006, the risk of death within 60 days following any weight loss procedure was 0.25%, making it a rare event. A main reason for this is because modern day procedures are typically done laparoscopically, meaning only 5 small incisions about one inch in length each are made to perform the procedure rather than a long vertical incision as used to be made. Medicine is always evolving!
  2. It’s a cop out. And you could die. Okay, this is kind of a continuation of the first, but I felt needed more clarification. Bariatric surgery is emerging as a powerful weapon against severe obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Numerous studies confirm that weight loss surgery, particularly Roux en y gastric bypass surgery is more effective at bringing those with T2DM into disease remission than those who were undergoing conventional medical therapy. Some studies that back this up include this one, this one, this one, and this one. But there are several more available in case you need more proof. As a reminder, complications of long term, uncontrolled diabetes include: kidney failure, often requiring dialysis, neuropathy leading to toe and/or foot amputations, and heart disease. Not one of these are known complications of weight loss surgery.
  3. You’re going to throw up a lot. Well, yes, if you don’t follow strict dietary guidelines. I get it, this is not a lifestyle for everyone. It requires consuming adequate amounts of nutrition, 5-6 times/day, when you’re barely hungry. It also means you will be preplanning your meals every day, for the rest of your life, including the small details like quantities, calories, and protein grams. You will also need to be picky about what restaurants you choose when and if you decide to eat out in restaurants. Be prepared to eat slower. A lot slower. And chew well. Choose your food wisely. No room for fillers here when your stomach is the size of an egg. So no air swallowing habits either, like chewing gum or soda. Eat the wrong food item and you may be sorry for hours or days following.
  4. You’ll have no energy. Actually, if you’re frame has been carrying an extra 50-100 pounds it’s not supposed to be carrying and all of the sudden, in a very short person of time (say, 4-6 months?), you lose it 50 plus pounds, just like that? Wouldn’t ya think the opposite would be true? Think of it more like this: you’ve been carrying a 75 pounds back pack for a few years and I just took it off. How would that feel? This doesn’t really matter what your starting weight is, either. 75 pounds is 75 pounds.  You will also be forced to eat better with surgery, that’s part of what the surgery is for. Run through the drive through with some friends and a cheeseburger real quick and you’ll be running to puke. It’s just what happens when you’re digestive system is rearranged and shortened. Better diet = more energy.
  5. You’ll just gain it all back, so why bother going through that? Not true. Statically, 20% or 1 in 5 individuals who have weight loss surgery will regain all of the weight lost following surgery. But that also means 80% or 4 in 5 will maintain that loss. Those who do not have surgery? If your body mass index is above 30, the sad and terrible truth is, statistically <1% of individuals will maintain any weight off. I know….

In case you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m a pretty big proponent of weight loss surgery. This may surprise you, but like I said, I’ve worked with lots of people and I know their struggle. I’m also a big proponent of taking control of your own life, whatever that may mean for you…and I’m here to help you on that journey. I’ve got a ton of posts for the non-surgery folk too, so look around!

There are various types of surgeries, but the two most effective and common choices available today are the laparoscopic roux-en-y gastric bypass and the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. If you want to know more about them, I encourage you to talk with your doctor. This post would go on forever if I described them here, but certainly feel free to reach out to me for resources if you want to know what they are.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Drink coffee and eat cheese to lower your diabetes risk?

It’s no secret that obesity is an epidemic in the United States and many other developed countries. Because of that, comorbid conditions that are related to extra weight are on the rise. Of particular interest is Type 2 Diabetes, a condition where your body cannot use insulin properly to regulate your blood sugar levels, causing hyperglycemia (aka high blood sugar.)

A quick science lesson to understand what’s going on in someone who has diabetes: insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that is necessary to move glucose (sugar) molecules into our body’s cells for energy. Every cell in the body requires glucose to function. If those glucose molecules are hanging out in the blood stream, they aren’t doing their job and instead, are creating problems like blurred vision, excessive hunger/thirst and fatigue because the body is essentially acting like you haven’t eaten. Chronically high blood sugars lead to heart disease, kidney failure, and permanent nerve damage. No organ can function correctly in a thick, syrupy-like bloodstream.

This is why prevention and management of diabetes is so important. It can absolutely be diet controlled and I’ve witnessed many individuals be able to get off of their diabetes meds with enough weight loss and diet modifications. It’s possible. But always better to not have it to begin with since diabetes is not curable. Note, I’m only referring to Type 2 diabetes here. Type 1 is genetic, usually diagnosed in childhood, and happens when the pancreas produces no insulin at all. It is unrelated to lifestyle factors. 

So what foods increase your risk? Let’s start there since more than 29 million Americans are living with diabetes, and 86 million are living with pre-diabetes. Many of those unaware. Some risk factors like age, genetics, race, and family history are out of our control. However, one thing we can do is choose what we put on our plates. Emerging research has some interesting results on just exactly what to choose and what to ditch.

Foods that increase risk:

  • refined/processed carbohydrates such as crackers, cereal, white bread, cookies, snack cakes, chips, pastries, etc. Interestingly, those marketed as “low-fat, fat-free, and low carb” are also linked to an increased diabetes risk. Why? Because they are still processed!
  • red meat (according to this study “red meat” included beef, pork, and lamb)
  • processed red meat (think bacon, hot dogs, sausage, salami, bologna, etc)
  • sugary drinks like fruit juice with added sugars, soda, fruit punch, lemonade, sweet tea, etc

Foods that have a neutral effect (at least for now):

  • butter
  • poultry (according to the research, the evidence is not clear if it increases or decreases risk)
  • 100% fruit juice without added sugars
  • eggs (can we all just agree it’s okay to eat eggs already?)
  • fish (although may decrease risk in some Asian populations)

Foods that decrease risk:

  • green leafy, vegetables
  • nuts
  • whole grains (unrefined, with the bran still intact)
  • monounsaturated fats (such as avocados, nut butters, mixed nuts)
  • high-fat dairy products (cheese, cream, whole milk, kefir, yogurt) *you read that right, check it out here
  • coffee (add some cream! who else is getting excited? It’s true, really I’m not lying to justify my addiction.)
  • tea
  • alcohol (2 drink limit for men, 1-1.5 drink limit for women, but no need to start if you don’t) *you read that right, too

Much of the research cited is from food frequency questionnaires on large scale studies. As you may know from my previous posts, this method of data collection is not the most reliable, but it’s difficult to control human behavior, especially when it comes to diet over a long period of time. Either way, I think these lists of food gives us some valuable insight on what we can control in our own life.

Lastly, remember that your diabetes risk increases after the age of 45, exercising less than three times per week, being overweight, and having a family history of diabetes. 

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

9 reasons why people are following a dairy-free diet

If you aren’t avoiding dairy like the plague, you probably know someone who does. If you don’t, you may have heard that it’s best to choose the full fat versions over the fat free or low fat. And what about those hormones? Should you choose organic? A dairy alternative?

What’s what? Why are they avoiding it? And should you? Let’s start with two of the biggest, most glaring reasons why someone would want to avoid dairy:

1. Lactose intolerance. In fact, according to the National Institutes of Health, as many as 65% of adults in the U.S. suffer from this – ya know, that bloated, uncomfortable gassy feeling that sends you to the bathroom after you’ve drinking a glass of milk or just eaten a bowl of ice cream?. It’s not an allergy, but just simply the body’s inability to digest lactose, the sugar found in milk, because it lacks the necessary enzyme, lactase, to break it down. It’s actually rare before the age of two. Milk is a big no no here, but often this includes cheese, cottage cheese, ice cream, and yogurt in large quantities. Those who have Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Celiac Disease, Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, or Diverticulosis will more than likely also have lactose intolerance. Many lactose-free options have been developed over the years such as Lactaid milk and my personal favorite, Fair Life ultra filtered high protein milk which now has available options to include DHA omega-3 fatty acids.

2. Milk allergy: this is more than just an intolerance to the lactose enzyme. Understand that an allergy is very different in that it is defined as a damaging immune response by the body to a substance. There is no tolerating even a yogurt or lactose free option if they want to avoid hives, anaphylaxis, or whatever it is that their body does in response to milk protein.

If you don’t fall into the above two categories, you may want to explore some of the other reasons with me to find out why people have sworn off dairy before you decide if you are joining the bandwagon or not:

1. Dairy is an acne-trigger: TRUE. Some research does, in fact show that high intakes of dairy are linked to moderate to severe acne in teenagers and young women due to the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) found in milk. The IGF-1 is the primary mediator for the growth hormone and is present in pregnant milk-producing cows. I believe this hormone and others is to blame for why many people are so nervous about consuming cow’s milk and have made the switch to one of the many alternatives available on the market today. Read on.

2. It contains harmful hormones: FALSE. As with with above, the word hormone gets people nervous and thus, there has been lots of public concern over the synthetic hormone, recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST), that leaks (in miniscule amounts) into our dairy products from pregnant cows. What exactly is it and why is it used? Simply put, it helps the cows produce more milk, i.e. increases efficiency and productivity for their ahem, job. In fact, it’s been studied extensively in it’s twenty years in use and in this most recent review of those many studies, has been concluded totally safe. You have likely seen organic rbST-free milk and yogurt options available in your local grocery store and assumed they were better. From what I have researched, these are in response to market demand, not necessarily safety concerns. If I find out any differently, I will tell you. Promise. If you are still concerned, you have those available to choose from and certainly, if you are acne prone, go for them.

3. Dairy has been linked to certain types of cancer: FALSE except for possibly prostate, which remains inconclusive. In a 2015 analysis of 22 prospective cohort studies (1,566,940 participants), they concluded dairy was associated with a decrease in breast cancer incidence. And again, a study published last month (June 2017), they indicated after analyzing the results of 13 different studies (493,415 participants and 7453 cases) that increased calcium intake coming from diet and supplements was associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer. In another review, published at the end of last year, they concluded that cow’s milk is indeed associated with a reduced risk of colorectal, bladder, and gastric cancer as well but neutral for ovarian, pancreatic, and lung. With that many participants and cases, they make a strong argument. The jury remains out for prostate as there has been evidence that dairy raises the risk of prostate cancer, particularly because of the presence of the IGF-1 hormone. Stay clear if you’re a male and have a strong family history for now….in my opinion. It’ cancer, after all.

4. It raises diabetes risk: FALSE. In a 2016 analysis that included 22 cohort studies comprising of 579,832 individuals and 43,118 Type 2 diabetes cases, total dairy consumption, particularly from low-fat yogurt was associated with a reduced risk. Although another study found no difference using full fat yogurt, suggesting the benefits came from the fact that yogurt is rich in probiotics and the fat content is not as important. Lots of human subjects here, that’s what I like to see in results.

  • 5. It causes inflammation: TRUE, maybe. Looking at 78 studies, it really was a toss-up. This review concluded that dairy products, especially fermented ones, like yogurt, are anti-inflammatory. However, for people who have a known dairy allergy, it is definitely pro-inflammatory. Makes sense, that’s kinda what an allergic response is. As far as what it was that caused the dairy to be inflammatory, they did find more of an association with the dairy products highest in saturated fat.

6. It’s fattening and raises risk of heart disease: FALSE. In the same review, they discussed how in actuality, full fat dairy products raise HDL levels (a good thing). Although whole milk dairy products do tend to increase LDL cholesterol as well, understand that there are two types – small particle and large particle. The small, dense particle size are the ones that are more susceptible to oxidation and artery wall build-up, whereas the large are not. Dairy products have more of the large particles. That’s good. A recent meta-analysis of thirteen studies published in December of last year concluded plainly that :

Higher dairy fat exposure is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

7. It was never meant for humans, only baby calves. Personally, I find this to be a weak argument. One could argue that the only milk meant for humans is breast milk. However, many of us, myself included, enjoy soy milk, almond milk, and many of the other non-dairy novelties on a regular basis. The NHANES pubished in 2010 reported that indeed, children aged 2-4 and 5-10 did have higher BMIs when drinking higher quantities of milk (higher BMI was not necessarily equivalent to obesity). However, these results were used for the 2010 dietary guidelines for Americans to encourage milk consumption among children since a higher BMI (not necessarily obese) for a child is not necessarily a bad thing. After all, it is well known that calcium and vitamin D intake are linked to bone health and that milk is an excellent source of these vital nutrients. We also know that bone mass is developed during childhood and adolescence.

One might argue that calcium and vitamin D are also available from the many dairy alternatives such as almond, rice, soy, and coconut milk, and often in higher quantities. In this study, however, they found that our bodies absorb about 25% less of the calcium most brands of soy milk add to their product compared to cow’s milk. In other words, you need to drink about 12 ounces of soy milk to get the same amount of calcium you would get from an 8 ounce glass of cow’s milk. Another review pointed out that we simply don’t know the amount our bodies can absorb from all of the nutrient-fortified plant-based milk options to say whether or not it’s the same as drinking cow’s milk. Either way, no one can deny our children are consuming energy dense, but not necessarily nutrient dense diets and that’s a problem. Cow’s milk is the only product I know of that is consistently high in protein, potassium, calcium, and vitamin D while low in food additives including added sugars that is widely offered to children in their critical growth years.

Hear me out. If you read my blogs, I understand that some of you read holistic health sites as do I. And much of what I’ve said in this post goes against what you’ve probably read or heard. But I do not believe in living in fear, I believe in what it is evidence when it comes to this stuff. I dig as much as my time allows to avoid any potential bias and present the facts to you. If you have any personal experiences that differ and you need to remain committed to a dairy free diet, there are acceptable options to get your calcium from, including some you may haven’t even thought of yet like kale, broccoli, and canned salmon. If you need probiotics and extra supplementation, I have recommendations that I fully trust and use myself that I would feel confident in sharing with you. Feel free me to contact me if you’d like to discuss it more.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here. We have an upcoming fitness challenge that’s going to be lots of fun!

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN