New year, new you – time for a detox?

I’ve been quiet on here this month, enjoying the holidays with my family and frankly, getting slammed with my home business. But 2018 is just around the corner and I know many of you are thinking about your health goals. One of the most popular goals, besides weight loss, is whole body detox. We’re coming off the season where there’s no shortage of sugar, fat, and booze and that leaves many of us feeling a bit bloated and gross.

There are a lot of options out there, though. And if you aren’t careful, you could be wasting your time and money, if not participating in something downright dangerous. So let’s start with some basics if you’re going to do this thing right.

It’s important to remember that is essence, it is our organs that are “detoxing” our bodies and they do it every minute of every day. There is no magical outside substance that will do that for you because your body was already designed to do everything it was meant to sustain your life on the daily. However, our daily habits bring us out of balance often and makes our organs work overtime, leading to disease – such as diabetes, high blood pressure, renal failure, and certain types of cancers, to name a few. We are constantly introducing toxins into our systems forcing our organs to work harder than they should.

A detox should last about thirty days. Anything less is a waste of your precious time and just dumb. You’ll lose some water weight and go right back to old habits the following days or weeks when the detox period is over. It’s also just not long enough to really feel any difference that will create any meaningful habit changes. Why do a detox if you aren’t going to carry some new, beneficial habits with you for months after? It really doesn’t need to go longer than thirty days, either, however. Some habits you bring in over the thirty days would help to keep but not all are totally necessary.

Some foods need to be eliminated in this time period, for obvious reasons, including:

Sugar: I’ve written in past articles why sugar is so very addicting and has been clinically proven so. When you eat sugar, it almost immediately spikes your blood stream levels, causing your pancreas to start working overtime to produce insulin to get that sugar into your body’s cells for energy. But guess what? Sugar is very concentrated in calories and it’s likely you’ve consumed way too much energy than is needed for those cells. The rest is then stored in the liver for later use, which collects as fat and can create a fatty liver if not used. Problem is we habitually over-eat calories and it also collects in our abdomen in the form of fat tissue. This is becoming a pretty big problem in America today, actually. The pancreas eventually putters out trying to keep up, leading to type 2 diabetes. Not a happy subject, but I see this every single day as a dietitian.

Processed carbohydrates: these are converted into sugar when consumed, so same thing as above. It’s not just about avoiding table sugar. Earlier this year, I worked with a group of individuals who took a challenge and avoided these types of foods for thirty days, the results were amazing. They felt more energized, lost weight, and their cravings for sugar diminished. These cravings we experience are caused by dramatic blood sugar fluctuations from eating high sugar foods with low nutritional value. As I mentioned above, they get converted quickly to sugar in your blood stream, but just as quickly your pancreas is working to produce insulin to get it out, which causes a sharp drop in your blood sugar levels. This makes you feel pretty crappy and tired, which means you want more to feel better. It’s a viscous cycle.

Alcohol: most of us understand that this is processed by the liver. Too much of it starts to damage the liver (duh), but during a detox it kinda defeats the purpose if you aren’t abstaining. When we drinking alcohol, our body prioritizes the elimination of it and can’t focus on much of anything else. It’s a good recipe for weight gain, liver cirrhosis (hardening of your liver), and pancreatitis (inflammation.)

Caffeine: this one hurts me. I get it. But caffeine is an extremely addictive stimulant. When consumed in excess, it causes an irritable bowel, disruptive sleep patterns, irregular heart beat, and increased anxiety – all counterproductive to the detoxification process. Believe it or not, it also causes pretty wide fluctuations in your energy levels. If you’ve tried detoxing before and didn’t experience increased energy, it could be because you didn’t give up caffeine. Drinking more water is the most beneficial way to improve energy levels.

Let’s talk about what you do include and why, this is the fun part, right?

  1. Water with lemon. Lots of it. Aim for half of your body weight (pounds) in ounces each day. Water is a natural diuretic and so is lemon. This helps your kidneys out. They need flushing so they don’t get backed up. Your kidneys are probably one of the most important filtering systems in your body and I can’t tell you how many people I see regularly that land themselves in the hospital with temporary failure because they got dehydrated. It’s well over 50% of the people I see every single day. Other problems that happen regularly are fatigue, joint and back pain, headaches, and sweet cravings. I recommend pure lemon essential oil since it comes from the rind rather than the juice and it’s way more concentrated than a squeeze from the fruit. One drop of lemon essential oil is equivalent to the juice of thirty lemons (but not nearly as sour!) It is also known for supporting healthy lungs and digestive system.
  2. Fresh fruits and vegetables. When IS the last time you consumed five (or more) in one day? Be honest. Aim for the rainbow, or at least vary your colors. Plant based foods get their pigments from the nutrients they provide which means if you are eating a variety of colors, you are also getting a variety of nutrients in addition to fiber.
  3. A good multivitamin. This can be tough to find. A couple of years ago, some of the country’s most popular retailers of supplements were busted for selling fake products over the counter. In fact, when tested, only 22% of their supplements actually had any of their claimed product in them at all. Walmart being the worst at only 4% of their products containing what they claimed. Ultimately, they settled in court to keep the attorney general quiet – I’m not too confident that means they grew a conscience about what they are selling, though.
  4. Whole food enzymes. Again, lets help the body out, we’ve been eating low nutritional value foods and now we’re including fresh plant based foods. Unfortunately, today’s food supply is still a bit sub-par in the vitamin/mineral world and even fresh fruits and vegetables are sprouting up from nutrient-depleted soil. Whole food enzymes break down the food and help our bodies utilize the nutrient they provide easier. If you struggle from vague health symptoms like fatigue, joint discomforts, or headaches, it could be because you are lacking certain nutrients that your body has been missing out on.
  5. Probiotics: so many benefits here, I did a blog post a few months ago on how everybody should be taking some. For the purposes of a detox, they aid the digestive and immune systems. We are exposed to environmental toxins regularly, our immune system works overtime, especially during the winter. Let’s help it out, shall we?
  6. Pure essential oils. Essential oils are a fantastic way to support the body’s natural capability of cleansing itself. The organs we are focusing on here are our liver, colon, kidneys, lungs, and skin. Like supplements, the essential oil industry can be tricky so it’s important you know the source you are buying from. But when unadulterated and without synthetic additives, they can prove to be an important part of your detox program. Rosemary, cilantro, and juniper berry essential oils are well known for supporting the liver in it’s normal processes. Geranium and tangerine essential oils are helpful in supporting the body’s systems as a whole as it removes unwanted substances. Think of it as bringing things into balance after weeks (maybe months) of use and abuse with unhealthy foods and habits such as lack of exercise, smoking, environmental threats, and even medication use. My favorite product is a detoxification blend that contains all five of these essential oils that can be taken in a soft-gel form.
  7. Omega 3 fats: great for reducing inflammation, often exacerbated by eating highly processed foods, alcohol, and red meats. Let’s help the body out by adding this in while removing the inflammatory foods, why don’t we? Be sure you are consuming a source rich in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA and DHA) to get the maximum benefit. You could always consume fish three times a week, but remember this is a detox and we are going for the concentrated versions. Ok? I personally choose to take the supplements daily because I never eat fish that often and I’ve experience the benefits well enough I don’t want to stop.

In essence, our bodies have everything we need to survive and cleanse itself out from our lungs to our stomach to our intestines, kidneys, and liver. They all have a job to do filtering out the air we breath, food we eat, liquids we drink, and bacteria we come into contact with. Even so, we can feel out of balance in today’s world as we are consistently pummeled with toxic threats. If you feel like it’s time for a reboot, feel free to contact me for more information about how to schedule supplements, the brands I trust, and meal schedule to follow so you get the most out of your detox.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

 

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Surviving holiday weight gain without driving yourself crazy

Thanksgiving has come and gone with the holidays in full effect now. I’ll admit, I’m one of those people that really love this time of year. There are lots of special things we get to enjoy right now- Christmas music, holiday decorations and lights, winter clothes, and of course seasonal food. I know some of you may be feeling a bit anxious about holiday weight gain though. Especially if you’ve experienced it in previous years past. To give you a better handle on it, I’ve put together some simple tips that I believe will help you out. This year, I want you to think about making it easier for yourself without making it the center of your life. The holidays are about family, friends, gratitude, and should be an exciting time. Frankly, it’s not a great time to go on a new diet. I’m a huge fan of mindlessly losing or maintaining your weight, especially during a time of year when many are mindlessly (and effortlessly!) gaining weight.

  1. How much weight do you normally gain this time of year? Do you actually gain any? According to a study published in 2000 on 195 people in the U.S., the average weight a person actually gains between Thanksgiving and New Years is only about a pound. Although many of us perceive it to be more like five to ten or more. The real problem, however, is that it doesn’t typically come off, whatever you gain. So it just ends up being an additional pound each year compounding on top of the previous year. Now if you know you put on more, say eight to ten pounds….is it realistic to say that this year you are going to actually lose five pounds? What would be different? I’m going to challenge you to think differently and set an unconventional goal that you will gain only a fraction of what you normally gain. For example, if your typical M.O. is to put on ten pounds over the holidays, how about make it a goal this go around to only put on four pounds? If you fall in the average one or two pound weight gainers population, then maybe you can focus on maintaining your weight. Does that make sense? I hope so.
  2. When you are at a holiday party, stand at least slightly more than arms length from the buffet or food table. Ever notice where people like to socialize? People want to stand around the food because it’s where the action is. The problem is you’re going to mindlessly eat for possibly hours if you do that, consuming hundreds of extra calories that you didn’t mean to. This seems like a very simple concept because it is.
  3. Choose wisely on the first trip to the buffet. In a Cornell study, it was found that we tend to serve ourselves the most on that first plate. So, if you know that, choose the lowest calorie foods to put on your plate first. You can always go for a second round to get the richer foods such as dips, cheesy casseroles, and desserts. This way, you are filling up on salads, fruit and veggie platters, and lean proteins while saving yourself up to thousands of calories simply by switching up the order in which you served yourself. Think of it in terms of volume – a creamy pasta dish will have hundreds more calories per cup than a cup of salad with low fat vinaigrette dressing.
  4. Take smaller sips and bites. On a normal everyday basis you may eat like you’re trying to win a race. But at holiday parties, it’s about socializing and enjoying those moments spent with loved ones. I get it, sometimes it’s more stressful than enjoyable during holidays with family. But the foods we eat are also meant to be savored and enjoyed this time of year. They’re special around the holidays, are they not? You will feel more satisfied on less if you choose to eat and drink slower.
  5. Manage your emotions. I would be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge the fact that this time of year can bring up unwelcome emotions such as depression, anxiety, and even anger. If you have a tendency to stress eat this is particularly troublesome for you to manage your weight effectively. I have many past posts addressing this topic that work just as well during the holiday season as they do throughout the year. Remember that if hunger is not the problem, food is not going to solve it. This time of year especially is when we have to be intentional about separating food and our emotions:

Make food about food and emotion about emotion.

Here’s a few quick questions for you though: Why are you sad? Is there someone you can talk to? Are you just stressed because you’ve over-scheduled yourself? Has Christmas shopping overstretched your budget? What things can you address and actually do something about? And what things do you need to let go of?  Most importantly, what are your priorities? I learned a few years ago that when I am clear on my key priorities, it becomes easier to filter my decisions through them. For example, I may be asked to participate in three different “secret santa” gift exchanges, but if one of my key priorities is to manage my budget so that I am able to pay off past debts, the decision to decline the invitations becomes very clear. If I’m asked to volunteer to help with a holiday event but it’s during a time I’ve set aside to spend quality time with my children and they are a key priority for me, the decision to say no is not as difficult and the potential stress of broken promises to anyone is avoided.

Even if you choose just to use one of these, I think it will really change your outcome when you get to January 1. Imagine how it will feel making that resolution and not feeling like you are starting ten steps behind!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

 

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

How do I fit alcohol in during the holidays?

Can you believe it? It’s November and the holidays are just around the corner again. I am confident that many of you will have a plan this year and will stick to that plan well. But have you given any thought to alcohol?

Alcohol does a few things – of course it adds a gazillion calories, often unaccounted for. But more importantly, it lowers your inhibitions. So you know those Christmas cookies you swore you would limit to just one? Yeah, you need some self control to stick to that plan and alcohol is going to lower your ability to do that. Double whammy.

I get it. The holidays are a stressful time for a lot of us. Let’s face it, alcohol may be present at just the right time – that work party you didn’t really want to go to in the first place. Or that family gathering that usually ends up in some sort of nonsense argument that you’d rather not be a part of. Or yet again, you go home after a shopping trip you spent way too much money on and now you’re not sure how the electric bill is gonna get paid. Stress. Alcohol, like food, is a quick fix. But only temporary and ineffective long term.

Here are some tips to keep it real and sane this season:

  1. Incorporate alcohol into your plan if you usually indulge. One or two drinks max and then switch to a calorie free seltzer water. Social drinking can also get the best of us. If you continue to drink in a wine glass, but keep it alcohol free, you may surprise yourself how you really don’t notice. And if you don’t usually drink, well don’t start now!
  2. Be aware of calories. Light beer, non-dessert white wines, and liquor in calorie free or low calorie mixers are the lowest options. Dark beers, dessert wines, and fancy drinks can contain up to 800 calories a pop (mudslides, egg nog and rum, margaritas, etc). Know your serving sizes too. Once drink = 12 ounces beer, 4-6 ounces wine, 1 ounce liquor = 100 calories roughly
  3. Destress in other ways. Start with the source of your stress.
    • Lack of time? Find time weekly to do something fun or enjoyable. This may be off your normal routine since the holidays generally keep us busy. Whatever that is for you, just ten minutes of meditation, a few minutes set aside for daily devotions, reading a book, or getting your nails done can make a huge difference mentally.
    • Lack money? Trying a secret santa gift exchange among your extended family, cutting down on the amount of presents you normally buy your friends/family, and simply following a gift budget can all help. Try shopping ahead of time to space it out. It’s only early November and if we’d all start our gift shopping now, it would cut down on a lot of financial stress and keep us from battling the crowds later on. As Dave Ramsey says, Christmas is the same day every year, yet we all act like it’s a surprise emergency!
    • Exercise. We all know this helps with stress yet this will be the first to go when time is slim. Make it a priority this year to walk even if only 20-30 minutes a day. It will help you sleep better and handle any unknowns that come your way better. If you normally do your exercise in the evening, you may have to switch it up and do it in the morning during the holidays with a busier schedule. If you normally take the weekends off, you may need to go ahead and walk on the weekends to make up for missed time on the weekdays. Bottom line, be flexible when your schedule calls for it.
    • In the moment, try aromatherapy. When we are stuck in traffic or at the family dinner and a fight breaks out, it’s tempting to handle stress poorly. But don’t underestimate the power of aromatherapy from essential oils. Personal favorites include wild orange, lavender, and grounding blend. A drop or two can be worn on a diffuser necklace or rubbed between the palms of your hands and inhaled for a quick shot to the limbic brain – the center that controls our emotions.

Let me know what your strategy is going to be this holiday season. Do you have something to add or do you plan do use one of these tips?

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

My recovery from procrastination and perfectionism

Here we are again. Looking at the same weights I’ve owned for probably fifteen years. Back to the lowest numbers. Again. Another epiphany that I need to pick them up and use them to feel better, look better, have more energy, and everything in between.

Why do we do this to ourselves? I own everything from three pounds to ten pounds and then all of the resistance bands too. I work up to lifting and pulling the hardest strengths until something happens and I get out of the routine. For months. Years even.

This time it was a doctor’s appointment. I’ve had chronic pain issues since my first born was a year old. It stems from migraines, which I’ve had since my earliest memories, but the term “chronic” came into play seven years ago. Before then, I was pretty active – running half marathons, participating in power yoga several days a week, and pretty committed to cardiovascular exercise on a daily basis. We all know how it is though, life gets busy after kids, work, and compounding responsibilities and then there is no more time to fit in self care. Until you have no choice.

That’s where I’m at. I’m sure many of you are in the same boat. You need to do something, but you’re not sure where to start because the only time you remember feeling your best was when you actually had the time and energy to do the things you know you should be doing. Problem is, you have neither now. Life is different and you don’t know where to start.

If you are like me then you probably have a tendency to push yourself until you just can’t anymore. You have multiple responsibilities and if something is going to go, it’s probably exercising and eating healthy. Until you’re crashing and sitting in a doctor’s office or your bed wondering how you ended up that way. You’ve heard the airplane analogy, so you know you’re supposed to put your oxygen mask on first, but you haven’t. Until you’re forced to. Read on. This is for you.

Here are a few strategies I’ve learned along the way that I believe will help you (like they do for me, when I implement them):

  1. The days of perfection are over. Did you know procrastination is the most common form of perfectionism? We hold off until “just the right time” to get started until we are pushed with our backs against the wall. And then we use the excuse” if i had more time, I would of had better results.” Ironic, huh? Remember this, moving forward in imperfection is ALWAYS better than not moving forward at all.
  2. Decide the goals you are working towards and write them down. With pen and paper. It’s a psychological thing when we do this that scientifically makes it more likely we will follow through with our goals (even more so than typing them.) And include realistic deadlines to avoid procrastination. Be sure to break your larger goals down to smaller, more manageable ones.
  3. Plan ahead in a realistic manner. Go ahead and pick out the days you plan to exercise. What meals you’re going to have. Grocery shop for the week. And then realize it may all go down the tubes anyway. Refer to #1. You may have decided to wake up thirty minutes early every morning to get in some exercise, but there will be days that you oversleep the alarm clock anyway. So what? You can always settle for a fifteen minute walk on your lunch break at work instead. Something is better than nothing.
  4. Go tell someone. I know that being accountable is no fun. It means you’re being really real about it this time. Pick someone that will actually hold you accountable though. Not just someone that will be a cheerleader and pat you on the back when you had a bad day. We all need that, but even more so, we need someone that isn’t afraid to call us out when we aren’t doing what we said we’d do. Your word is your integrity.
  5. Avoid catastrophizing. This is perhaps the biggest tip that has helped me over the years. It means you are using your energy productively rather than by viewing things worse than they actually are. Believe me, I know when situations look dire that it’s tempting to set giant goals that you know would turn your life completely around for the better. Unfortunately that usually leads to failure or procrastination and ultimately, more defeat. If you want to lose 100 pounds, break it down into ten pound increments. If you want to be fit enough to run a half marathon, pick one scheduled six months or more from now and get to training, one mile at a time.

We are nearly eight weeks away from the holidays. What is it that you’ve been procrastinating on? Let me know in the comments!

P.S. If you are up to beginning this journey with me starting Monday, October 2, head over here for the details and how to join my support group where we will be having weekly live chats and goal setting sessions.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

5 Excuses why we don’t exercise (and how to bust through them)

We all have that one friend who loves to exercise. They swear by it and if they miss a day, everyone knows about it because they claim to feel terrible. You wanna be like them. Well maybe not just like them, but you want to at least want to exercise.But as of this post, you can’t remember the last time you actually did exercise. I’m gonna help you out and just lay all of the most common excuses for why exercise is so easy to justify not doing and then tell you why they are totally false. Sound good? If you read on, you may no longer use these excuses. Fair warning.

Excuse #1: I don’t have enough time. Well join the club. I’m gonna give you a little eye-opener though – think of the last really good book you read. Like, Hunger Games/Fifty Shades Trilogy good (whatever you thing is). How long did it take you to read all 3 books? Be honest. How did you make the time? Stay up all night? Make the kids cook their own dinner? Skip a tv show or two? Here’s the deal- we make time for what we want. It comes down to priorities. I’m not telling you to stop scrolling on Facebook (although we all could probably benefit from less time spent there), but I am telling you to evaluate how you spend your time if this is the excuse you hold near and dear.

Tips to bust through it: Wear a pedometer. I highly recommend the Omron HJ325. It doesn’t cost much and is one of the more accurate step counters I have used it for years. Could be a FitBit if you want to get more fancy and track your heart rate, sleep quality, and time. Exercise is great, but it’s more about being physically active throughout the day. I talk about step goals here. Break it up if you are really that strapped for time. Say, two to three fifteen walk breaks daily instead of one 45 minute walk around the neighborhood. Most of us can find an extra ten or fifteen minutes here and there throughout our day where we are wasting time and could be walking. Step counters make you more aware of how you can fit in “accidental” activity as well (i.e. stairs, parking farther away, walking allll the way over to your colleague’s cubicle instead of sending an email, etc). If you need to sneak in resistance training, keep a set of hand weights by your couch to do while watching television, bring resistance bands to work and learn exercises that are easy to do between phone calls. Multitask!

Excuse #2: I’m exhausted. I get it. I have two kids, church commitments, a part-time job, and I own a business. My day usually starts at 5:30 a.m. and ends around 10:30 p.m. I’m sure you have lots of your own stuff that wears you out. Thing is, being exhausted is often a symptom of physical inactivity. Ouch. Energetic people are in motion.

Tips to bust through it: If you need to get up and go first thing when you wake up, before you have time to talk yourself out of it, then put your shoes by the door and clothes by the bathroom sink where you go to brush your teeth. Make it a habit. When I used to work full time, I would bring my clothes with me to work and go for a long walk or run in the neighborhood behind our building before I got in the car to go home. I knew myself and once I got in the door, not only would the day catch up, but the evening responsibilities would swallow me up too. Other days I would take two or three short walk breaks to total 20-30 minutes a day just to stay awake! Working at a desk job with no windows will zap your energy alone.

Excuse #3: I hurt too much. This is possibly one of the more difficult challenges to bust through. Little known fact: I’m a chronic pain sufferer myself. So again, I get it. Here’s what I know about chronic pain – the more you sit around and think about it, the worse it gets. The less you move, the worse it gets. If you have pain, it is MORE of a reason to move, NOT less. If you’re complaining because of common post exercise muscle soreness, well that’s supposed to happen and it’s a good thing. If you work muscles that aren’t used to moving, they’re naturally gonna revolt on you. Over time, this won’t happen so much as you get stronger. To some degree, you always want to feel some soreness as a sign that you are challenging yourself a bit, but not to a point that it’s painful.

Tips to bust through it: Modify. Not everyone was meant to run cross country or train for triathlons. That’s okay. In fact, one of the best exercises you can do is walk. If you are going for general health, thirty minutes most days is the goal. If you are aiming to lose and maintain weight loss, you’ll need to go for 45-60 minutes most days. If you have an injury that keeps you from walking that much, try bicycling, swimming, or even seeing a physical therapist if you need to. Point is, you can always find something that will work for you if you seek and ask for help. In the long run, you may even experience less pain. Win-win!

Excuse #4: I really don’t like to exercise. This is my favorite! Saying this is like saying “I don’t like food, so I won’t eat.” There are just way too many choices to say that kind of statement. What you are really saying is “I don’t have any reason not to exercise, I just don’t want to.” Sorry, this just isn’t an excuse.

Tips to bust through it: Be willing to try new things. Walking sound boring? Get a partner to pass the time. Try group classes. Change it up and alternate activities. If you like sports, remember that counts as activity, so find a local team that meets for fun. Is the gym intimidating? Go during off hours when not many people are there. You could always skip the gym altogether and stay home and do videos on YouTube, purchase exercise DVDs, or walk outdoors. There are just too many options to try to say you don’t like any of it.

Excuse #5: It’s too hot, too cold, raining, snowing outside. It’s always one of these things outside. Where I live, we get about two weeks of Fall weather (so, when it’s none of those things), another two weeks of semi-cold, and the other 48 weeks are hot and/or raining. So this excuse can be made a lot.

Tips to bust through it: Go early before the elements kick in. Go later in the evening after the sun has gone down. When it’s colder, go mid-day when the sun is at peak. If it’s raining or during the summer when temperatures reach heat-stroke warning highs, be flexible and go indoors. I’ve given you lots of options already of what to do inside. Some gyms offer month to month memberships. If you live by a mall, most of them open early enough before the shops so that you can go walking inside. Don’t worry about looking silly, everyone else is in there doing the same thing!

This just about covers the main excuses for why people don’t exercise. I’ve used them all. You’ve probably used some, too. In addition to the tips I’ve given you to bust through them, I’ve also been able to lessen my pain and increase my energy by using the right vitamins and nutritional supplements. So many of us walk around with vague symptoms like fatigue, achy joints, and daily headaches and don’t realized it can be linked to a simple nutrient deficiency. Our food supply and many of the vitamins on the market today are stripped of the vital nutrients our bodies need to feel our best. If you’d like to know more about the brand I use and trust, feel free to contact me.

So tell me, are you ready to bust through these excuses? If you are, you may want some accountability. I’m beginning a 30 day Fitness Challenge on Monday, July 17, to take us through the rest of summer. If you want in, click here to join and for directions to get in.

P.S. If you’ve been looking for support, you’ve come to the right place, request to join my online support group for all things nutrition and weight loss support.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Could you go 30 days without sugar?

We just finished a 30 day no sugar challenge in my online community. The results were pretty amazing. Weight loss plateaus were broken, shopping habits were changed, and more importantly, carbohydrates were no longer demonized.

What do I mean by this?

In the beginning, there was some confusion about what was okay and what was not. The challenge was meant to be a simple one – no added sugars of any kind (including honey, table sugar – white, brown, etc, agave, maple syrup) and no refined or processed carbohydrates. The first one was pretty easy to grasp. The second category was more difficult because, in the dieting world, we become conditioned to categorizing foods into two groups: carbohydrates (bad) and everything else (good).

It was a fun learning process. This was the list of disallowed foods in addition to added sugars: 
-chips/french fries (anything that’s made from a potato but isn’t an actual potato)
-pretzels
-cookies/brownies
-sweetened coffee creamer
-candy
-crackers
-cake/snack cakes/snack bars
-white pasta (whole grain is fine, couscous which is a tiny form of pasta is also good, quinoa also good)
-white breads and buns (whole grains are fine)
-white bagels and english muffins
-white waffles (there are very few whole grain waffle varieties available)

-white rice (again, whole grain/wild is good)-most cereals (oats/oatmeal and whole grain cereals like oat bran are fine)-ice cream/sherbet/popsicles (try frozen fruit)

The learning process began when we found snack items, like granola bars and cereal, that listed the initial ingredient as “whole grain” and other ingredients that were natural and whole. They were allowed. It was also okay to eat white potatoes and corn – because, HELLO! These are real food! Nothing processed there!

I know what you may be thinking, why no honey? Because that’s what everyone else was thinking, too. It’s got beneficial health properties so why wasn’t it included? But as my friend and fellow challenger said, “we are trying to get rid of the sugar monster!” And when consumed, honey is still converted into sugar, still tastes sweet, and still activates that addiction that is sparked in most of us to keep eating more. That was the whole point of this challenge. To stop the powerful addiction that is sugar. I talk about this more in a previous post – if you ever wondered if it’s a real thing, it is.

 The other thing you may have noticed is that this was the only thing that was changed for the entire 30 days and RESULTS HAPPENED.  I did that on purpose. Oftentimes, it seems like there are more decisions that need to happen to make a real difference. Why didn’t the challenge include choosing more lean means, cutting out fried foods, or eating more fruits and veggies? While all of that stuff is important to a healthy diet, I don’t think as many would have stuck it out if they had to change it all in the 30 days.

 Pick one thing to change and surprise yourself at how consistent you are and what kind of results you get because of it.

For their specific results and testimonies, head over here and check it out!

P.S. The challenge in our group is over. But that doesn’t mean you can’t give it a go. We’d love to have and support you if you’re game! Go ahead and join my free online support group here.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

How to end weight cycling (and beat that plateau!)

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably experienced yo yo dieting, or more technically referred to as “weight cycling.” Simply put, dieting to successfully lose a significant amount of weight in a fairly short amount of time followed by weight regain and often additional pounds.

Have you ever wondered just how many times you can repeat this process before your body has had enough? Or if it’s even a healthy thing to do? Sure, you know that extra weight isn’t a good thing, but you also know that regaining large amounts of weight isn’t, either. And why bother going on a diet if you know the end result will be a number on the scale much higher than when you started? But what other choice do you have?

Eventually there will be a quitting point for your body. You’ve probably already noticed with each dieting attempt it’s becoming more difficult to lose weight – you don’t lose as much or lose it as fast. And no, regaining large amounts of extra weight is not very good for your body at all, it increases your fat to lean tissue ratio and in recent studies, it’s tough on your cardiovascular system, too.

When you lose weight, it’s inevitable that you will lose some of your muscles mass. This equates to a slower metabolism in the long run since fat burns a lot less calories at rest than muscle does (and as a wild guess here, I’m assuming you aren’t hitting the gym when you’ve stopped following your diet, so your muscle gets replaced with fat when you start regaining the weight.) So in this case, it would have been better for you to have never tried losing weight in the first place.

The fact is, statistically 90% of dieters who lose weight WITHOUT bariatric surgery will regain their weight loss within the following year. Discouraging, I know. But some of this starts with having realistic weight loss expectations to begin with. So let’s start there.

A realistic rate of weight loss is, on average, 1/2 to 2 pounds per week. If you weigh closer to 300 pounds or more, than it’s 1% of your body weight weekly (so 3 pounds a week, 4 for 400 pounds, etc.) And most will begin to see a weight loss plateau around a 5-10% weight loss. What does this mean? It means you will begin to see a dramatic slowing in weight loss results or even a complete halt sometime between there. Those who have more to lose (if you are over 300 pounds to start with) may not see this plateau until you’ve lost closer to 20% of your initial weight. But rest assured, it’s coming.

What do you do when that happens? Realize that your efforts to lose weight worked and that your body is responding in the way that it should.  And then accept that you may only see the scale drop by a pound or so per month for a while instead of per week like you are used to. Unfortunately, this is when most people begin to get frustrated and feel like what they are doing is no longer working and so they throw in the towel. That’s a dangerous place to be because you are at high risk to regain the weight to begin with. Your body is in a bit of a metabolic mess and very prone to weight gain because it has not had time to adjust to the new, lower weight you. Throwing in the towel on healthy eating habits and exercise is the worst thing you can do. Instead, do these four things and you will end the yo yo cycle while continuing to see results:

1. Consider lowering your carbohydrate intake to 130 grams per day if you are not already following a low carb diet.

2. Be sure you are consuming plenty of protein at all of your meals – 30 grams is the magic number for most.

3. Exercise a minimum of 45 minutes daily. This is the absolute minimum requirement as recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine for prevention of weight regain. (Don’t shoot the messenger!)

4. Be sure you are drinking a minimum of 8-10 cups of water per day.

Lastly, if you are doing the above things and you can’t get out of it, try keeping track of your food intake for a few days using an online record keeping system like sparkpeople or myfitnesspal (both free and easy to use) to get an objective take on what you are consuming. I once worked with a woman who swore up and down she was only consuming 1200 calories per day. When she finally decided to track it, she was mortified to find out she was actually consuming 2400 per day. That’s twice as much!

You can also consider a weight loss aid, such as an appetite suppressant. I talk about your options in a previous post here, available through your doctor and natural options that you can contact me about if interested in learning more.

Once you understand that this is a lifelong effort, you will begin to understand that there is no such thing as going “on” a diet (because that means eventually you are going “off” a diet) but rather, changing your lifestyle.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle and lose weight, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Why you need to do more than just go to the gym

Have you ever gotten on a gym kick and decided you were gettin’ that membership, signing up for that personal trainer, and committing to going daily? And then after a week or two got on the scale expecting to see the pounds just melt off? I mean, you’ve been working your tail off and you can barely open a pickle jar these days because your arms hurt so bad. It’s only fair that the scale should be at least ten pounds down. At least.

But that’s not what happens. In fact, you gained weight.

Your personal trainer tells you some line about muscle gains. But deep down you know it’s unlikely. You hurt but not enough to justify two pounds of muscle in seven days for God’s sake. So why did this happen?

Here are some possible reasons:

  1. You didn’t change your diet to coincide with this newfound lease on exercise. And more often than not, people increase their caloric intake because naturally, you feel hungrier with the extra calorie burn and you eat to match that hunger. Or, feelings of “earning” that extra slice of pizza creep in- I mean seriously, your personal trainer was pretty hard on you today.
  2. You did change your diet, but you’ve cut your calories way too low and now your body has gone into starvation mode (i.e. storage factory for calories because you’re burning them and cutting them and your metabolism doesn’t know what to do with that.) Side note: this is usually not the case, but it’s worth mentioning for anyone who has cut their calories <1000. Our bodies are better at protection from famine than we given it credit for.
  3. You’ve increased your carb intake either with protein shakes from the gym’s ultra fancy smoothie bar or any extra post-work out snack full of carbs and now your body is storing it all with water because that’s what carbs cozy up with and leave you feeling bloated.
  4. The most likely cause: you’ve given yourself permission to sit on the couch for the rest of the day and you aren’t living a physically active lifestyle. Did you know people who live a physically active lifestyle are actually healthier than those who just go to the gym and do nothing else? Were gyms even a “thing” for non-athletes twenty or thirty years ago?

So let’s talk about getting physically active. Because prior to the computer age, desk jobs weren’t so common. But now that we are spending most of our lives sitting down, at a computer, we have to be more aware of what many health professionals call “the sitting disease.” If you are spending seven hours or more sitting (watching television, reading a book/newspaper, playing/working on your phone or tablet, or at your computer), you are at risk. Recent studies have suggested that is is just as bad for our health as smoking. Smoking!!

Let’s be clear – being physically active is not the same as exercise. And this can be good news for those of us that don’t particularly care for planned exercise. A study done at Mayo Clinic compared something they called non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) between self proclaimed “couch potatoes”  and people who were more physically active. NEAT includes activities like laughing, fidgeting, standing, walking, and talking. Both sets of groups wore underwear that measured their every move, day and night.

What they found was that the people who were able to turn on their NEAT did NOT gain fat when they were overfed by 1000 calories daily. People who didn’t turn on their NEAT gained TEN TIMES more fat. Can you believe that??

So how can you apply this to your life?

I suggest getting yourself a good pedometer so that you can track your daily steps. I really like the Omron HJ325. You will quickly find that you probably walk less than 3000 steps per day and that’s not good. It’s easier than you think to increase this though. Just ten minutes at a time is enough to count as a walking activity. So, plan for three, ten minute walks a day and you are doing the same thing as if you decided to do a thirty minute walk all at once. But, you are more likely to stay consistent with this routine.

Why? Because let’s say you always walk for thirty minutes after work. Inevitably something is going to happen after work every so often – you get a flat tire, the kids have a ball game, you’re too tired, you get caught at work late, etc. However, if you split it up, you still at least got twenty minutes in and you’re only out those ten minutes after work. Make sense? So commit to splitting it up. The other benefit of this is, most of us won’t have to get on any special work out clothes or take a shower after a ten minute walk.

So how many steps are enough? Your first goal will be to work your way up to 5000 to get out of the sedentary zone. Then, keeping in mind if you have been a total couch potato, work yourself up without beating yourself up using the below chart. Another way to look at is, if the amount of steps you are walking is meeting your weight goals (i.e. you are maintaining or losing), then it’s enough. If it’s not (so, you’re gaining weight), well then you need to add steps or cut back on your calorie intake.

Also, think of your typical day now. Are there times when you could be standing rather than sitting? For example, could you move that piece of exercise equipment that is holding up your clothes to a place in front of your tv? Could you stand while taking phone calls at work instead of sitting? Can you take the stairs rather than an elevator? Park a little further away? This stuff adds up.

Whether you like going to the gym or not, it’s important to remember that it’s about our lifestyle as a whole when it comes to weight loss and weight maintenance. Set some daily goals starting now and you’ll be surprised how far you can go over the next six months.

P.S. If you’ve been looking for support, you’ve come to the right place, request to join my online support group for all things nutrition and weight loss support.

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email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

Atkins vs. Weight Watchers

Continuing my series on popular diet reviews this week. As requested, I’m taking a look at the Atkins diet and Weight Watchers.

Atkins: in the  most updated versions, there are two plans, Atkins 20® and Atkins 40®, meaning you are allowed to consume 20 grams net or 40 grams net carbohydrates per day, preferably coming from vegetables only. What’s a net carbohydrate? Total carbohydrates minus the fiber content in a food since fiber is nondigestable (fun fact = if you go to Canada, these carbs are already subtracted for you on food labels.) Most of us have tried or known someone who has tried this one, and succeeded. Pretty basic to follow, consume no carbohydrates exceeding the daily limit including fruits, breads, pasta, rice, potatoes, sugary snacks, cereal, candy, etc. Basis is you will force your body to go into ketosis, which means it will begin to burn stored fat for energy rather than it’s preferred source, dietary carbohydrate. This equals rapid weight loss.

Pros: you get quick results. It’s also fairly easy to follow, which is pretty attractive – no real planning, counting, or real thought process like many other diets out there. And, in spite of what you may have heard, if you go to their website, they actually do have a maintenance plan which does involve adding carbohydrates back into your diet. Unfortunately, I’ve never met anyone that has done this in a planned way, however.

Cons: while not particularly harmful long term, ketosis can be rough. Many people have a real difficult time with the lethargy, headaches, dizzy spells, and possible stomach upset (nausea, diarrhea, and/or constipation) that occurs when they first take out fiber and other important nutrients that only carb-containing foods can provide. This is why I don’t recommend any diet that advises less than 100 grams total carbohydrate per day – and that is still LOW. The majority of Americans consume upwards of 300+ grams daily. If you drop down to 100, I promise you’ll see results. And here is the biggest con of all with the Atkins diet: I have worked with hundreds of patients and clients in weight loss for the past eleven years. The Atkins diet is almost always on their list of tried (and result-producing) past diets. I have NEVER, not ONCE, met someone who has not regained it all back (and often more) once they stopped the diet. Never. In my book, the end results of this diet is an additional ten or more pounds. Don’t do it.

For more information on their program, visit www.atkins.com. Who knows, if you give their maintenance plan a chance, maybe it might work?

Weight Watchers: this one is probably equally as popular in past diet attempts that I’ve heard from well-meaning dieters. They’ve changed it up over the years, which I believe is an improvement. Rather than counting calories, you use a system they call SmartPoints®, which are based on calories, saturated fat, sugar and protein. You get a “budget” to work with throughout your day and if you want to maximize that, you will need to earn “FitPoints ®” by increasing your daily physical activity.

Pro: I’ve always been a fan of this program if someone really needs accountability and guidance. Overall, they encourage consuming healthy foods but allow some flexibility. If you consume a high point food, well, you will quickly see the “cost.” And I really like the weekly meeting concept and view it as the biggest benefit they offer, although not everyone utilizes it. If you aren’t into the group thing, you can get a personal coach instead. With today’s growing technology and fast-paced lifestyle, they have grown with the times and offer online support systems now, too, all at very reasonable costs.

Cons: when you reach your goal weight, you earn a free lifetime membership – this means no registration fees ever again and free access to all of their digital tools and weekly meetings. Really great way to help people maintain their success. However, here’s the rub: as a lifetime member, you must weigh-in at a weekly meeting once a month, every month. Fair enough. BUT, if you gain as much as three pounds, you get charged a weekly fee for the next month until you can bring it back down within a two pound range. So, if you gained some water weight, got constipated, went out to eat and ate a salty meal the night before, well, your wallet is going to pay for it. While I agree with the concept, I don’t agree with the two pound window – it’s not based on normal weight fluctuations. But hey, they are a business and if everyone is considered a success, they don’t make their money. (If you want to read why I feel this way, head over to my previous post here.)

For more information on their options, visit. www.weightwatchers.com

So there ya have it. Two more diets for you. If you are totally in love with either of these diets, I’m only offering my insight and opinions with some facts mixed in. If you would like to learn more about a specific diet, let me know in the comments section.

P.S. If you’d like more information on the diet that I do recommend and how I’ve helped others lose 30-80lbs following simple steps, contact me here.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

 

Ketogenic and the Whole 30 Diets – Yay or Nay?

I’ve recently started a series on some of the more popular diets right now to hopefully take the guess work out of whether or not you should consider them. For this week, I’m gonna focus on the Ketogenic diet and the Whole 30 diet.

Ketogenic diet: a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet – usually three to four grams of fat per gram of carbohydrate and protein combined coming from heavy whipping cream, butter, mayonnaise, and oils. Why it is used: it helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy and should be prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. This is not just a low carb diet like the Atkins.  It is supposed to produce ketones in the body (hence the name), which are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Normally our body uses carbohydrate as its primary energy source. In normal circumstances, the bare minimum I ever recommend is 100 to 130 grams of carbohydrate. This diet includes minimum carbs, often under ten grams per day, to force the body to use fat for energy.

Pros: in those with intractable seizures meaning, non responsive to medications, it can greatly reduce their frequency and severity of seizures. It can cause rapid weight loss, but a ketogenic diet in the true sense is going to do anything but. Also, prolonged ketosis is not a natural state that the human body functions well in (which I will explain below in the “cons” section.) Having said that, it can be life saving and changing for those merely surviving one seizure to the next.

Cons: since the body is designed to use carbohydrates for energy, expect to feel pretty sluggish. Our primary food sources of carbohydrate include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and dairy. So you can expect constipation as well. If you aren’t constipated, you may have diarrhea due to the high fat content or, if you’re really lucky, alternating. Other issues related to a high fat diet include reflux, nausea, vomitting, and kidney stones. In addition, it’s not very nutritionally balanced and even mineral absorption issues can occur causing hair loss, weakened bones, muscle cramps, acute pancreatitis, impaired focus and memory (the brain needs sugar), high cholesterol, increased inflammation, depressed mood, and even menstrual irregularities. Sounds fun, right?

Whole 30 diet: this diet claims that food, primarily grains, sugar, alcohol, and legumes, are the root of all your health ailments. I see this one daily in the health circles I run in. Most people that follow this are doing so because they want to feel better. Nothing wrong with that. It’s temporary and the closest thing I can compare it to is an elimination diet I put people on who are allergic to multiple foods and they aren’t sure which one(s) are the culprit. The theory is after thirty-one days, you will know right away which food is the cause of your health problems because you feel terrible once you reintroduce it back into your diet. While I agree we could all go without sugar and alcohol and be better off for it, I have never met a person who has allergies, irritable bowel syndrome, or chronic knee pain because they eat mini wheats for breakfast and legumes at dinner time. Sorry, but I’ve been a dietitian for a while now and I’ve never seen nor read any validated research backing this up. Having said that, I’m all for a diet that advocates eating more fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and advocates cooking more and eating less processed food.

Pros: it’s an overall very healthy diet that eliminates sugar and refined, processed food – all of which we eat too much of. It’s also high in fiber and protein, two things I’m a big fan of in any diet.

Cons: while I love the idea of getting people to cook more and eat more whole foods, zero eating out and zero convenience food options is going to make this difficult for many in our fast paced society. This diet is only for the motivated individual who can really dedicate themselves to focusing on their food for the month. I’m not really excited about the idea that it’s a temporary diet – going on a diet just means you plan to go off a diet. But hey, if you truly feel better, it could be the beginning of something great, right?

So there ya have it. Two more diets for you. If you are totally in love with either of these diets, I’m only offering my insight and opinions. None of this is meant to hurt feelings of any die hard fans. If you would like to learn more about a specific diet, let me know in the comments section.

Also, if you’d like more information on the diet that I do recommend and how I’ve helped others lose 30-80lbs following simple steps, contact me here.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN