4 ways to conquer binge eating

Many people struggle with this and it ruins the best of intentions to lose weight or even just maintain your weight. You could be going along happily in your life and then boom, it hits. You know, that hard to ignore urge to binge until you’ve overdone it that ultimately ends in regret, guilt, and food restriction and/or self punishment. What if you could stop yourself before it even happens? It’s possible.

But first, let’s define what a binge truly is. Technically it’s when you are eating something that elicits the feeling of loss of control until you’ve eaten more than is a desired reasonable amount. The quantity and food varies from person to person. Person A could define a personal binge as eating 3 doughnuts while person B could define their personal binge as not until they’ve consumed the whole dozen of doughnuts. Person A could define a personal binge as consuming two servings of potato chips while person B could define their binge as eating the entire family size bag. Make sense? We all have different thresholds in this. No judgement for any quantity, it’s more about when you feel like you’ve lost your sense of self control that leads to feelings of guilt and self punishment. That’s no good for anyone.

So let’s talk about some ways to combat it:

  1. Know your triggers. Understand what sets you off in the first place and then avoid it or prepare for it when necessary. Does going to a party trigger you to binge on the chip bowl? Plan ahead of time and know that you simply can’t hang out around the food table. Does having a giant tub of ice cream in your freezer trigger you to indulge in the entire thing as soon as you’re home alone? Don’t buy it! Does having an argument with your spouse trigger you to run to the pantry and dive into the chocolate chip cookies? Put a post-it note on your pantry door that reminds you to stop and take a few deep breathes before you’re so quick to start eating when food is not what you really need at that moment.
    • Understand this, every habit we have is part of a chain that has multiple links. Each link is attached to the next that produces a result. The key is for you to break the link that results in a binge. It only takes one alteration, like a post-it note, to put a kink in that chain and direct you to a different activity.
  2. Exercise regularly. When we exercise on a regular basis, it keeps a steady stream of endorphins going in our system and helps keep our mood stabilized. It also helps us sleep better and thus, make better decisions throughout the day. Ever been sleep deprived for a few days? Remember how emotional and irrational you were? This is a high risk time for binging. In general, those who exercise just feel better about their health and body and have an easier time maintaining their weight overall.
  3. Start the day with a healthy breakfast. If you are going to skip any meal of the day, don’t let it be this one! Really work hard to eat within 2 hours of waking up and strive for 25-30 grams of protein at that meal. This helps stabilize blood sugars, control hunger later in the day, and thus keeps your mood more even making it less likely for a binge later on. Also, usually when we start our day off healthy, we are more likely to keep it going than when we started our day off not so great (say, with a sugary, high calorie breakfast).
  4. Avoid going more than 3-5 hours without eating. This one just makes sense. If you let yourself get too hungry and the setting is right, a binge is inevitable. Plan for high protein snacks such as cheese sticks, yogurt, deli meat, nuts or high fiber foods such as fresh fruits and veggies to fill in the gaps when meals are spread far apart. Find some other options here.

Lastly, this will be a work in progress for you if you have struggled with binge eating for a long time. The tips I’ve given you will help the person who struggles with occasional episodes of binge eating that they relate to either unhealthy emotions or certain situations that act as triggers for them. I am not referring to someone who has a recognized binge eating disorder which is characterized by behaviors far beyond what is described in this blog post. If you find yourself preplanning binge episodes, eating large quantities of food (in the multiple thousand calorie range) in very short periods of time, purposely eating alone out of embarrassment over the quantity of food eaten, and feelings of “zoning out” and even forgetting what food was consumed during these episodes, you may have an eating disorder and I encourage you to seek professional help from a licensed counselor.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Why it’s not risky to have weight loss surgery

Although I have never personally been overweight, I am an advocate for those who are. It’s not because I watched a family member struggle or have some heart wrenching personal story to share with you. Circumstances ten years ago just lead me to a position working with people who do struggle with weight.

Through that time, I have gotten to know hundreds, if not thousands, of individuals and their personal stories, and why there is so much more to weight loss than “eat less, exercise more.” I’ve helped a lot of people make the scary decision to pursue weight loss surgery, get their habits (and their mind) right on the way there, and I’ve been there that amazing day when they became a literal new person. So much so, I couldn’t even recognize them standing right next to me as I called them into my office for that two month post surgery check up.

I’ve cried with clients, done happy dances with them when the scale hit a certain number, and held the trash can when they needed to vomit because they ate something they shouldn’t have (yea, sucks to do that in your dietitian’s office.) I’ve been the first person to weigh someone after years and years of avoiding the scale. I’ve been the last person to see someone drink a soda before they chucked it in the trash can for good (carbonation isn’t allowed after weight loss surgery if you were wondering.) I’ve also been the first person to find out they’re going for it, for realz. It’s scary, it’s exciting, it’s terrifying, and it’s truly life changing.

Here’s the deal though, I don’t want to hear that “bariatric surgery is high risk” from people who know nothing about it other than that their brother’s coworker’s aunt’s mother in law had that “stomach stapling” procedure back in the 80s and died. Don’t ever take the excitement away from someone by telling them it’s too risky. 

I do get it. I’ve worked with two or three people out of hundreds that had the surgery and it went terribly wrong. They can’t eat food anymore because they had a rare complication. They get to live on a feeding tube for the rest of their life. I’ve gotten to know a couple of individuals who died months later because their health problems before surgery were against them and weight loss surgery didn’t fix it. It sucked. But they were exceptions, more on this later.

But I’ve also seen people get out of wheelchairs, off their diabetes medications, go on vacations again, and live life out of the house again because of this surgery. And that “stomach stapling” or “risky gastro procedure” everyone is so scared of, was actually life saving to someone that used to spend their entire life dieting without success, counting pills, administering injections, and going to doctor visits because their body became a prison.

If you think it’s about eating less and exercising more, think again. Obesity is not a lifestyle choice. If it was, there would be zero obese people in this world trying to lose weight. Everyone would wake up, cherry pick their dream weight and get to it. But if you’re reading this, you probably know that’s not true.

Here are 5 well meaning reasons why I’ve heard weight loss surgery is an unsafe choice and why they are false. If it’s something you’ve been considering but have been convinced it’s a “last ditch effort,” I want to give you some peace of mind to make a rationale choice. I’m not here to tell you to go do it, but I don’t want you to not go do it out of fear, either.

  1. You could die. Obesity itself is the number 2 cause of preventable death (aside from smoking) in the United States today. In this analysis of 13,871 morbidly obese patients from a national registry between January 1996 and January 2006, the risk of death within 60 days following any weight loss procedure was 0.25%, making it a rare event. A main reason for this is because modern day procedures are typically done laparoscopically, meaning only 5 small incisions about one inch in length each are made to perform the procedure rather than a long vertical incision as used to be made. Medicine is always evolving!
  2. It’s a cop out. And you could die. Okay, this is kind of a continuation of the first, but I felt needed more clarification. Bariatric surgery is emerging as a powerful weapon against severe obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Numerous studies confirm that weight loss surgery, particularly Roux en y gastric bypass surgery is more effective at bringing those with T2DM into disease remission than those who were undergoing conventional medical therapy. Some studies that back this up include this one, this one, this one, and this one. But there are several more available in case you need more proof. As a reminder, complications of long term, uncontrolled diabetes include: kidney failure, often requiring dialysis, neuropathy leading to toe and/or foot amputations, and heart disease. Not one of these are known complications of weight loss surgery.
  3. You’re going to throw up a lot. Well, yes, if you don’t follow strict dietary guidelines. I get it, this is not a lifestyle for everyone. It requires consuming adequate amounts of nutrition, 5-6 times/day, when you’re barely hungry. It also means you will be preplanning your meals every day, for the rest of your life, including the small details like quantities, calories, and protein grams. You will also need to be picky about what restaurants you choose when and if you decide to eat out in restaurants. Be prepared to eat slower. A lot slower. And chew well. Choose your food wisely. No room for fillers here when your stomach is the size of an egg. So no air swallowing habits either, like chewing gum or soda. Eat the wrong food item and you may be sorry for hours or days following.
  4. You’ll have no energy. Actually, if you’re frame has been carrying an extra 50-100 pounds it’s not supposed to be carrying and all of the sudden, in a very short person of time (say, 4-6 months?), you lose it 50 plus pounds, just like that? Wouldn’t ya think the opposite would be true? Think of it more like this: you’ve been carrying a 75 pounds back pack for a few years and I just took it off. How would that feel? This doesn’t really matter what your starting weight is, either. 75 pounds is 75 pounds.  You will also be forced to eat better with surgery, that’s part of what the surgery is for. Run through the drive through with some friends and a cheeseburger real quick and you’ll be running to puke. It’s just what happens when you’re digestive system is rearranged and shortened. Better diet = more energy.
  5. You’ll just gain it all back, so why bother going through that? Not true. Statically, 20% or 1 in 5 individuals who have weight loss surgery will regain all of the weight lost following surgery. But that also means 80% or 4 in 5 will maintain that loss. Those who do not have surgery? If your body mass index is above 30, the sad and terrible truth is, statistically <1% of individuals will maintain any weight off. I know….

In case you haven’t figured it out by now, I’m a pretty big proponent of weight loss surgery. This may surprise you, but like I said, I’ve worked with lots of people and I know their struggle. I’m also a big proponent of taking control of your own life, whatever that may mean for you…and I’m here to help you on that journey. I’ve got a ton of posts for the non-surgery folk too, so look around!

There are various types of surgeries, but the two most effective and common choices available today are the laparoscopic roux-en-y gastric bypass and the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. If you want to know more about them, I encourage you to talk with your doctor. This post would go on forever if I described them here, but certainly feel free to reach out to me for resources if you want to know what they are.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

Follow me for daily livestreams on Facebook

Instagram: TheOilRD

Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

When the angry mirror reflects pale

The first line of a poem I wrote when I was fifteen. Elbow deep into an eating disorder.

When I was fourteen years old, I overhead a well meaning neighbor tell my dad that his daughters “were getting a little round around the middle” and that maybe he should have them do some outside chores. Fourteen year old girls are already self-conscious. Make that very self-conscious about their looks. That neighbor didn’t cause anything, but they did affirm what that insecure teenage girl was hoping not to be true.

She’s fat. She’s not good enough. What she sees in the magazines are not at all what she sees in the mirror. Everything is out of her control. Except what she puts in her mouth. Nobody can tell her what to put in her mouth.

I remember over the next several weeks devising a very restrictive weight loss diet for myself. I wasn’t down with a “round” middle. I think I was an aspiring dietitian from the start, before I knew anything about meal planning. Just be thankful you weren’t a client of mine when I was fourteen!

Over the next 3 months, I lost about forty pounds. Of note, I have a twin sister and we had always been a similar weight up until this point. It happened so fast my family didn’t catch on until I was fully holding myself prisoner to my thoughts. It was pretty evident to everyone at school, all of our family members, and all of our friends. Aside from the whispers I could hear, no one said a word to me. And I was okay with that. Confronting people with hard stuff is hard.

Some of you are telling yourself similar things, too.

“That food is off limits for you. Eat it and you will surely gain five pounds overnight.” You have safe foods and if you go off plan, you are going to pay in self loathing guilt trips.

“Your day is determined by the number on the scale. Lose weight, you can relax,” (at least until breakfast). “If you gain weight, you will need to punish yourself with twenty extra minutes on the treadmill.”

“Wear that outfit because it hides your body.”

For someone with an eating disorder, multiply those thoughts times 100 and circulate them 24/7. The panic that sets in when food is presented that’s off limits, the fear of being caught exercising late at night to work off those extra calories, constantly hiding the anguish under baggy clothes, and the depression are enough to make life unliveable. People with anorexia do get to a  point where they know they shouldn’t lose anymore weight, but the fear of gaining even a pound is so strong that they’d rather continue to disappear.

I’ve been asked many times in my life why I became a Dietitian. I’ve never told the truth. This is my story. In three months, I turned my teenage years upside down along with my family’s and took over three years to recover from with the help of a Dietitian, a Psychiatrist, and God whom I didn’t even know at the time.

He’s always there to help you even if you pay Him no attention. Seek Him and allow yourself to rest on His strength.

Many of you have similar struggles. You aren’t good enough, you hate your body and you punish yourself for it on a daily basis. I may not know what it’s like to be overweight, but I know this struggle. I know it well. I apologize for keeping it to myself all of these years. If I’m going to be of any help to those of you that follow me so faithfully, you need to know my heart and why I really do what I do.

I’ll leave you with my high school poem, a place I happily won’t go back to, but still understand.

 She

When the angry mirror reflected pale,

She mended my shattered heart;

Told me that if I just listened,

My disturbances would dissolve.

She didn’t tell me the payment

Would be much more than I could carry-

The heavy weight on my soul

Replaced by another, much heavier.

I thrived to her golden rules:

Hunger pains do not hurt,

Protruding bones are attractive,

Sacrifice everything to vanish.

She told me a lie:

I would be dominant when I disappeared.

I didn’t know it was

She who stretched the infuriated mirage;

She shackled me to her deceptions,

She became me.

My anorexia and myself.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LD