Food safety tips during and after a power outage

Many of us in Florida are dealing with power outages this hurricane season and that means our refrigerated and freezer items are at risk for developing bacteria.  The question that immediately comes up is, is it safe to eat? Perhaps it’s time for a refresher on a few food safety tips:

  1. Cold (refrigerated) foods should be kept at or below 40ºF. Your appliance will have a temperature setting to tell you where it’s at, but try to avoid opening it as much as possible so you don’t let the cool air out. A closed refrigerator that is full should keep the food cold enough for about four hours.  Once the temp drops below 40ºF, you have a two hour window before the food becomes an ideal environment to grow bacteria.
    • Hopefully you’ve stocked up on ice and coolers to start putting your important items in. Personally, I suggest consuming high risk items prior to reaching above 40º such as eggs, mayonnaise and mayonnaise based products such as tuna/potato/chicken salad and any leftovers.
    • Fruits and vegetables will last much longer than two hours and many are shelf stable, so don’t worry too much about these. An exception would be berries and grapes that tend to spoil quickly. Eat those first.
  2. Frozen items should be kept at or below 0ºF. Again, your freezer should tell you this, but don’t open it more than you have to. A full freezer will keep the temperature for approximately 48 hours (24 hours if it is half full).
    • It is best to keep the items close together so they keep each other cold. Once it rises above 0ºF, watch it as many of those items will be okay if cooked before reaching above 40ºF. Unfortunately if they go over that 40ºF past two hours, especially frozen meats, it’s time to throw them out. It’s just not worth the risk of getting sick.
    • Remember, you can put some of your refrigerated items in the freezer to keep them under their 40ºF for a longer period of time and you may be able to save them.
    • Having extra ice packs, even dry ice if you can get some, full tupperware of frozen water, and full frozen ice trays stocked in your freezer can help keep the food at ideal temperatures for as long as possible.
  3. Hopefully you stocked up on nonperishables. If you didn’t, there will likely be a next time and might as well plan sooner than later. These are some of my favorites:
    • Quest protein bars
    • Starbucks light double shots (gotta have coffee)
    • Trail mix or mixed nuts or any kind of nuts are great
    • Peanut butter or any kind of nut butter
    • Triscuits (for spreading nut butter on – better than just plain ol’ bread to me)
    • Bananas
    • Tangerines
    • Tomatoes (I could eat these like apples!)
    • Apples
    • Beef jerky
    • Pre-seasoned tuna pouches
    • 3 ounce chicken cans
    • Cracklin oat bran cereal (or granola is good too!)
    • Animal crackers (okay, not most nutritional, but gotta have a crunchy snack!)
    • Dried fruit (I got mini raisin boxes, mangos, and apricots this go around)
    • Pita bread
    • Avocados
    • 1 gallon water per person per day
  4. A sample menu for you using only shelf stable food:
    • Breakfast:
      • Quest bar + tangerine
      • Pita bread with peanut butter and banana sandwich
      • Cracklin oat bran + 1/4 cup dried fruit
      • All to include Starbucks light double shot of course!
    • Lunch/Dinner:
      • Tuna pouch + sliced tomato + 8 triscuits
      • Pita bread + sliced avocado + canned chicken + 10 animal crackers
      • Peanut butter spread on 8 triscuits + mini raisin box
      • Pita bread with peanut butter and banana sandwich + 1/4 cup trail mix
    • Snack tips:
      • No stress eating! This is a stressful time, but it’s not going to make you feel better. I’ve written lots of posts on this in the past explaining why.
      • Stick to the rule of eating every three hours as much as you can. Your meals are possibly going to be smaller, however, so eat to hunger if necessary. High protein, shelf stable snacks include: nuts, trail mix, beef jerky, canned chicken, and tuna pouches. When the power goes out, cheese sticks and yogurt are great to eat up first. I also recommend hard boiling your eggs beforehand so you have snacks and breakfast items to eat while they are still in the correct temperature zones. Remember, you are probably going to have to throw out these highly perishable items anyway- cook them while you can!
  5. What do you do when the power comes back on?
    • Do not, I repeat, do not rely on odor and appearance to determine if a food is safe to eat. You gotta rely on temperatures. Trust me when I say, a food borne illness in the aftermath of a hurricane is not something you want to be dealing with.
    • Throw anything out that has reached above 40ºF for longer than two hours. Period. Especially meats that started to defrost and any frozen items that no longer have ice crystals.
    • If a food has been determined safe to eat and is perishable, such as eggs, meat, etc – be sure to cook it all the way. No rare steak or sunny side up eggs just to be sure.
    • Lastly, when in doubt, just throw it out. You can always replace the food later. Be safe!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Foods that naturally boost your metabolism

First off, let’s start with a little background because most people who struggle with their weight are tempted to blame their metabolism for the difficulty they are experiencing. If you have a longstanding history of weight cycling, aka yo yo dieting, a slow metabolism may very well be your problem – for the purposes of this post, that is what the main focus will be. So what happens to your metabolism when you weight cycle, aka “yo yo” diet?

1. First, you lose a lot of fat mass (good thing) but a lot of muscle mass too (unavoidable with rapid weight loss, not a good thing)
2. If it was not a sustainable diet (often it’s not), then the weight piles back on at lightning speed, but this time it is all mostly replaced with fat mass.
3. Fat burns less calories than muscle = your metabolism tanks. Next time you try to diet, it doesn’t come off as easily or fast.
4. Over time, chronic dieters find themselves with a slower and slower metabolism because they keep losing muscle and replacing it with fat. It’s a viscous cycle that eventually makes it almost impossible for weight loss success to occur.

Fear not, if this all sounds too familiar and you think you are in this situation, I’ve done a little research for you and found some promising ways to boost your metabolism, naturally.

  • Tomato juice: in a 2015 study published by the NIH, menopausal women aged 40-60 who consumed 200 ml unsalted tomato juice twice daily experienced an increased in resting energy expenditure (REE) by an average of 400 calories
    Bottom line: drink 200 milliliters twice a day (about 6 ounces twice a day). Hey, it’s not gonna hurt anything.
  • Cinnamon: in a 2012 study published by the International Journal of Preventative Medicine, one group of individuals took cinnamon supplements every day, while the other group took a placebo. After 8 weeks, the cinnamon group lost more weight and body fat than the group taking the placebo.
    Bottom line: add cinnamon to your food or try the pure essential oil for a more concentrated version. Contact me if you are interested in learning more about brands I trust and recommend. remember, supplements are not regulated and therefore, may not be free of contaminants.
  • Coffee: most studies with caffeine in doses of about 100mg per day (6 ounces of coffee) showed an increased calorie burn between 75 and 110 calories for the entire day. There are other sources of caffeine, but coffee is a calorie free source that actually contains some antioxidants.
    Bottom line: have some caffeine before exercise to maximize the calorie burring effects if you are going to try this one. Hey, I love coffee, why  not?
  • Grapefruit: A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food in 2006 showed that obese patients who consumed 8 oz of grapefruit juice or 1/2 of a grapefruit before each meal lost about 3.5 lbs after 12 weeks, without making any other changes to their diets. Participants in the study who consumed a grapefruit capsule before meals also lost weight — but just 2.2 pounds over the 12 weeks. The placebo group did not lose weight.
    Bottom line: drink 8 ounces grapefruit juice, eat 1/2 grapefruit daily, or take a grapefruit capsule with meals (I recommend with 2-3 drops pure essential oil in each one, contact me for recommended brands)
  • Lean Protein: Eggs, chicken, fish, low-fat yogurt, low-fat cheese, turkey
    The “thermic effect of food” (TEF) is the energy we use to digest food into small, absorbable components. Protein burns more calories to digest than carbs & fats. It also takes longer to digest, keeping you fuller longer.
    Bottom line: include 30 grams protein at meals, 8-10 grams of protein at snacks, and eat every 3-5 hours
  • Ginger: promotes digestion and stimulates metabolism, which leads to increased calorie burning. In animal studies, it increased metabolisms by 20%. In human studies, most herbal supplements taken internally increase metabolic rates by 2 to 5% tops. Every little bit helps! In a small, but very interesting pilot study, it was shown to enhance the thermic effect of food and increase the feeling of fullness after a meal. Bottom line: add it to your foods (we aren’t animals); you could also try the pure essential oil for a more concentrated source. If youve never cooked with essential oils, visit my previous post here.

What about appetite suppressants?

There are a few medical options that can help. I’ve talked them in the past along with habits that can help. In the spirit of natural options, here are some effective options I found in  my research:

  • Peppermint Oil: in its food grade, it is used often in the candy and dental industries (seems like an oxymoron, huh?). There is a reason for those after dinner mints! Because of the strong smell, it has an appetite suppressing effect in its purity. Try brushing your teeth after dinner, chewing mint gum while cooking, or diffusing peppermint essential oil to take advantage of this benefit.
  • Water: dehydration often leads to excessive hunger and even sugar cravings, especially chronic dehydration. Aim to consume half of your body weight in ounces of water daily. Add citrus for flavor and extra cleansing benefits. My personal favorite is pure lemon essential oil. Better yet, add fresh squeezed grapefruit juice or grapefruit essential oil.
  • Capsaicin: as in chili peppers. Ever notice you eat less when you have an extra spicy dish? This is why. Unless you are a glutton for punishment, of course.

Let me know what you try and feel free to reach out to me if you are interested in learning more about incorporating essential oils into your weight management routine.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Back to school tips for a healthy family (and your sanity!)

This is a crazy time of year. Lazy days of summer are over and routines are back in full force. I relish the summer because of slow mornings and relaxed evenings without homework. Movie nights any night we want, lunch at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, and leisurely mid-week breakfasts are over.

I once read that August is kinda like the Sunday of the year. It represents a new start and recommitment to improving what hasn’t worked in the previous months. Some of you may have children transitioning into middle or high school this year and if you’re like me, you might have a child just entering the school world. Change is here! But that doesn’t mean you have to feel like you’re drowning in after school sports schedules, reading logs, and math homework that you live on pizza and fast food for the next 9 months.

Tips for maintaining sanity and a healthy family during the school year:

  1. Pre-make freezer meals. These can be precooked or not. I’ve done both. If you decide to precook I recommend making enough for at least two meals – one for that evening and one to freeze. It’s much easier to make two at once while you already have the stuff out. Raw meats can be put in large freezer bags with chopped veggies and sauces then frozen for later cooking (baked, pressure or slow cooked.)
  2. Plan ahead. Duh. You’ll have a routine. You’re gonna know when football practice is and when the games are. There’s gonna be late nights that cooking isn’t going to happen. Will those nights be the night you save Monday’s leftovers for? Or the night you decide your family will eat out? It’s okay to eat out 1-2 times a week. It’s not okay to just decide you’re gonna be a fast food family every night during the week.
  3. Plan quick meals. Thirty minute meals sound great. But let’s face it, sometimes that’s too long when it’s late and you’ve got starving kids whining at you. Some of my favorite fifteen minute meals to make include: cheese omelets with fruit and whole wheat toast, deli sandwiches and salad, salad (using pre-made salad bags) with pre-cooked chicken, deli meat, or canned tuna, etc. Nothing wrong with a protein shake or protein bar and yogurt/fruit either. Not all kids will enjoy that last option so I may boil them a hot dog and add raw veggies with ranch if that’s what I go for. Just be flexible! Meals are probably not always going to be your traditional family style meat and two sides.
  4. Establish a bed time and routine. I’ve been guilty in the past about not doing this. You know what happens? There isn’t one and every night turns into a circus, ending with sweat and tears. (I’m not talking about my kids!)  If you don’t want this to happen, decide now when bed time will be and then reverse engineer. That’s will determine what time dinner is going to be. It’s not always going to work out perfectly, but establishing this will make life much easier for you and help you make decisions about what responsibilities and activities you participate later on in the school year.
  5. Take a good multivitamin. Yes, I’m advising your whole family do this. It’s important to fill in the nutritional gaps with a high quality vitamin. This can really help with immunity, focus, and sleep quality. Germs and common childhood illnesses are frequent throughout the school year! Lessen your chances with this simple step. I’d love to tell you if you eat a diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meats, dairy, and whole grains that you’ll be set. But I’m not that confident in today’s food supply or our ability to consistently eat a perfect diet in today’s busy lifestyle. If you would like recommendations for brands, feel free to contact me. Not all are created equal.
  6. Stock up on fresh fruits and vegetables. And make them convenient to eat. This means they are cut up, washed, and stored in clear containers in the front of the refrigerator. Consider storing apples, oranges, and bananas in a fruit bowl on the kitchen counter. Research shows that this really increases the chances they will be consumed by your family first and more often throughout the week. These will make for much healthier after school snacks over the bag of chips in the pantry! We eat what’s convenient.
  7. If you plan to pre-pack lunches, try to make them for 2-3 days ahead of time. Again, when you’ve got the stuff out already, it saves time. Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches last up to three days without going soggy. I’ve tested it myself. And be okay with allowing your kids to eat at school some of the time. I learned a while ago that it’s not healthy for me to be up all hours losing sleep in the kitchen trying to pack everyone the perfect lunch.
  8. Grocery shop once a week. Pick a day and time you’re gonna do it consistently. If possible, not a weekend day in the afternoon. This is the busiest and most stressful time and it will take you the longest. Make a list before you go and get it done. No food in the kitchen = no meals made at home. Some grocery stores are now offering curb side pick up. Do your shopping online, they get it together for you, and you just pick it up at the door. Genius! I have a previous post  if you need help with budgeting.
  9. Eat breakfast. As moms, we are pretty good about making sure our children eat a healthy breakfast before rushing off to school. And then we get to work or go on about our day and never get beyond the cup of coffee for ourselves. Don’t do that. Everyone needs breakfast to maintain a healthy weight, perform better, focus throughout the day, and to prevent unhealthy snacking. While you’re making your children breakfast, take the extra two minutes to make yourself one too. If that’s really a no go, consider a meal replacement. I offer insights and suggestions here. Popular kid’s breakfast options include peanut butter on waffles, peanut butter and jelly (I like uncrustables for a fast fix), oatmeal with brown sugar and raisins, cereal and milk with strawberries or bananas, cheese omelet with fruit, cinnamon raisin toast and a banana, yogurt and cheerios, hard boiled eggs and toast.
  10. Be flexible. The biggest reason people fail at their health goals is because they get stuck in the mentality that their plans needs to be perfect. As soon as something unexpected happens (a child failed their test, you get asked to volunteer for the halloween party, you get a flat tire on the way to school, etc), they throw in the towel. I call this “Plan A,” perfectionism, which really only happens 5% of the time. Plan B is your reality, so flexibility is key because these things are going to come up, 90% of the time. That’s just life. What’s the other 5%? Plan C….reserved for those days when you’re probably gonna stay home, order a pizza, and call it a day. Luckily they only happen occasionally!

    Most important thing is, you make a plan, allow for flexibility, fall off course sometimes, and consistently get back on track. 

Good luck this year, I wish you a year of success and fun filled memories!

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free online support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Don’t believe everything you read

I don’t know about you, but it makes me a bit aggravated that we have to comb through piles of research articles to understand what’s in our food supply these days. I’m supposed to be a nutrition expert and even I get confused. I can tell you dietitians are confused too, because they buy in to a lot of the junk out there – and here’s the thing: most of it is opinion based. For instance, if you keep up with the latest nutrition trends, you likely heard about coconut oil recently and how the American Heart Association has deemed it “unhealthy.” They’ve gone as far to say that we should eliminate it from our diets in order to keep our LDL (aka “bad” cholesterol) at bay. In fact, many of the dietitians (not all) in the circles I run in support this stance. Why? Because “holistic” health is unpopular in a science-based community. I’ve experienced the ridicule directly. Sometimes it’s easier to just believe what the big governing bodies say than to go against the grain. The research is there for functional and homeopathic medicine, but it’s not popular in western medicine.

I’ve been there. I was employed by one of the most well known research-based teaching hospitals in the world for nearly ten years. Going against traditional medicine and what a doctor says isn’t very popular. But we need to think for ourselves sometimes, especially if we are going to call ourselves nutrition experts. Because they don’t have time to talk to people about their patients’ diets. It’s not their thing. Their thing is sick people. We are the ones who have a chance to talk to the well and we are blowing it.

Now let me be very clear. I am NOT one of those people that live in fear of the government’s conspiracy against the people. I am NOT one of those people that believe all big Pharma is out “to get us” nor do I believe doctors or researchers have the cure for cancer and they’re just all hiding it from us to stay rich. I’ve looked into the eyes of a doctor right before and right after he’s had to tell a patient they have cancer and their hope for a long future is shattered. Believe me when I say – being rich was not on that doctor’s mind. But I do believe when it comes to making money, the business of pharmaceuticals as well as food manufacturing is alive and well. But that’s for an entirely different conversation.

So let’s get to the subject of the American Heart Association’s so called “review” of the research. They picked four publications to focus on. By now you’ve probably read some rebuttals on the subject as have I. But as a dietitian, I feel it’s my responsibility to write my own evaluation on the subject and properly educate the public. So let’s start with the facts. The press and the AHA have spotlighted coconut oil as being the evil one yet has failed to mention that coconut oil was not the source of saturated fat in their core studies completed over 50 years ago (side note: I was taught to sick within this decade when reviewing research.) I’ve read it twice just to be sure. The saturated fat sources put to the chopping block come from dairy and animal fats in said studies. Those just aren’t the same thing. At the end, coconut oil gets it’s own section, and based off of seven studies they cherry picked, they concluded that coconut oil raises LDL cholesterol in the same way as animal and dairy fats and thus, conclude that it should be eliminated from our diets. They do admit these studies did not examine coconut oil’s direct effects on CVD. It was also noted to raise HDL cholesterol and lowered the LDL:HDL ratio, however (both good things.) I’ll just leave a recent study right here published at the end of 2015.

If the AHA is going to advise against using coconut oil, why didn’t they recommend we eliminate dairy or meat from our diet? I mean, there was more evidence in their review on those two if you ask me. Now I’m not a vegan and I’ve discussed this diet in another post. But there are a lot of good things to be said about going vegan. But then again, the AHA are proponents of the DASH diet, so there’s that. And as you will see later, although they deny conflicts of interest, that remains questionable. They give honorable mention to the mediterranean diet as well, which I also highly recommend. This one is high in monounsaturated fat and those folks tend to have lower rates of heart disease.

Lastly, the underlying theme of this article was that polyunsaturated fats, more specifically omega-6 fats, will save the day. I’m not sure I buy that. It has been known from previous, more current research that eating a higher proportion of omega-6 (found in soybean oil) to omega-3 (found mostly in flax seed, walnuts, and fish) fat has a negative effect on heart health. I do, however, believe that lowering animal fat will decrease LDL cholesterol, which their studies in this review did show.

Scroll down to the very end of this review, not the post everyone’s reading about how unhealthy coconut oil is, but the actual published paper they are referring to. It was funded by eleven pharmaceutical companies including: Amarin, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly, Glaxo-Smith Kline, Merck, Pfizer, Regeneron/Sano, Takeda, Akcea/ Ionis, and Dr. Reddy. And it was also funded by several others including Esai (energy research and consulting firm), California Walnut Commission (Certified by the AHA, proponents of the DASH and Mediterranean diets), Ag Canada and Canola Oil Council, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Seafood Nutrition Partnership, TerraVia (algae oil high in monounsaturated fat, low in saturated fat), and Avocado Nutrition Science Advisors. Need I say more? I think I’m done here.

So what is coconut oil good for anyway?

  1. Oil pulling: the practice of swishing it around like mouthwash for about 10-20 minutes for oral hygiene purposes. In one study in particular, after just fourteen days there was a reduction in plaque forming bacteria, even as good as using chlorhexidine with distilled water. In a second study, oil pulling reduced plaque and gingivitis markers after just seven days and continued after thirty days.
  2. Weight loss aid: because it contains medium chain triglycerides, it has been found to decrease waist circumference after four weeks in subjects, particularly men. It has also shown a slight increase in metabolism, however this has only been a temporary effect which is why I don’t generally recommend it for that purpose.
  3. Antimicrobial and anti-fungal properties: this makes it great for fighting common skin infections and issues like acne, athlete’s foot, candida, even cellulitis.
  4. Moisturizer: again, great for healing dry, irritated skin and related conditions like eczema or diaper rash. It can even be used as a sunscreen, blocking 20% of UV rays.
  5. Anti-inflammatory: studies have shown it may help reduce this symptom of oxidative stress.
  6. Easily digestible energy source that won’t raise blood sugar levels: medium chain triglycerides are the easiest for our bodies to metabolize and thus, are used by the body quickly.
  7. Carrier oil: as an essential oil lover myself, some of them are considered “hot” and are better if mixed with a carrier and will actually be absorbed better because it holds them to the skin longer rather than the essential oil evaporating quickly. The possibilities are endless if using coconut oil since it already acts as a natural moisturizer and anti-fungal. Add essential oils and all of their various health benefits, you can have anything from bug repellents to sleep creams to extra strength anti-fungal creams and more.

These are just to name a few. Coconut oil has a high smoke point, which makes it easier to cook with than other oils like olive oil. It adds a variety of flavor to foods that need a twist. As with anything, no need to go overboard, if you are wanting the health benefits of consuming it, two tablespoons a day is plenty but anything less is probably not enough. And go for organic, extra virgin. The other stuff is highly processed and health benefits are stripped.

As you may have noticed, I’ve included a ton of links to evidenced-based research in this post. I believe in providing sound advice, I really do. Some of the stuff I’ve talk about has been referred to as “quackery,” but that’s just silly. I understand research and have participated in a few studies myself. It IS possible to have a respect for both sides. So now that we’ve cleared all that up, let me know in the comments what your favorite way to use coconut oil is!

P.S. Interested in some weight loss hacks? The event is over, but the replay is still up on Facebook!

P.P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Diet hacks for eating less and feeling full

Portion control. Do you cringe when you hear that? It’s more like portion distortion. The bigger is better mentality has surfaced everywhere – smart phones, television screens, computer monitors, boobs (yea, I said it), muscles, tires, cars, houses, and on and on.

Here’s the deal….most of us don’t even know what a portion of any food actually is. And when we do find out, it’s laughable. Why is that? Well, because we have become conditioned to super-sized servings. Now, a portion is an actual MEASURED amount. A serving is whatever you put on your plate. They are two very different things. So here’s a little education for you:

1 portion of carbohydrate = 1/2 cup (cooked, plain cereal like oatmeal/grits, potatoes, pasta corn, peas, beans) (80 calories) *rice is an exception at only 1/3 cup per serving

1 portion non starchy vegetable = 1 cup raw or 1/2 cup cooked, but really – unlimited (25 calories)

1 portion fresh fruit = 1 cup raw, 1 cup frozen or 1/2 cup canned (60 calories)

1 portion added fat = 1 teaspoon (oil, butter) (100 calories)

1 portion nut butter or avocado, sour cream = 1 tablespoon (90 calories)

1 portion nuts = 1/4 cup (170 calories)

1 portion dairy (milk, plain yogurt, cottage cheese) = 1 cup (110 calories)

1 portion of lean meat (chicken, fish, pork tenderloin, egg) = 3 ounces  or 1 egg (110 calories)

1 portion of high fat meat (beef, ribs, fatty fish) = 1 1/2 ounces (110 calories)

Note these are all estimates and foods vary A LOT depending on added sugars and fats or lack thereof. So reading labels is important too. But the key here is to understand that you are probably over-eating. For example, in a restaurant, the smallest sirloin is 9 ounces, that’s SIX TIMES as much as a “portion size”. I’m not saying you can only eat 1 1/2 ounces, but calories count and they add up fast if you aren’t paying attention. It’s really no wonder how people gain weight easily when they are eating out frequently.

But it’s not just restaurants to blame. It’s how we cook at home, too. For instance, when you make pasta – do you cook the entire box? Have you ever looked at the label? A pound of pasta is enough to feed sixteen people if you are sticking to the 1/2 cup serving. If you go with the box’s suggested serving of two ounces or 1 cup each, then you are cooking for eight people. I’m guessing you aren’t feeding that many people for dinner on a regular basis though. So how do you deal without feeling hungry all the time?

Here are some tried and true tricks:

  1. Realize this is not willpower. I repeat – NOT willpower. It’s skill-power. So first of all, STOP cooking for an army and start cooking for the number of people having the actual dinner. I once counseled a couple that did this and each lost forty pounds without changing what they were eating. If you really don’t want to do this, then plan for leftovers, but make two pans/pots/casseroles and immediately put one in the freezer or whatever you need to do BEFORE you start eating. Remove that temptation.
  2. Use smaller plates – as in six to eight inch plates. You know those salad plates you have that came with your ten inch dinner plates. Yeah, those ones. In a study done by food scientist and researcher, Brian Wansink, he explored how an optical illusion leads us to make inaccurate estimates of serving size, depending on what size plate they are presented on. The more “white space” around the circle, the smaller it appears and thus, we feel the need to fill the plate to the edges. Same goes with bowls, in another study he conducted at a health and fitness camp, campers who were given larger bowls served and consumed 16% more cereal than those given smaller bowls. Despite the fact that those campers were eating more, they estimated eating 7% less than the group eating from the smaller bowls. Interesting, huh?
  3. Allow a good twenty minutes to finish your first plate before getting seconds. It takes your brain that long to register that you have eaten. Now I do understand that it can be quite annoying to eat slow if you are a naturally fast eater. So I suggest if you zip through your meal in five to ten minutes, then wait for the next ten minutes to pass before you decide if you truly need a second helping. And if you do, go for veggies first since they are the lowest in calories.
  4. Use the plate method and shift the calorie make up on your plate. This goes with the concept of a volumetrics type diet. Notice how vegetables only have twenty-five calories per portion? But the starchy carbohydrates have eighty? And that’s assuming you didn’t load them up with gravy, butter, or other fats. Same with meats, 110 calories per one to two ounces? Fill up half of your plate with non-starchy vegetables (so NOT corn/peas/potatoes), a third with high fiber carbohydrates, and the rest with a meat, preferably a lean meat. If it’s breakfast time, fill that half with fruits. Make sense? You are eating more low calorie foods and less high calorie foods, but not sacrificing volume. Another way of looking at is like this: one cup of salad dressing is around 1440 calories, one cup of nuts is 680 calories, one cup of fat free milk is 90 calories and one cup of raw vegetables is 25 calories. In other words, a large plate of pasta is going to be a ton more calories than a plate of salad. Here’s the issue with most of us: usually our plates are half meat (often high fat), half starch, and vegetables as an afterthought or something starchy like corn (at least here in the south!) Personally, I prefer the plate method over measuring my food. I got kids and if I don’t inhale my food, I don’t eat before there’s an explosion of a hot mess in my house. Like many of you I’m sure, I don’t get the luxury of measuring, weighing, and taking my time to eat dinner – so I’m thankful for these hacks that still make it possible to eat well.

Lastly, remember that the above will not work if you arrive to the dinner table starving. The day starts with a healthy breakfast, planned out high protein snacks and a healthy lunch. If you didn’t eat high protein, healthy foods every three to five hours earlier in the day, you can forget about the rest because you will want to eat the refrigerator door by the time you sit down for dinner and a six inch plate will just piss you off. For tips on preplanning meals – head over to this previous post on how to do that.

P.S. Love to eat out but not sure how to fit it in with your health and wellness goals? Get these tips  sent to your inbox and hopefully they will help you out.

P.P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Part 1: Food additives, are they safe?

MSG, GMO, HFCS, and on and on and on. I dunno about you, but it’s really confusing to eat healthy these days because it seems there is always someone around the corner saying what once was thought to be a health food is now going to disrupt my hormones, upset my gut health, or wreak havoc on my immune system. I thought it was just an apple?

Seriously, when I was growing up my dad always told me those kept the doctor away. And so far for him, they have…..but he’s also from the generation that doesn’t go to the doctor. Not unless there’s a limb hanging off. (That’s another topic, because I don’t necessarily support that mindset, we’ve had a few scares with him over the years.)

So which is it? What do you need to look for? I know if I’m confused and I’m a Dietitian, others must be too. And unfortunately in my research on this topic, our food supply ain’t what it used to be. With growing food trends to make more, make more that lasts longer, and feed the masses from far away places, we need to be aware of what’s in our foods and what we are comfortable feeding ourselves and our families. There are many and I won’t be able to cover them all in this post, but I’ll start with a few today:

  • Sodium nitrites and nitrates: if you have EVER talked to me about eating processed meat of any kind, I’ve likely told you to take the extra second and find some without this ingredient. This includes your bacon, deli meat, hot dogs (should you choose to indulge), sausage and any canned or cured meats like vienna sausage. They are added to these foods to enhance the color and acts as a preservative. If you’ve ever had a nitrite/nitrate free slice of bacon or deli turkey slice, you would NOT taste the difference. But you would be ridding yourself of the cancer-causing effects. We now know that there is a very strong link to digestive cancer and this food preservative. Here is what the American Institute of Cancer Research says: “Research shows that any amount of processed meat eaten regularly increases the risk of both stomach and colorectal cancers. Why risk it when there are other options easily available?
  • Carrageenan: it’s extracted from red seaweed and used in a wide variety of applications in the food industry as a thickening, gelling, stabilizing and suspending agent in water and milk systems. So you are going to find it mostly in dairy products including liquid coffee creamer, cottage cheese, yogurt, soy milk, almond milk, processed cheese, chocolate milk, ice cream, frosting mix, and infant formulas. According to numerous research studies, it’s linked to various harmful effects in the gastrointestinal system including cancer and inflammatory bowel disease (such as ulcers and ulcerative colitis.) The article linked is a review of multiple animal studies – note I don’t always take these types of studies seriously because we’re people and our bodies are very different from rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, and monkeys. But here’s the deal – the results were profound. In just one example, they noted that 100% of guinea pigs given 2% degraded carrageenan as liquid for 20–30 days had colonic ulcerations and  75% of the animals developed > 200 ulcers. When guinea pigs were given 1% undegraded carrageenan as liquid for 20–30 days, 80% developed colonic ulcerations. The review concluded:
• Degraded carrageenan is a known carcinogen in animal models
• Undegraded carrageenan is a known co-carcinogen in animal models of carcinogenesis• In animal models, both degraded and undegraded carrageenan have been associated with development of intestinal ulcerations that resemble ulcerative colitis
• Hydrolysis such as may occur by exposure to gastric acid in the human stomach can lead to the depolymerization of undegraded carrageenan and the availability of degraded carrageenan
• Food-grade carrageenan may be contaminated with low molecular weight, degraded carrageenan that may arise during food processing
• The use of a viscosity measurement to characterize a carrageenan sample is insufficient because the presence of a small number of large molecules (and undegraded carrageenan may have molecular weight in the millions) may obscure a significant low molecular weight fraction.

Personally, my soy milk is carrageenan free. I’m sure it creeps up in my diet elsewhere but when I can, I will be avoiding it.

  • Potassium Bromate: used as a flour enhancer – it increases the volume of bread and produces a fine crumb structure. Most bromate rapidly breaks down to form innocuous bromide during the baking process. The problem is that bromate itself is a known carcinogen in animals and if tiny amounts remain in the end product, it poses a risk to those who eat it. I dunno about you, but I’m getting pretty upset about the amount of known cancer-causing additives in our food products, even if “tiny” and in animals. Especially since many of them, including bromate have been banned everywhere else except in the United States (bromate is also allowed in Japan although most manufacturers have voluntary stopped using it.) Just a side note, if you live in California, you are less likely to consume it because a cancer warning is required on the label when they use it. I will mention many of the brands we are familiar with, like Pepperidge Farm, Arnolds, Entenmann’s and several large supermarket chains have switched to non-bromate bread more than a decade ago, but there are still several products on the market you should be aware of that still use it. For the most updated list I could find on the internet, click here.  If you aren’t sure, read the ingredients list and look for “potassium bromate” or “bromated flour.”

I’m gonna stop here for now because frankly, it takes quite a bit of research on my part to give you sound advice on what’s going on out there. I’m not about instilling the fear in you so you don’t want to eat anything and I know that the world of nutrition can be quite dramatic sometimes. Get on google for a few minutes and you will want to start your own garden and wonder if you have what it takes to milk a cow.

I am going to continue with this in future posts and I would love to hear from you. If there are any food additives or preservatives that you have been wondering about – safety, etc., please contact me or comment on this post.

P.S. If you’re looking for online support with like minded moms striving to live a healthier lifestyle, you may be interested in joining my free support group here.

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Email: contact@jillianmcmullen.com

Jillian McMullen, RDN, CSOWM, LDN

Ketogenic and the Whole 30 Diets – Yay or Nay?

I’ve recently started a series on some of the more popular diets right now to hopefully take the guess work out of whether or not you should consider them. For this week, I’m gonna focus on the Ketogenic diet and the Whole 30 diet.

Ketogenic diet: a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet – usually three to four grams of fat per gram of carbohydrate and protein combined coming from heavy whipping cream, butter, mayonnaise, and oils. Why it is used: it helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy and should be prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. This is not just a low carb diet like the Atkins.  It is supposed to produce ketones in the body (hence the name), which are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Normally our body uses carbohydrate as its primary energy source. In normal circumstances, the bare minimum I ever recommend is 100 to 130 grams of carbohydrate. This diet includes minimum carbs, often under ten grams per day, to force the body to use fat for energy.

Pros: in those with intractable seizures meaning, non responsive to medications, it can greatly reduce their frequency and severity of seizures. It can cause rapid weight loss, but a ketogenic diet in the true sense is going to do anything but. Also, prolonged ketosis is not a natural state that the human body functions well in (which I will explain below in the “cons” section.) Having said that, it can be life saving and changing for those merely surviving one seizure to the next.

Cons: since the body is designed to use carbohydrates for energy, expect to feel pretty sluggish. Our primary food sources of carbohydrate include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and dairy. So you can expect constipation as well. If you aren’t constipated, you may have diarrhea due to the high fat content or, if you’re really lucky, alternating. Other issues related to a high fat diet include reflux, nausea, vomitting, and kidney stones. In addition, it’s not very nutritionally balanced and even mineral absorption issues can occur causing hair loss, weakened bones, muscle cramps, acute pancreatitis, impaired focus and memory (the brain needs sugar), high cholesterol, increased inflammation, depressed mood, and even menstrual irregularities. Sounds fun, right?

Whole 30 diet: this diet claims that food, primarily grains, sugar, alcohol, and legumes, are the root of all your health ailments. I see this one daily in the health circles I run in. Most people that follow this are doing so because they want to feel better. Nothing wrong with that. It’s temporary and the closest thing I can compare it to is an elimination diet I put people on who are allergic to multiple foods and they aren’t sure which one(s) are the culprit. The theory is after thirty-one days, you will know right away which food is the cause of your health problems because you feel terrible once you reintroduce it back into your diet. While I agree we could all go without sugar and alcohol and be better off for it, I have never met a person who has allergies, irritable bowel syndrome, or chronic knee pain because they eat mini wheats for breakfast and legumes at dinner time. Sorry, but I’ve been a dietitian for a while now and I’ve never seen nor read any validated research backing this up. Having said that, I’m all for a diet that advocates eating more fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and advocates cooking more and eating less processed food.

Pros: it’s an overall very healthy diet that eliminates sugar and refined, processed food – all of which we eat too much of. It’s also high in fiber and protein, two things I’m a big fan of in any diet.

Cons: while I love the idea of getting people to cook more and eat more whole foods, zero eating out and zero convenience food options is going to make this difficult for many in our fast paced society. This diet is only for the motivated individual who can really dedicate themselves to focusing on their food for the month. I’m not really excited about the idea that it’s a temporary diet – going on a diet just means you plan to go off a diet. But hey, if you truly feel better, it could be the beginning of something great, right?

So there ya have it. Two more diets for you. If you are totally in love with either of these diets, I’m only offering my insight and opinions. None of this is meant to hurt feelings of any die hard fans. If you would like to learn more about a specific diet, let me know in the comments section.

Also, if you’d like more information on the diet that I do recommend and how I’ve helped others lose 30-80lbs following simple steps, contact me here.

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Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

Paleo? Vegan? Mediterr-wha? Which diet should I be following?

This has been a popular theme recently in my life so I thought I would give my take on the various diets all over the internet in the coming weeks. My hopes is the clarify some of the confusion and help you decide what is best for your situation. For this post, I’m going to start with the two that I feel are fairly popular and recommended frequently by health professionals.

  • Paleolithic – most commonly known as just, “Paleo” and also known as the “Caveman Diet.” Wildly popular and recommended by doctors, chiropractors, personal trainers, and others for those looking to get lean, gain energy, and lose weight. In summary, it eliminates grains, refined sugar, dairy, potatoes, salt, refined oils like canola oil, and wheat. It consists of nuts, seeds, eggs, olive oil, coconut oil, lean meats, fish, fresh fruits and vegetables. No processed food whatsoever if you are truly following the concept although there are lots of “paleo-friendly” packaged foods on the market that go against this idea. Everyone’s gotta maximize the marketing potential, right?

Pros: it can yield weight loss because it cuts out the calorically dense junk food and it promotes satiety because it tends to be high in fiber and good protein. It doesn’t require you to count calories if weight loss is the goal, which is a big pro for most.

Cons: you’re likely going to have to fill in nutrient gaps, specifically folate, the B vitamins, calcium, and vitamin D which are all found in dairy products and fortified grains. It’s very difficult for the average person to follow long term due to it’s elimination of convenience food and therefore, restaurant meals.

  • Plant based whole foods also known as Vegan. Numerous research has shown the health benefits of following this diet such as lower blood pressure, reduced blood lipids, reduced blood sugar levels, and weight loss to name a few. To truly follow this diet – as in “Forks Over Knives” style, you will need to eliminate all processed and highly refined foods such as added oils and sugars, meat, dairy, eggs, and seafood. It includes fruits and vegetables, whole grains such as wild rice, oats, barley, quinoa, whole grain pasta, millet, and sprouted grain breads, beans, nuts, legumes, seeds, avocados, dried fruits, potatoes, hummus, tempeh, and tofu.

Pros: Could possibly lead to weight loss due to the elimination of calorically dense, highly processed junk food. This diet is also rich in fiber, antioxidants and vitamins/minerals from their natural sources – fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes. All which may lead to reduced risks of various types of cancers.

Cons: At first, some may find they are hungry because of the drop in protein intake from animal sources. Supplementation from vitamin B12 is required on this type of diet. There is a risk of iron deficiency because it is best absorbed by the body from animal sources rather than from plant sources. So a person on this diet should be mindful to consume a good source of vitamin C along with a high iron containing food to maximize absorption. Eating in restaurants can be a challenge.

As you can see, both have excellent qualities and downfalls, too. They both take massive amounts of commitment, but have big health payoffs. I recommend starting small, regardless of which one you choose. Overhauling your entire life overnight will never work, so start with removing refined, processed sugars and carbohydrates out of your life first. That’s good for everyone and clearly, it is important enough to be included in both diets I’ve discussed here. In fact, I will be surprised if they are allowed in any of the diets worth anything that I discuss in the coming weeks.

So, what does it mean to eliminate processed, refined carbohydrates? This means you are getting rid of what I call the “six C’s.” In other words – cereal, cake, candy, cookies, chips, and crackers. That about covers it. But for completes sake, foods that come in a box with an ingredient list and sugar content are also processed – granola bars, pretzels, baked goods (especially white versions), fruit snacks (including this for moms), chocolate(s), and of course, added sugar of any kind. If you are going to use it, try agave or honey. They are both going to be processed in the body just like white table sugar but they at least contain some added antioxidants – so still use sparingly.

Let me know what you think and if you’d like to learn more about these topics and gain support from others on this journey, request to join my free online community by clicking here.

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Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LDN

 

Help! My family won’t agree on the same meal!

So many of us can relate. I know I can.

My husband eats just about anything.

My 7 year old son will, too. But it requires lots of coaxing and positive reinforcement before he will even try it. And still, there are foods he won’t touch. Normal “no touch zone” kid foods – onions, peppers, zucchini, squash, and oddly enough- potatoes (unless they’re french fries.) He loves black olives though, go figure.

Let’s talk about my 4 year old. When he was a baby, he couldn’t get enough. I had to feed him eight ounces of baby food three times a day. He ate it all, pureed turkey included. I was optimistic. Until we introduced table food. You know that saying “they’ll eat when they’re hungry?” It’s not true for this guy. He would rather starve than eat a food that didn’t look right, smell right, or taste right to him. He rarely gets to the “taste right”  stage if it didn’t “smell right.” The kid smells frozen waffles and has the nose of a hound dog on the hunt. I can name about ten foods he will rotate and another ten he likes on occasion.

And for me? Well, I’m not a big meat eater. I’m not fond of leftovers once they’ve been sitting in the freezer for months on end. But other than that, I’ll eat it if I could get the rest of the family to agree. And therein lies the problem. The problem many of you have voiced. In attempts to solve the mystery for myself and to help a fellow momma out, I’ve come up with a few tips (and recipes) to prevent the insanity we all know as dinner.

  1. Set the same time and day to plan your meals for each week. Make it a family meeting. If your husband is like mine and doesn’t care, then at least involve your children. This doesn’t mean you are going to get everyone on the same page for every meal. However, it does mean you are more likely to get everyone on to agree to try each meal. There won’t be any surprises when you set brussel sprouts on the table this Tuesday night because they knew it was coming.
  2. Make easily modified meals rather than two or three separate meals. You probably didn’t have a special meal prepared for you just because you didn’t like what was cooked. I don’t remember ever, not once getting a choice for dinner as a child. If I didn’t want to be hungry, I ate. The only preference that mattered was my dad’s. That’s who my mother cooked for. My parents have been married for 34 years. That tells me something important. For example, we have stir fry meals quite often. My four year old is not going to touch a mixed dish like that. However, he loves rice with butter mixed in. He gets the rice, we get the stir fry on the rice. Same with pasta. He gets butter pasta while the rest of us get a more interesting pasta dish with vegetables and meat sauce. I always offer him the rest on his plate. Why? Because it takes a minimum of seven offerings before you can say your child truly doesn’t like a food item. SEVEN. I can say this with 100% accuracy that it’s been true for my oldest child who now eats cabbage when the first time he literally gagged it down. Remember we are teaching them important rules about nutrition in these early years. I know if my children had a choice, it would be pop-tarts, french fries, and candy all day long.
  3. Opt in for a farm bag co-op. For a low price, you can have farm fresh fruits and vegetables delivered right to your doorstep every week. Usually you do not choose what you get because you truly get whatever is freshly grown in season. I cannot tell you how exciting this is for my children. Often, we get items no one in the family has tried before and it becomes a sweet family experience. Plus, there is something about eating fresh and ripe that just makes fruits and vegetables taste better. Your kids will notice.
  4. Involve them in the cooking process. I know it can be aggravating because they are messy, they do things slower, and you have to take extra steps to make sure they don’t cut a finger off or burn themselves. But if you want your children to eat, let them be a part of the process. The pride they feel in something they created is often enough to get them to at least try it and when they try it, they may go ahead and eat it.
  5. Don’t stress if they’ve tried it, but didn’t eat it. Remember when your parents made you clean your plate? One of the most difficult habits for an overweight adult to break is to not leave food on their plate, regardless of hunger. I assure you, the world hunger problems will still exist regardless if you leave food on your plate. There are organizations you can donate to if you want to make a real difference. We need to be okay with food left on the plate. Children are very good at gaging their hunger and satiety cues, let them do it.

This is hard stuff, I know. But you’ve got enough stress in your life. Dinner shouldn’t be one of them. One day we will all look back on these times as the best in our lives and wonder where it all went. Enjoy your family, their differences and all!

Need more ideas from moms like yourself? Ask to join Jillian’s free online community by clicking here.

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Jillian McMullen, CSOWM, RDN, LD

 

Are you scared to try new foods?

I’m not talking about octopus on crackers, fried crickets, or organs. But I am talking about trying new healthy foods, maybe exotic fruits and vegetables, foods you’ve written off as a child and assumed you don’t like as an adult. And even foods you just made a decision not to like because they are “health foods.”

We can be so “judgy” can’t we? Truth is, our food habits and preferences were formed early in life based on cultural and social factors. Often based upon what part of the world were were raised in, who cooked for us, our socioeconomic status, and whether or not we were forced to clean our plates.

I’ll just use myself as an example. It wasn’t until I met my husband that I learned cooking rice was worth the effort. I had never tried anything other than instant rice growing up and assumed any other way was just too difficult and took too long. Now my eyes have been opened to a whole world of possibilities and varieties!

In this video, I’ve given you some examples of simple, but healthful foods I’ve tried over the past couple of years and why. None of them require a trip to the nearest health food store or an increase in my grocery budget. Just a willingness to try new things.

That’s what my challenge is for you starting today. Take me up on it. Open your palate to possibilities of new tastes and experiences while nourishing your body, even during the holidays. Even if only this one time each day. To begin, just follow my instagram account over at The Oil RD and you will find today’s first food to try. Tag a friend because these things are always so much better with company. Post a picture on your own account with what you’ve come up with that incorporates the food of the day and tag it with the #LikeAnRD hashtag of the day.

See you over on instagram!